Skip to main content

Full text of "College Greetings"

See other formats


Our Homage to the Past 


An Historical Address 


Delivered at Founders' Day Celebration 


of Illinois Woman's College 


Jacksonville, Illinois 


October 13 


1910 


By 


Hiram Buck Prentice 


Kenilworth, Illinois 


Printed by order of the Board of Trustees 



Al^li> 



Digitized by tlie Internet Arcliive 

in 2011 witli funding from 

CARL!: Consortium of Academic and Researcli Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/collegegreetings1516illi 



Our Homage to the Past 



.jj^^B^^^aai^ 




Rev. William Swain Prentice, D.D. 

May 21, 1819 June 28, 1887 




Rev. Hiram Buck, D.D. 

]March i, 1819 August 21, 1892 



42.576 



Our Homage to the Past 

In treating this theme it shall be my aim to have it 
apply principally to the men known as the "Founders of 
1862," and incidentally to such other men and events of 
the nearby years as seem necessary to give to it the 
proper setting. First I should say that most of what 
is said about persons is intended as a collection of per- 
sonal impressions, gained not from observations at the 
time, but from a subsequent knowledge of these men, 
with most of whom I came in contact in later years, and 
of course I speak with greater confidence and fullness 
of such as I have known. By no means is this intended 
to be an historical essay, but rather a short cursory 
comment descriptive of the times in which this crucial 
period of the college's history was laid, of the atmosphere 
and conditions that surrounded these times, and enough 
of facts to warrant the conclusion that we do well to 
honor these men of the past. 

YOKE FELLOWS. 

But before taking up the theme proper I shall first 
discharge that part of the duty laid upon me by President 
Harker, of saying something specially about the two men 
of this number whom I knew best — my father, William 
S. Prentice, and Hiram Buck, whose lives and labors as 
ministers were so closely linked together ; realizing, how- 
ever, my utter inability to adequately perform this serv- 
ice and speak of them as they should be and could be 
spoken of. 

These two men were born in the same year — 18 19. 
They were entirely unlike, and yet from their first ac- 
quaintance, which was after they had both entered the 



ministry, their natures seemed to blend into one and 
throughout tlie remainder of their Hves thev were to each 
other as David and Jonathan. 

Young Buck was brought up in New York state on 
a farm and at the age of sixteen came west to Ihinois, 
where he shifted for himself, clerking and working at 
whatever he could find to do. He was studious, mostly 
his own teacher, and what he learned he learned well. 
He was converted and entered the Illinois conference in 
1843, six years before Prentice. He rose rapidly and 
always measured up to the responsibilities of the larger 
fields that opened to him. He became presiding elder at 
the age of thirty-three years and was in that office twenty- 
three years. 

Dr. Buck was a man large of stature, large of heart. 
Everybody loved him and he loved everybody. With 
children he was a veritable Kriss Kringle, with his breth- 
ren a jovial companion, and with the people, who "heard 
him gladly" and always welcomed his coming, a genial 
and trusted friend. 

As a preacher and orator he was a Boanerges — a 
"son of thunder." Sin and Satan, treason and disloyalty 
trembled at his powerful and impassioned utterances. He 
was a man of fine sensibilities, with a high conception 
of honor and of propriety in all things. He loved poetry, 
he loved nature in all her wa}"s, he loved a good horse, 
and in that day this was the itinerant's chief means of 
rapid transit. But above all he loved the right, he loved 
the people, he loved jNIethodism, he loved the world, he 
loved God. His services were in great demand during 
the war, and by voice and pen he labored unceasingly to 
promote the cause of the union and the overthrow of 
secession. Had he entered the field of politics his mag- 
netism and oratory, together with his sterling qualities 
of head and heart and his love for the people, would have 
made him a popular idol. An instance of his loyalty 



to the church and to his high calHng was shown when 
he dechned the office of postmaster at Decatur. 111., which 
was offered to him by President Johnson in recognition 
of his patriotic services during the war. 

Dr. Buck believed in education and Iiad strongly at 
heart the interests of the schools affiliated with his own 
conference. He was a good money raiser and in great 
demand for dedication occasions. He served very effi- 
ciently as financial agent of both Illinois Conference Fe- 
male College and Illinois Wesleyan University. He gave 
$1,240 to the fund of 1862, when he was receiving a 
salary of $800 as pastor of West Charge, Jacksonville. 
The last years of his life he turned over to Illinois Wes- 
leyan University at Bloomington land valued at $27,500 
conditioned upon the university raising $55,000 addi- 
tional for its endowment fund within a specified time. 
The conditions were met and the university got the land. 
He made a similar offer to the Illinois Female College 
in 1892. offering to deed to it 160 acres of land valued 
then at $16,000 (and now worth double the amount), pro- 
vided the college would raise $40,000 additional for the 
endowment fund by commencement day of June, 1893. It 
is greatly to be deplored that for some reason no serious 
efforts seem to have been made to comply with the con- 
ditions and this munificent gift was thus lost to the 
college. A knowledge of this outcome would have 
been a great grief to Dr. Buck, but death spared him this, 
as he was taken shortly after making the offer and months 
before the limitation of time expired, during all of which 
time, however, his widow stood ready and anxious to 
carry the off'er into effect. It was through his sagacity 
and foresight in entering land from the government at 
an early day at $1.25 an acre and holding on to it that 
he was enabled to make these generous offers. Airs. 
Buck, who was his faithful helpmeet and companion for 
forty-six vears, still survives, bria:ht and vivacious in 



spirit and kindly of heart. She abounds in interesting 
reminiscences of the days of long ago and still retains a 
lively interest in the affairs of the church which the sac- 
rifices and long service of an itinerant's wife have made 
dear to her. 

William S. Prentice was raised in Illinois, attended 
the country school, began clerking and at twenty he 
and my uncle constituted the entire clerical force of the 
state auditor's office, then located at Vandalia. He moved 
with the office to Springfield in 1839. He was a lieuten- 
ant-colonel in the state militia and participated conspicu- 
ously with Douglas and Lincoln, both of whom he knew 
well, in the gaieties at the new state capital. He became 
a good business man, his last secular employment being 
that of clerk of the circuit court of Shelby county, Illi- 
nois. It was at Shelbyville that he was converted and 
licensed to preach. He joined the Illinois conference in 
1849 at the age of thirty. 

He was a tall, slender man, having a fine head, a 
kindly face, an intelligent eye and a tender heart. He 
advocated and possessed himself the homely qualities of 
justice, honesty, frankness and fidelity. He was modest 
and unassuming and always had a wide and intimate 
acquaintance with public men and men of affairs. He 
was firm as a rock when need be and always so when a 
question of principle was involved. He had a superior 
mind, was a logical reasoner, analytical and thorough 
in the treatment of every subject. Granting his prem- 
ises, his conclusions were irrefutable, and he had the rare 
faculty of making his statements and expositions stand 
out with such clearness that they seemed to take animate 
tangible form before your eyes and aKvays made a last- 
ing impression. There never was any question as to 
his meaning or of "what he was driving at." He al- 
ways arrested attention, because he always had something 



to say and the young and old, high and low, learned and 
unlearned, understood him. He never felt more highly 
complimented than to have the children go home and tell 
what he had preached about. 

Dr. W. H. H. Adams, of blessed memory, likened 
his sermons to those of John Wesley for lucidity of state- 
ment, logical reasoning and practical application. 

James Leaton, the historian of Illinois Methodism, 
said of Dr. Prentice : "He was a natural presiding elder. 
It is no dispraise of others to say that he possessed the 
presiding elder instinct in a larger share than most men. 
* * * and he was ecclesiastically and morally one of 
the best administrators of discipline in the Illinois con- 
ference. His intellectual quality was very rare; his mind 
was of a practical quality and cast. * * * His ana- 
lytic power was remarkable. His mind was incisive and 
went to the core of the subject. He looked upon every- 
thing from a practical standpoint, and not from a theoret- 
ical, thus causing his judgments to be almost infallible. 
There was no cant about him, no stage effect, no attempt 
at display, but there was clearness of statement, logical 
development of his subject, and a copiousness of illus- 
tration that made him really on his plane a preacher of 
surpassing power. He seemed to seize upon the salient 
points, the very essence and marrow of the truth, and 
so present it that everyone who heard him could not but 
take hold of it and appropriate it. There was an under- 
current of pathos in his preaching which sometimes, when 
his heart was warmed, would burst out in great foun- 
tains of feeling that would move his audience and melt 
them to tears. He was a true man, honorable and up- 
right in everything, a man of action, and having a great 
contempt for meanness in every form." So said Dr. 
Leaton. 

In traveling the district (and he was twenty-four 
years a presiding elder) my father's coming was always 



looked forward to with pleasant anticipation by the 
preachers and the families with whom he stopped. He 
put good cheer into their lives and was a welcome guest 
equally with the children and the grown-ups. He had 
a strong sense of humor, was an admirable story teller 
and when with a company of his brethren for a social 
time, he was the center and leader of jovial good cheer 
and merrymaking ; that is, unless Crane was also pres- 
ent to share the honors. And who ever saw men who 
could have a better time than a set of Methodist preach- 
ers a generation ago? They seemed to be bubbling over 
with good cheer. It was always at the surface ready 
to be tapped upon the slightest provocation. When they 
met the very fact of looking into each other's faces was 
sufficient cause for a hearty laugh, and at the "drop of 
a hat" they would break out into a roar, and when some- 
thing uncommonly funny happened — which it always did 
on these occasions — the clerical hilarity became so boister- 
ous as to very nearly make every one of them a proper 
subject of arrest for disturbance of the peace. 

My father, like Dr. Buck, was also a strong believer 
in the church school and his interest lay principally with 
the two conference schools, the Illinois Female College 
and the Illinois Wesleyan University. I have in my pos- 
session my father's memorandum book, which has an 
account in it called "College Debt." It refers to this 
very indebtedness wdiich was raised in 1862 and reveals 
something of how these preachers raised the ready cash 
with which to pay their large subscriptions. This ac- 
count shows that he borrowed $1,100 from Judge Thomas 
at 10 per cent interest and in 1865 the account was still 
running, having been reduced to about $500. How many 
years it took to pay off this balance I cannot say. In 
1862 he was forty-three years of age, presiding elder of 
Jacksonville district receiving a salary of $750 with a 
family of six to support. These men were not afraid to 



undertake large things and to aid them in carr3-ing out 
their undertakings they were not afraid to borrow money 
and others were not afraid to loan them. 

Buck and Prentice — what a team they were. What 
one could not do the other could, so by joining together 
they seemed to be able to accomplish almost anything. 
One has said of them that Prentice molded the bullets and 
Buck fired them. True it is that they were born leaders 
of men, not by self-assertion, for they were both too mod- 
est and loyal for that, but by common consent they were 
chosen such by their brethren, who looked to them for 
leadership, and with men of their mold it would have been 
so in any walk of life. They belonged to that remarkable 
coterie of men whose strength of administration and lead- 
ership is still an abiding force and a living inspiration as 
well as a cherished memory. Their counsel was sought by 
bishops, editors and high church officials as well as by 
those high in state. They commanded universal respect 
and confidence and had no small share in giving to the 
Illinois conference a standing and prestige that were rec- 
ognized throughout the entire connection as among the 
very highest. 

These two men were boon companions for nearly forty 
years and their lives were so welded together that one 
seemed a part of the other. Had Buck had a son he 
no doubt would have named him William Prentice jusf 
as Prentice named his son Hiram Buck, little realizing 
the impossible task which was thus imposed upon the in- 
nocent subject of properly maintaining in later years the 
dignity of their combined great names or of represent- 
ing all that they stand for. Beecher said : "In friend- 
ship your heart is like a bell struck every time your friend 
is in trouble." Their friendship was this and it was 
more. They stood by each other at all times whether 
it be in joy or in <5orrow, in health or in sickness, in tri- 



42.576 



umph or in distress. They were inseparable — a beautiful 
friendship that made them one in purpose, one in heart, 
typifying the blending of spirits in the realm beyond to 
which they have gone and, whither, let us trust, our 
footsteps too are tending. Shall we ever see their like 
again ? 

THE TIMES. 

And now to the days of '62 and something about the 
conditions then existing. This period was not only a 
period of dark days for the college, but of dark days 
for our country — the darkest through which it has ever 
passed — for during four years of this decade the great 
civil war was raging and for the remainder of the dec- 
ade the country was struggling to recover from the pros- 
tration brought about by the war. The census of i860 
gives Illinois a population of 1,711.951, Chicago 109.260. 
Springfield 9,320 and Jacksonville 5,528, so that com- 
pared with today the state was sparsely settled. Abra- 
ham Lincoln was president and Richard Yates was war 
governor. The war was the absorbing topic of the times 
and party feeling ran high. Cartwright, Buck, Prentice 
and Crane were Democrats, and although differing in 
politics from the great majority of their brethren they 
were accorded continued leadership by them throughout 
this trying period. They were "war Democrats" and no 
more loyal and effective service was rendered than that 
given by these men in their efforts to maintain the union. 
Crane went out with U. S. Grant as chaplain of his regi- 
ment. The others by their speeches and influence were 
untiring in their efforts to hold Illinois true to the union 
— and it is a well known fact of history that there was a 
time when Illinois was trembling in the balance with the 
impending danger of becoming a state divided against 
itself. At this time Prentice, who had long been a close 



friend of Stephen A. Douglas, sent word to the senator 
at Washington urging him to come out to Ilhnois and 
use his influence to stem the tide of disloyalty that was 
setting in. Senator Douglas at once went to see the 
president. Mr. Lincoln advised him to go. He did so 
and with patriotic fervor urged the people to support 
the administration and rally round the flag. They were 
obedient to his call. The state was solidified for the 
union and never thereafter was the loyalty of its united 
people called in question. This was in 1861. Other 
well known members of the conference whom I call to 
mind and who attained distinction in the field are Jesse 
H. Moore, J. F. Jaquess, the first president of Illinois 
Female College, and Allen Buckner, each of whom com- 
manded a regiment. W. J. Rutledge, R. E. Guthrie, E. 
D. Wilkin, Preston Wood and quite a number of others 
went into the army as chaplains. 

The conference minutes of 1862 show a decrease of 
membership for the year of 725, the total membership 
of the conference being 26,800, as against about 85,000 
now. This decrease no doubt reflected the deleterious 
influence of the war excitement and evidently applied not 
only to the church, but to schools, trade, commerce and 
industries of every kind. These facts about the war I 
mention principally to show the distracting, prostrating 
and blighting influence that the founders of 1862 had to 
encounter in their endeavors to carry on the work of 
the church and of its colleges. They were up against 
stern realities, and things had come to such a pass that 
they were facing the question not "how" much can we 
advance and go forward this year," which is always 
the slogan of the Methodist preacher, but "what can 
we do to keep things together and hold our own." 
Truly they . were beset by "fightings without and fears 
within," and because of this that which they accom- 
plished was all the more noteworthy and remarkable. 



Al51b 



FOUNDERS AND CONTEMPORARIES. 

And now something of other characters who made up 
the Hfe and entered into the activities of these stirring 
and historic days. Who were they? I cannot hope to 
mention all, for this would mean to call the roll of the 
entire conference at that time. I can only give a few, 
ai4£l these such as most of you, with me, will remember 
either from acquaintance or by reputation. 

First and foremost, of course, comes Peter Cart- 
wright^ claimed by all Methodism, then sevent)^*even 
years of age and presiding elder of the Springfield dis- 
trict. He continued in active service until 1869 and di^d 
in 1872. His was a remarkable career. -When w^e con- 
sider that he was born six years before John Wesley 
died, and that most of us were born before Cartwright 
died, and today are witnessing and enjoying some of the 
harvest of his planting, it seems to bridge over the seem- 
ingly far stretching expanse between us and the great 
founder of Methodism and to make us feel a little nearer 
to him, and as it were, to feel the touch of his spirit, 
which was ever concerned for the welfare of education, 
and which spirit Cartwright and his contemporaries so 
faithfully cherished and passed on down to their succes- 
sors even to the present day and hour. In 1862 Peter 
Cartwright gave $1,000 to the college. His salary for 
the preceding year was $500. 

Then comes Peter Akers, at this time seventy-two 
years of age. He was not then a member of the Illinois 
conference, having transferred some time before, I think 
to the Southern Illinois conference, but transferred back 
to the Illinois conference later. He was an original 
founder of the college and probably was the most noted 
member the conference ever had, excepting Cartwright. 
He was profoundly learned in the Bible and had a church- 



wide reputation as an expositor of the Scriptures. He 
is credited or rather debited with preaching sermons three 
and four hours long. What was a credit in this respect 
in those days is a decided debit in these. 

At this time Dr. Charles Adams was president of 
the college. He held this position from 1858 to 1868. 
He was a talented, courteous and genial Christian gentle- 
man and at this time was fifty-four years of age. 

Rev. George Rutledge was a lovable man, a good 
preacher and stood high in the conference. At this time 
he had just been assigned to the Bloomington district. 
His salary for the preceding year was $642 and he sub- 
scribed in 1862 $2,000 to the college. 

Rev. Collin D. James at this time was fifty-four 
years old and was just finishing up a year's service as 
financial agent of the college. He is credited with giving 
$1,400 to the college in 1862, and that year was sent 
to Old Town, Bloomington district, where the salary paid 
the year before was $600, so it is an easy problem in 
mental arithmetic to figure that he could not pay his 
subscription that year. 

Then there was W. D. R. Trotter, presiding elder 
of Paris district, at that time fifty-five years of age. He 
was an original founder, but not on the list of 1862. He 
was an able man, a genial companion and a fine preacher. 
He was the first editor and publisher of the Central Chris- 
tian Advocate, which enterprise, however, caused him 
financial loss from which he never recovered. 

The laymen who were among the founders of 1862 
are Judge William Thomas, John Mathers, Mat- 
thew Stacy, John A. Chesnut, Thomas J. Larimore, 
James H. Lurton and Judge William Brown. John 
A. Chesnut was a Springfield man, formerly of Carlin- 



42.5T6 



ville, and the others Uved in Jacksonville. These men 
all evidenced their loyalty to and interest in the college 
by giving liberally to the fund of 1862 : Thomas, $5,100; 
Mathers, $3,225; Stacy, $2,700; Chesnut, $1,750; 
Larimore, $1,600; LuRTON, $1,400; Brown, $1,600. I 
am of the impression that these Jacksonville laymen were 
the great financial power back of the college movement. 
Judge Thomas and John Mathers not only gave lib- 
erally themselves, but must have underwritten a large 
part of the preachers' subscriptions. I am led to think 
so because I have among my father's papers an old can- 
celled note given by him to Judge Thomas which John 
AIathers had signed as security. Judge Thomas, if not 
then, became afterwards the foremost layman in the 
conference and as such was sent as a lay delegate to the 
general conference of 1872, the first to admit lay dele- 
gates. His colleague was Joseph G. English of Dan- 
ville. John A. Chesnut stood high as a layman and 
was a rare Christian gentleman. He was elected a dele- 
gate to the general conference of 1876, together with 
Judge W. J. Henry of Danville. In those days the con- 
ference was only allowed to send two lay delegates, so 
that the honor was of much higher import than at the 
present time. 

Then there is Rev. Newton Cloud credited with $700 
to the fund of 1862. That year he was sent to Roches- 
ter, where the salary was $425. Xewton Cloud was a 
man of more than ordinary ability and prominence. He 
had been president of the constitutional convention of 
1847, whose acts were adopted by a vote of the people of 
the state of Illinois in the following year and known as 
the constitution of 1848. 

James L. Crane in 1862 was sent from East Charge, 
Jacksonville, to Springfield First church, at the age of 



thirty-nine. The salary was $i,ooo, the highest in the 
conference, but with a family of five husky, ravenous 
boys to feed, whom I knew as brothers, he could not 
have saved very much towards liquidating his subscrip- 
tion of $375. The very thought of James L. Crane pro- 
vokes a smile of tender regard with all who bring his 
kindly face to mind. Looking down the long list of noble 
names that grace the history of Illinois conference his 
name looms high up among the greatest and the best. He 
was the embodiment of tact, humor, gentleness, and of 
forceful efficiency, and with Buck and Prentice formed 
a trio of genial spirits whose close companionship became 
a center of consecrated good fellowship, from which 
radiated influences that brightened and cheered, and gave 
to their brethren a relaxation from the sterner duties of 
the itinerancy, adding a zest to the preacher's daily task 
that stimulated and inspired them to their best efforts. 

Then R. W. Travis gave $500. He was then forty- 
three years of age and presiding elder of Decatur dis- 
trict, a good preacher and a man of great force. 

W. J. RuTLEDGE gave $500, was then forty-two years 
of age and chaplain of 14th Illinois Volunteers. He was 
an original founder, a jovial man and true, always bris- 
tling with ideas which seemed to be dancing and prancing, 
impatient for utterance, until thev came tumbling over 
each other from his ever ready lips. 

J. C. RucKER gave $500, about $100 more than his 
salary at Waynesville, where he was sent. 

W. H. H. Moore, presiding elder of Danville District, 
gave $400. He was then in his prime, forty-eight years 
of age. 

William H. Webster, now a revered father in the 
conference, was then a young man of twenty-seven and 



M^li> 



moved this year from Island Grove to Champaign. In 
the last year he had received a salary of $253, but sent 
up $40 for the fund of 1862. 

W. N. McElroy, destined later to become a leader 
in the conference and its historian, was then thirty years 
of age and that year was sent to Naples to get rich on 
$450 a year. 

Preston Wood at thirty-seven had returned from 
the army and was sent to Clinton. Another genial soul 
and sterling character with unusual gifts as a presiding 
elder and one who served the conference faithfully and 
well in all the varied duties imposed upon him. 

William McK. McElfresh, the lovable, who had 
the esteem and confidence of all his brethren, was then 
thirty-seven years of age and stationed at Waverly, re- 
moving that year from Winchester, where his salary was 

$520. 

E. W. Phillips, the superb, was then thirty-five years 
of age, but did not transfer into the Illinois conference 
until some years later. 

W. E. Short, afterwards the honored president of 
the college, was then thirty-three years of age and that 
year was moved from Waverly to Winchester with his 
wife and little brood of three children, where they lived 
happily on a salary of $500. His name is not recorded 
in the list of '62, but it is a matter of historical record 
that he afterwards gave eighteen of the best years of 
his life to the college and lives today in the lives of 
scores who have gone out from its doors with his bless- 
ing into all parts of the land. 

Reuben Andrus, the second president of the college, 
in 1862 was sent from Springfield to Bloomington sta- 
tion, where the salary was about $700. 



The list of 1862 credits Joseph Capps with giving 
$100. If this represents in full his aid to the college at 
that time you nia_v rest assured that this is all he was able 
to give, but the host of his posterity that have risen up 
to call him blessed have been no small gift to the church 
and to the world, and his influence and presence through 
them are still with us. Besides, the wheels of industry 
which he set in motion are still running, giving to the 
scores who watch over their workings the blessings of 
contentment and happy homes ; and the fruit of the looms 
are also being distributed broadcast over the land to 
comfort and to bless. Verily may it be said of such, 
"their works do follow them." 

Wesley Mathers' name is not on the list of sub- 
scribers to the fund of 1862, and yet will any one say that 
he was wanting in any good word or work? If at this 
particular time his name is not in evidence there is cer- 
tainly some good reason for it, for he and his brother, 
John, were always faithful and true and liberal to all 
good causes. 

Then the name of Jonathan Stamper does not ap- 
pear, yet will any one sav that this godly man and great 
preacher was indifferent to any of the church's enter- 
prises ? 

And then what about the wives of these preachers 
who had mortgaged years of the future in order that 
the college might be saved, and who through all these 
years, loyal helpmeets as they were, stinted themselves 
and uncomplainingly accepted plain living and scant cloth- 
ing for themselves and children ? And what of the wives 
and mothers who had willingly, though sorrowfully, hand- 
ed their loved ones over to their country, to march ofif 
to the field of battle, while they remained at home to look 
after the farm and the little ones, and whose prayers and 



Al^lb 



pennies, being all they had to give, cast these into the 
treasury even as the widow who gave her mite? These 
cannot be excluded — they must not be — but rather would 
we, if only their names were known, place them high up 
on the list of those whom we are gathered today to honor. 
The true founders of any good cause born in adversity 
and trial are not made by printer's ink nor are they cre- 
ated by any line or standard of monetary demarkation. 
True, a rich man may give a large sum of money for the 
founding of a very worthy object, a thing to be commend- 
ed and encouraged, even if it does sometimes seem to be 
like buying a monument, but where, as in 1862, it has 
taken tears and prayers and hardships and denials as 
well as money, then none who have contributed any 
of these are to be excluded as founders, for it took all 
of these things to make the foundation sure. So to- 
day we would open wide our arms to receive all such of 
the days of '62 without distinction, and bid them make 
merry with us, as we rejoice together in the work that 
they have done. 

WHAT THEY ACCOMPLISHED. 

As with some books, it is necessary to devote most 
of the pages to a description of the environments and 
setting in order to bring out the full force of the teach- 
ing or story, so I have fovmd it necessary to describe with 
some detail the conditions existing fifty years ago as a 
preface to the brief application which I shall make of 
my subject. Having shown something of the unusual 
and trying conditions of those days and something of the 
men who were on the scene of action then, it only re- 
mains, before entering upon an application of the sub- 
ject, to inquire what it was that these men of 1862 ac- 
complished to make their deeds worthy of special com- 
memoration and celebration. I know of nothing that 



will more fully and fittingly answer this inquiry than the 
report of John Mathers, treasurer of the college at that 
time, and which was regarded as so eventful that it was 
ordered printed in the conference minutes of 1862. It 
is as follows : 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF ILLINOIS CONFERENCE 
FEMALE COLLEGE. 

I take great pleasure in being able to announce to the Illinois 
Conference the pleasing fact that the college is out of debt. On 
the first day of October, 1861, the liabilities of the institution, 
principal and interest to that date, amounted to nearly thirty-six 
thousand dollars. It was supposed that the available assets or 
notes belonging to the college would, if collected, reduce the 
indebtedness to thirty thousand dollars. Shortly after the ap- 
pointment of Brother James as agent, a meeting of the trustees 
was called, at which time the pecuniary condition of the institu- 
tion as above stated was presented for their consideration. The 
questions then and there discussed were, shall we sell the college? 
or shall we make one more effort to save the institution to the 
church? The final conclusion was in favor of the effort to save, 
and with a view to this the board proposed, and urged upon the 
treasurer, to agree to pay or assume all indebtedness of the col- 
lege over thirty thousand dollars, in consideration of which they 
would assign to him all the notes due the institution. The ,^ 
treasurer, though reluctantly, accepted this proposition. The 
trustees then agreed to pay two-thirds of the remaining thirty 
thousand dollars, provided the additional ten thousand could be 
secured by the sale of Ashland lots, or otherwise, prior to the 
first of October, 1862. The agent and treasurer during the past 
year exerted themselves to raise the desired amount prior to 
said date ; but as the year passed away it became evident that 
this could not be done outside of the board of trustees, and 
knowing that the twenty thousand dollars and additional small 
subscriptions obtained would all be forfeited on the first of 
October unless the whole amount was secured before that date, 
three different meetings of the board were convened during last 
month, and after a hard but united effort on the part of the 
trustees, the much desired sum was finally secured by contri- 
butions and sale of Ashland lots, as follows, and by the following 
persons : 



42.576 



(Here fo-llows a list of subscriptions of 35 names aggregating 
$30,180.) 

It will be seen upon examination that those who have been 
and are now trustees of the college, and who are personally 
bound for the debts of the institution, have contributed the whole 
amount of said $30,000. except $1,230. It will also be seen that 
a few members of this conference have contributed over nine 
thousand dollars of this debt, a number of whom will not be 
able to meet their obligations except at the sacrifice of nearly 
everything they are worth. Now, Brethren, is this right? Why 
should they suffer so much? Does the institution belong to 
them ? Certainly not. By the official act of your body and the 
legislature it is the "Illinois Conference Female College." The 
trustees have been appointed by this body. They have acted in 
good faith, without fee or reward, as your agents ; and j^ou are 
as much bound, in a moral point of view, to pay your proportion 
of this debt as they are. And now. Brethren, I close this report 
by asking, will you stand by and see the members of your own 
body suffer without lending them the least assistance? I hope 
not. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

John Mathers, Treasurer. 

WHY THEY SUCCEEDED. 

It should be remembered that this was only one of the 
burdens these men had to carry. Other colleges were 
also having problems which these same preachers must 
help to solve, then their missionary and benevolent col- 
lections must be looked after and the work of their 
charges and districts not allowed to lag. How could they 
under all these conditions accomplish what they did? In 
the first place they could do it because they were heroes. 
In the second place, I am firmly convinced that one secret 
of their strength and of their ability to cause things to 
come to pass, lay largely in the fact that they were united 
.in purpose, without jealousies, not self-seekers, and al- 
ways ready to put forward the one who could best repre- 
sent them or accomplish the thing at hand ; preserving 
among themselves a feeling of good fellowship that made 



for happy and effective service, and these taken aho- 
gether forming a cohesive force that was irresistible, and 
thus united in spirit and all pulling together as one man, 
obstacles and difficulties gave way before them as before 
a mighty army and victory was theirs. 

OUR HOMAGE THEIR DUE. 

Having now seen what they accomplished, and under 
what extremely adverse and discouraging conditions, need 
anything further be said to show that they are entitled to 
our everlasting gratitude, homage and praise? Surely 
their deeds are their sufficient praise, and yet it is ours 
to do them tribute. As I have thought over their deeds, 
the word homage in the sense of doing obeisance has ap- 
pealed to me more nearly than any other as expressing 
the proper regard due them. And therefore it is that I 
took for the subject of this paper "Our Homage to the 
Past." 

As the vassal in olden times paid homage to his supe- 
rior lord— so we, acknowledging the superior talents, for- 
titude, courage and faith of these men of the "Sixties," 
gladly and loyally do homage to them and to the great 
work they have done in so heroically battling against the 
adversities that beset them. As the word "homage" 
comes down to us ladened with the aroma of feudal days, 
perhaps the use of a more modernized and Americanized 
expression would better indicate the thought. I mean 
that we of today may well "take off our hats" in honor 
of the men of fifty years ago, and in respectful regard 
make deferential obeisance to their memory. It was their 
faith, their tenacity and persistence and their indefatiga- 
ble labors that saved the day in the dark hours of ap- 
parent defeat and saved to the future the life of a college 
which ever since has been pouring forth its streams of 
blessings into lives and homes all over this land. 



Al^lb 



COLLEGE A WORTHY MONUMENT. 

A college such as this may well be likened to the sun, 
constantly sending out its rays of blessings and brightness 
to purify and enlighten everything that comes within its 
influence, and that without diminishing in the least its own 
inherent power. Ever giving, never losing. But, unlike 
the sun, such a school throws ofif annually little suns, 
scattering them broadcast over the land, thus forming 
new centers from which to radiate the borrowed light of 
their Alma Mater with which they have been surcharged, 
and to permeate the world with the benign influences of 
Christian Womanhood. Verily the fathers planted wisely 
in planting such a school as this. Did they plant more 
wisely than they knew ? We of today shall do well if in 
taking up the work which they have laid down, we shall 
carry it on in a way worthy of them and of their sacrifices, 
and also worthy of the zeal and devotion and successful 
labors of those who have followed them down to the pres- 
ent time ; and yet it is not an unworthy ambition to hope 
for a future so glorious and so far beyond their brightest 
conceptions and ours that it may yet be said of all of them, 
"they builded better than they knew." And may we 
not indulge the further hope that, with the past looking 
down upon us and the future beckoning on, we of the 
present may so dedicate ourselves to the duties before us 
that we also may claim to have had some little share and 
part in earnestly endeavoring to bring about these higher 
hopes and aims. 

These men with prophetic vision looked down the vista 
of the years and heard the cry of the young womanhood 
of today and of the days to come, and planted here in 
the heart of the great Central Valley of the nation a 
school they hoped would meet that cry, and in fulfillment 
of that hope there stands today this splendid monument 
to the labors and foresight of these noble founders and 
their worthv successors. 



SALUTATION AND TRIBUTE. 

Looking back into the dim distant past of fifty years 
ago, we see their heroic forms and faces, their struggles 
and at times their well nigh hopeless task, their indom- 
itable courage, their sacrifices, their stern grapple with 
impending defeat — and across this long expanse of years 
we wave salute : 

Brave heroes of departed years. 
All Hail ! Thy work, though sown in tears, 
Hath brought a harvest rich indeed. 
And now full praise shall be thy meed. 

The precious seed thus sown by thee 
Are great sheaves now, couldst thou but see. 
Rejoicing we would now thee greet 
And lay them at the sower's feet. 

The inspiration of thy day ^ 

Still lingers with us, and we pray 
That worthy we may be of thee 
Whose labors spell sublimity. 

Great souls, great hearts, great men of God, 
Who quailed not under chastening rod 
Of hardship's task, knew not despair, 
Knew nothing but to do and dare 

When duty called and God did show 
Wherein He'd have thy footsteps go, 
Despising naught but fail of gain. 
All Hail ! thy work was not in vain. 



42.576 



^be CoUeoe Greetings 

iJlThe College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 
ffjContributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month 

€|Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies 15c. 
€|Kntered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 



Contents 

Editorial 3 

Opening Chapel Exercises 5 

W. T. K. Club Meeting 5 

Alumnae Notes 6 

Faculty Notes 7 

Station Glimpses 8 

The First Night af Home 10 

The First Day of Vacation 11 

Her Welcome 11 

On the Beach 14 

A July Parade . 15 

Billy's Sunday Afternoon 15 

The Flight of Wild Geese 17 

A Bargain Sale 17 

At the Ball Game 18 

In a Balcony 19 

The Frog Pond 11 

Her Devotees 11 

A Wester Plain 13 

Heiury I^foiiTer ILiibrary 

JiLOKltSOlXVliKJ, liIil».ois5 

42.576 



n 



m 



3D DC 



I 



I 




D D 




XLbc ColicQC (greetinge 

Vol. XV. Jacksonville, 111., October, 191 1 No. 1 

Faculty Committee — Miee Weaver, Miss Tanner, Miss Anderson 
Editor — Janette C. Powell 

Associate Editoks — Louise Gates, Helen Moore 
Society-Department Reporteb — Edith Lyles 

Business Managers — Annette Rearick, Mjrtle Walker, Marian 
lyombard. 



After the confusion of unpacking, of meeting room- 
mates, arranging schedules and finding class rooms, at last 
there is time to learn of the various college organizations, 
organizations that make for the life of the College. The 
literary societies, the musical clubs, the Y. W. C. A. and 
the athletic association offer the best of opportunities for 
activities along many lines. Each of these has made its 
own plea to old and new students. The choice has de- 
pended on what most interests the individual. In present- 
ing the College Greetings, however, there is a common 
bond, for the college paper is vitally connected with all 
that is best in college interests. It is the reflector of the 
truest college spirit, for, its interests are not along one line 
of activity, but along all lines. It is not confined to one 
department or one class. All departments are given due 
recognition; all classes are interested in the making of a 
paper in keeping with the general success of I. W. C. 
The staff invites each of its readers to give advice freely, 
to make suggestions, and above all to contribute stories, 
sketches, essays or poems. Upon the hearty co-operation 
of the entire student body, not on the efforts of the Greet- 
ings board, does the success of the paper depend. To sub- 
scribe shows a certain amount of interest, but to aid in the 
making of a vital chronicle is by far the better way of as- 
sisting. In this, the first number of the present school 
y^ar, the staff wishes to extend to all the heartiest of 

Page Three 




The College Greetings 



^^ 



"Greetings" and to urge again the sincere help of each 
one of its subscribers to make this year's Greetings the 
very best of all the years. 



When the unrest of the opening days has given place to 
usual order, recitations are attended, societies are visited, 
clubs are organized, and a general good time is the happy 
result. Enthusiasm runs high over each last function. 
Rivalry of the friendliest kind results in the cleverest of 
entertainments for the new girls' amusement, as society or 
class endeavors to make her feel at home. For a number 
of years it has been the pride of all that such rivaly has 
been kept entirely friendly, a rivalry that roused college 
loyalty, not partisan antagonism. However, there is dan- 
ger in rivalry of the friendliest kind becoming a little bit- 
ter. It is but natural that limits are easily overstepped, 
that almost unconsciously the spirit of emulation should 
result in ill feelings and petty jealousies. The temptation 
does not, however, justify the offense. In some college 
function, because one class or society may be stronger than 
its sister organization, is no adequate reason why the 
stronger should be self-congratulatory, or the lesser should 
lose her college spirit. The beginning of the year pre- 
sents many opportunities for a display of college spirit, 
hence the greater danger of division and the greater need 
of unity. 

Each student, each class, each society, is anxious to 
make the best possible impression. To do so and be per- 
fectly fair to other factions is not always easy. The sim- 
plest way of praising your own pet project is to tell what 
your sister organization lacks. Yet the spirit pervading 
the separate organization will inevitably make or mar the 
college spirit, whether it shall rise to a dignity in keeping 
with I, W. C.'s, or shall sink to the level of petty indig- 
nities, rests entirely with the student body. 

Page Four 




The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 



W^ 



THE OPENING CHAPEL EXERCISES 

The old order changeth and giveth place to the new. 
And it was with a feeling of both regret and pleasure that 
we met in Music Hall for our chapel services on the open- 
ing day of school. The joy of what the thing meant over- 
shadowed the regret we felt in leaving the old chapel. Dr. 
Harker, in his greetings to the girls, struck the notes 
which will resound through many years. "A college is a 
placeof study, of health, of friendships, of religion. Or of ap- 
plication, inspiration, consecration, fitting into our college 
motto: Knowledge (which is allied with application) ; Faith 
)which comes through inspiration), and Service (which 
is the direct result of consecration) . " It was the first time 
the girls had welcomed Dr. Pitner as president of the board 
of trustees, and his "Strike firm and be happy" came with 
an especial force to the old as well as the new girls. Every 
one knew that the "happy habit" emphasized by Mrs. 
I^ambert ought to be the motto of every student's life. 

And the music of the morning blended and harmonized 
into the atmosphere of the whole, giving a bright promise 
of the coming days. 



W. T, K. CLUB MEETING 

The Greeley (Colo.) Republican has the following men- 
tion of an honored graduate of I. W. C. Mrs. Vincent 
was in the class of '55: 

The members of the W. T. K. Club met at the assembly 
room of the city library for their regular meeting. There 
were a number of guests present to hear the excellent pa- 
pers which were presented. Mrs. B. T. Vincent, of Denver, 
was the guest of honor and gave a paper on "Did the 
Growth of Christianity Give an Impulse to Feminine In- 
dividualism"? Mrs. Charles B. Phelps followed with a 
paper on "The Heroism of Modern Women in Russia". 

Page Five 




The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 



Following the program a social hour was spent by the 
ladies and their guests, and light refreshments were served. 
Mrs. W. B. Starr's paper was on "Impulses Toward Free- 
dom in the Orient". 



ALUMNA NOTES 

A reunion of the class of 191 1 would call girls of many 
occupations from scattered places. Of the College Seniors, 
only one is teaching — ^Jessie Kennedy, who has the history 
and English in the high school at Roodhouse. Gladys 
lycavell is studying for a master's degree at Chicago Uni- 
versity. Gladys Henson, Mildred West and Ninah Wag- 
ner are at home. 

Two of the class of 191 1 are teaching at I. W. C. : Lou- 
ise Miller and Bess Breckon. 

Of the graduates of the College of Music, Edna Foucht 
and Edna Sheppard are teaching with Prof, and Mrs. Stead 
in the Peoria College of Music. 

Edith Robinson is teachihg at home, while Geraldine 
Sieber, Irene Worcester and Harriet Walker are continu- 
ing their studies. 

Clara Moore is in Brussels, Belgium, doing advanced 
v/ork on the violin. 

Millicent Rowe, of the School of Expression, will study 
in Boston this winter. 

Mrs. Tess Templar McMillan, '89, with her husband and 
five daughters, are changing their home from Hutchinson, 
Kan., to Seattle, Wash. 

Mrs. Leda Ellsberry Bird, '05, has the happiness of a 
daughter, Dorothy. 

Of the School of Home Economics, Marjorie Gamble will 
teach in the high school at Greenfield. Ruth Patterson is 
Page Six 



The C o 1 1 e p- e Greetin&s 



assistant iu the Domestic Science department at I^awrence, 
Kan. Nelle Reaugh has charge of the Domestic Science 
at CoUinsville. Katherine Wainright is teaching in East 
St. Ivouis. Anna Jenkins and Hazel Parks, at present, are 
at home. 



FACULTY NOTES 

On Saturday night, Sept. i6, Miss Weaver entertained 
most delightfully in honor of the new members of our fac- 
ulty and to welcome back to I. W. C. Miss Neville, who 
returns to us after a year's absence, spent in Egypt and the 
Holy lyand. 

Among the new members of the faculty are Miss Fannie 
Ensminger Wakely, A. M., of Indiana University, who 
will teach I^atin; Miss I^ela M. Wright, Ph. B., of the 
University of Chicago, who will teach German and mathe- 
matics in the Academy, and Miss Helen Haldy, A. B., of 
Ohio State University, who is to teach geology and chem- 
istry. 

The new director of the College of Music is Mr. Max 
van L/. Swarthout, who for a number of years was a stu- 
dent in the Royal Conservatory of Music in lyeipzig, Ger- 
many. While there, he was also one of the first violins in 
the Gewandhaus orchestra, under Arthur Nikisch. For 
the past six years he has been director of the Oxford Col- 
lege of Music. 

The associate director, Mr. Donald M. Swarthout, also 
studied in the Royal Conservatory in I^eipzig, and the 
year igoS-'oy was spent in Paris under Isador Phillip. This 
past year he and his wife were in Europe, where he was 

again at the Royal Conservatory, making his Pruefung in 
piano last spring. He has been associated with his brother 
in the Oxford College of Music. 

Miss Grace Nicholson,, teacher of piano, comes from the 

Page Seven 




The College Greeting's 

New Eugland Conservatory with especial honors. She 
was awarded the prize last year, offered by the Mason & 
Hamlin Company, in the contest where the judges were 
Max Fiedler, Arthur Foote and George W. Chadwick. 
She was especially praised because of her tone coloring, 
technique and interpretation. 

Miss Louise Miller, of our own College of Music, will 
teach voice and piano. Her unusual ability and her expe- 
rience in teaching make her a welcome addition to our 
music department. 

Miss Louisa Loveday, of the Columbia College of Ex- 
pression, will be assistant in the department of expres- 
sion. 

Miss Lucy H. Gillett, our new director of home eco- 
nomics, is a graduate of Pratt Institute, and has done 
special work at Teachers' College. For five years she has 
been a teacher in Pratt Institute. She will be assisted by 
Miss Ruth Gray, of the Pratt Institute, and Miss Bess 
Breckon, of the home economics department of I. W. C. 

We are glad to welcome back Miss Mary Anderson and 
Miss Laura Tanner after a delightful summer abroad. 



STATION GLIMPSES 

Planting a last kiss on the little mother's lips, a girl in 
black flew down the steps to the waiting carriage, and a 
strong arm thrust her into the back seat. Clapping him- 
self and the suit-case into the front, the man seized the 
lines and waived the whip in the air. Down the hill they 
rattled, the little sorrel bending forward eagerly, straining 
every nerve in answer to the quick commands. Houses 
flew past, blurred in the clouds of dust; children, chick- 
ens, dogs scattered wildly before the reckless flight. The 
carriage swerved as it swung round the last corner and 
rumbled over the quarter-mile bridge. At last, they were 

Page EigM 



The C o 1 1 e s" € G r e e t i n o 



in sight — could see the big engine puffing, blowing, col- 
lecting its mighty strength for a fresh lunge. Two yards 
more — but they heard the bell, that fatal signal; saw the 
brakeman methodically raise that trained hand. Breath- 
less, panting, the carriage lurched to the sration platform, 
the man in the front seat waving frantically; the girl in the 
back, tense, ready to vault the wheel. The man turned 
spasmodically. 

"Out, quick! He's seen and's holding her"! 

A suit-case was thrust in the girl's face, the gruff words 
"All aboard" rang in her ears; and limp and wilted, she 
clambered up the narrow steps. B. H. 

^^ 
WW 

Alice and I waited expectantly until the last passenger 
was off the train, but the girls we were to meet did not 
come. As we walked slowly away, chattering about the 
various reasons that could have kept them at home, a lady 
with red cheeks and blonde curls bustled past us. She 
was coaxing along a white poodle that seemed determined 
to take an opposite direction. We stopped, for Alice and I 
thought that in all her flutter the lady was not conscious 
that the bell was ringing and the flagman had called out, 
for the third time, "All aboard"! 

She turned to the one cabman left, to inquire, "This 
train's ahead of time, isn't it"? 

The cabman gave a wave of his hand as he said: 

"Hurry on, or you're left"! and then he turned away, 
chuckling, "Stoppin' to ask if a train's ahead of time 
when the thing's leavin'. That's a woman for you — one 
of her sort, anyway". 

By two jerks the dog was made to understand that there 
was no time for foolishness. Yelping furiously, he swung 
in mid air as his mistress tumbled up the steps of the car. 

K.J. A., '13. 

Page Niue 




The College Greeting's 



I was sitting in the station depot, restlessly waiting for 
my train, which the agent told me, in a sharp tone, was 
half an hour late. lyistlessly looking out of the window near 
me, I saw, coming up the main street, a small fat man sway- 
ing from one side of the walk to the other, in his efforts to 
run. In each hand he had a suit-case. Both of them 
were almost as large as he. In a few moments there was 
a thud against the station door, which came open with 
such force that the little man almost toppled over. He did 
not even take time to drop the suit-cases, but ran, puflSng, 
up rn front of the ticket office. 

"One — to Chicago", he gasped in short breaths. "That's 
my train there — ", and was in the waiting room again. 

"No", called the agent, "that's the ", but the ex- 
cited man was out of the door and running down the walk 
with his head thrown back and every muscle strained to 
make his legs move faster. 

By this time everybody in the station was interestedly 
looking to see what would happen. 

He reached the train just as the porter was calling, 
"Jacksonville, Quincy and •" 

"What"! we could hear the man yell. "Isn't this the 
C. & A.? What does this mean"? 

"No", came the calm reply from the porter as he hopped 
on the train. i "You're half an hour early, that's all"! 

B. S. 



THE FIRST NIGHT AT HOME 

lyovingly and almost appealing, she squeezed the hand 
of the little sister who snuggled up close to her, whisper- 
ing good-night. I^ong after the house was still, save the 
quiet breathing of the child, she lay there staring un- 
ceasingly at the shadowy ceiling. Now there was no im- 
pulse td choke back that aching lump, to stifle her real self 
by an affected air of cheerfulness, for there were no girls 
Page Ten 



The College G r e e i i n g- s 



to be deceived into cheery farewells, no family from whom 
she must conceal the broken ties binding her to school. 
Memories of friendships clouded the air with faces, happy 
and sad, each tightening the lump which was growing 
larger and larger. A sob broke the stillness, a sob which 
the darkness strove to temper, deceiving the child stirring 
in its sleep. E. M. 

WEISS' 

THE FIRST DAY OF VACATION 

I awoke early the first day of vacation and found, to my 
surprise, that the tired feeling which I had planned to in- 
dulge was gone. With a whoop at the remembrance of 
the day I jumped out of bed, carrying with me a portion of 
the bed clothes in my efforts to arouse Helen and Frances. 
All up and dressed, we went to the rear of the yard and 
dug a hole. Helen and Frances came struggling with 
arms full of books, which they flung joyfully into the 
hole. In ten minutes the heap was in a blaze, and we 
were dancing around it like Indians. In fact, such a scene 
would have made the best dancer among them envious. 
We swayed, crouched, jumped, chanted and yelled. 

Soon all was a blackened heap. Strange to say, as 
we looked at the ruins of knowledge, we became quiet. 
We dared not look at one another for fear of detec- 
tion in tell-tale eyes. Helen was the first to break the 
silence. 

"After all, girls, this year hasn't been so bad. I'll 
admit I liked English in spite of myself". 

"Math, wasn't so awful, either", agreed Frances. 

G. U., '14. 



WW 

HER WELCOME 

Grace set her suit-case on the floor and extended her 
hand to the kindly lady receiving her so graciously. 

Page Eleven 



^^ 



The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeti^ig's 




"You're Miss Ells", she heard her saying, "and proba- 
bly want to go right up to your room. Miss Learner", 
turning to a tall girl in brown, "take Miss Ells up to room 
127, please". 

With a nod and a smile, the little lady bustled away and 
Grace watched her, wondering whom she could be. Then, 
as a long arm swooped up her suit-case, and the tall girl 
said, "This way", she followed — up flights of stairs and 
down corridors; turning, now here, now there, until she 
felt dizzy with it all. 

"Here you are! This is 127". 

The brown girl opened the door, dropped the suit-case 
and vanished, while Grace, hearing the words, "Hand 
me that picture hook off the table", looked up to see a 
tall, lank form gesticulating from the perilous heights of 
a step-ladder. Grace's eye ran around the room — a room 
that was one confused mass. In the middle of the floor 
stood a huge trunk, laboring under its burdens of waists 
and dresses. Half in, half out, the tills showed a blur 
of red and white. On the table and bed lay pictures and 
picture-wire, under which were a few somber books; on 
the one chair lay a black beaver, almost smothered by 
sheets of music. The dresser, piled high with ribbons, 
collars, combs and mirrors, looked hopelessly impossible 
of righting. A dusty, half stifling mist filled the air, and 
Grace backed towards the door. 

"I — I guess I've got into the wrong place", she said 
to a plump little girl in a blue lawn dress, emerging 
from the folds of white and blue about the trunk. 

"Oh, no, you've not". The girl in blue extended a 
soft, white hand. "I guess you're Grace Ells, and I'm 
your room-mate, Elsie Roth. Come on in, and we'll order 
your trunk sent up, so's we can get straight". 

Grace looked helplessly at the cluttered room; and a 
skeptical smile spread over her face as she sought a place 
to lay her sailor. B. H. 



Page Twelve 




The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 



WITHIN THE COLLEGE WHIRLWIND 

Almost before the college doors have had time to close 
behind her, the college freshman, no matter how timid or 
lonely she may be, is caught into a whirlwind of enthusi- 
asm and work. Even though she may attempt to keep her 
stand and to view her prospects from a distance, she is 
borne along by the resistless throng surrounding her. To 
classes, to chapel, to this place, to that place, she goes, 
trying to accustom herself to the strangeness of the new 
life. But gradually she becomes a part of the busy con- 
fusion which bewildered her so at first; she has fallen into 
the regular routine. Instead of a multitude of faces and 
beings, there are groups of girls, friends, with names. In 
the course of time she learns to connect the right name 
with the right person. The smiles of pity and curiosity 
have become smiles of personal interest. She is given 
books, lessons are assigned, the doors of knowledge are 
opened just a little crack at a time by an instructor who 
gradually discloses the glimpses of the great unknown — 
some too great to be appreciated or understood fully; 
glimpses that stir new purposes of life, which make her 
want to keep on in search for the new; usually a sort of 
indefinite something, that she herself does not even fully 
comprehend. She only feels that she prefers the simple, 
definite past to the vastness of the future. She doubts 
the ability of her own littleness to grasp and hold the big- 
ness of the new meanings awakened within her. Then, 
sometimes, she'd like to stop to get a breath, but she 
has found that she must keep on and on, for now noth- 
ing waits for her. But she joins with the rest in looking 
forward to the Christmas vacation as a stopping place, 
where she can, for two short weeks, drop from the whirl- 
wind, and have time to understand what are her real 
impressions of her first semester of college life. 

A. P.. '14. 

Page TMrteen 




The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeti7igs 



ON THE BEACH 

A big salt wave rolled in, foaming and hissing, casting 
salt spray over the unwary stroller who had ventured out 
too far in the damp, spongy sand. The sun beat down 
upon the long yellow strips of beach, which seemed to re- 
flect the straight rays in zigzag lines of heat. The endless 
blue of the ocean stretched in every direction, flecked here 
and there by the silver glint of the white cap. Another 
wave rolled noiselessly in, then piled up and toppled over 
with a crash, entirely bowling over a small, unsophisticated 
man, who was very evidently taking his first dip in the 
salt, and had been blissfully unconscious of any wave until 
it had swept his feet from under him. A tall, well built 
girl, with a twinkle in her eye, extended her firm palm 
with a "Can I help you? Please hurry! There's another 
coming" ! Spluttering and choking out his thanks, he was 
on his feet again, this time retreating beyond the reach of 
the waves. A little boy, with a do-or-die expression on 
his small sunburned face, struck the water with such 
vicious blows that he sent the salt spray flying in every di- 
rection, and resembled, more than anything else, a small 
but very animated tadpole. Just beyond the reach of the 
most daring wave, high and dry on the beach, sat a very 
neat, a very stylish bather under a gay parasol. Her suit, 
which stood out stiflBy ij its black taffeta folds; the small 
black sandals, laced with red ribbon; the chic red silk cap, 
with perky bow, all testified to the fact that as yet they 
had been unchristened by the waves. A little way out 
from shore a young girl, with cap askew and hair stringing 
in damp wisps around her cheeks, was trying to learn the 
difiicult art of keeping feet down and head up. Splashing 
vigorously, even desperately, she could keep up for a few 
minutes; then down would go her head with a hopeless 
splash, and she would emerge a few seconds later, splutter- 
ing and gasping, shaking the drops from her drenched hair. 
An unwary sandpiper approached with queer scooting mo- 
Page Fourteen 





The College Greeting's 



tions, paused for an instant to cock one inquiring eye in 
the direction of the noisy bathers, then scuttled away to a 
more secluded neighborhood. M, H., '12. 



A JULY PARADE 

Mercilessly, pitilessly, the sun poured forth its burning 
rays to fall on the surging throng below — a throng hot, 
dusty, tired; but a throng eager and intense, pushing, 
crowding, jostling, each individual determined to see the 
vision of red that rounded the distant corner; to hear the 
sweet strains that floated from the smoking monster follow- 
ing close behind. Shrieks and shouts rose shrilly as they 
came nearer. Youngsters danced and jeered, mothers 
pulled and tugged; but no one could control the swarm of 
little figures that waited tense and breathless. Now they 
stood in awed silence as a band of painted, feathered squaws 
filed by in sullen quiet; now they whispered nervously, 
excitedly, as grim cages rolled slowly past, the smothered 
animals twisting, turning, stamping; and now they yelled 
hilariously, for a blur of red and white and blue danced 
before their eyes — the clowns were grimacing and bowing. 
On and on the procession moved; away out of sight. And 
slowly, reluctantly the throng melted away; sorrowfully 
the tiny faces disappeared. The best part of circus day was 
over. B. H. 



^^s® 



BILLY'S SUNDAY AFTERNOON 

It was Sunday afternoon. This fact was forcibly im- 
pressed upon Billy as his mother smoothed the last lock of 
his stubby, straw-colored hair into place, gave a final tweak 
to his favorite red tie, and sent him out to spend his after- 
noon on the front porch. On other days, he capered out 
like a young colt, too full of life and motion to walk se- 

Page Fifteen 




The C o 1 1 e §■ e Greetings 



^^ 



dately, but today was different. The whole atmosphere of 
the usually noisy neighborhood was changed. As Billy 
let the screen close with a sharp slam, an index to his feel- 
ings, and stamped sullenly out onto the shady porch, he 
felt the difference. Scowling thoughtfully, he sat down 
on the top step. Out of the corner of his eye he could see 
the white, stiffly starched figure of his girl playmate out- 
lined against the cool, dark background of the vines across 
the street; but he gave no sign that he saw her little white 
handkerchief flutter in greeting. Pshaw! what did a girl 
care that she had to be dressed up and sit still so as to keep 
clean? With deepest scorn he reflected that she probably 
liked it; girls usually did. With an air of dark reflection 
he studied intently the tip of his small, white shod foot. 
Why did they dress him up in white? He despised it. It 
was all right for girls, but he w^as no sissy. At the mere 
thought, his small figure straightened indignantly. His 
lips pursed for a whistle, but it was so still that the whistle 
faded away into a sigh. An old hen, clucking busily, wan- 
dered around the side of the house. Before Billy had 
thought, he was half way down the steps. Wouldn't he 
make her scatter? But the sight of his immaculate white 
shoes stopped him short. With an impatient shrug, he 
cast a regretful look at the old hen peacefully scratching 
her way through his mother's choicest flower bed, and then 
he sank moodily down into his old place on the top step. 
Bobby White, Billy's small chum, flashed proudly by on 
his wheel, cap set jauntily on his tumbled shock of hair. 
Very much worn black shoes and stockings encased his legs, 
which flew back and forth with the rapidity and precision 
of small piston rods. Bitterness and hot anger possessed 
Billy's soul, as he saw the figure across the street smile and 
wave in recognition. The cat-call directed toward him 
elicited not the faintest recognition. With a fine show of 
indifference, Billy was watching an approaching automo- 
bile, which flashed like a red streak swiftly around the cor- 



Page Sixteen 





The College Greetings 



corner and out of sight. With his short tail wagging 
vigorously, Billy's pet terrier dashed into the yard and up 
to the porch, beside himself with delight at sight of his 
small master. To his surprise, his frantic capering and 
even his sharp, inquiring barks aroused not the slightest 
hint of interest. Billy's brown eyes merely darkened at 
the sight of his excited pet, and, as he commanded sternly, 
"Down, Gyp"! Gyp settled down, a comically resigned ex- 
pression on his spotted face, for, in doggish fashion, he, too, 
now realized that it was Sunday afternoon. M. H., '12. 



THE FLIGHT OF WILD GEESE 

One quiet autumn evening, as I sat idly dreaming on the 
front porch, I was aroused by a peculiar, melancholy song 
and the soft flapping of wings above me. Looking up, I 
saw a flock of wild geese, swiftly flying southward. Always 
following the leaders, the V-shaped line swept past, easily 
dipping or rising, and swaying in perfect rythm. Their 
graceful heads were stretched forward and their feet held 
taut behind. Quickly they passed, till soon the unbroken 
line was only a grey blur in the distance and the mournful 
song but an echo. I/. I., '14. 



A BARGAIN SALE 

Several times, lately, I had heard mother express a wish 
for a big jardiniere, one to hold her overgrown fern. She 
had tried, I had heard her say, every shop in town, but of 
no use. The jardinieres were all about half the size she 
wanted. When I saw, in the evening paper, that the 
"Forty-Nine Cent Store" would have, the next morning, a 
sale of jardinieres, of large and small and medium jardi- 

Page Seventeen 



tiieres, I decided that I would try my hand on the purchase* 
There I could certainly get one large enough. 

The paper said 9 o'clock, but there was no hurry, for 
I thought not many people would be hunting jardinieres so 
early in the summer. Getting down town about ten min- 
utes after 9, I went to the "Forty-Nine Cent Store", where I 
asked the floor-walker where the jardinieres were sold. 
He grinned and pointed to one side. 

"There, lady, what's left of 'em". 

I looked, but all I could see was a mass of hats and 
women, pushing, crowding and shoving towards the coun- 
ter. Now and then a figure triumphantly emerged from 
the crowd with a big bundle under her arm — exactly the 
jardiniere that I wanted, I knew. At that, I plunged into 
the crowd with one, and one only, intent, to get a jardiniere. 
Everybody must have been trying either to elbow their way 
in or out of that crowd. I was shoved and pushed. Peo- 
ple stepped on my feet. My hat was knocked over my 
eyes, and I was becoming angry, as was every one else, 
when — I suddenly found myself at the counter. 

"Only three small ones left, madam", I heard a voice 
from behind the counter. "Have you any choice"? 

"Any choice — three small what"? I echoed, too over- 
come by the recent struggle to remember anything. Then, 
suddenly coming to myself, I remembered I wanted a big 
jardiniere. I looked up, but even the three small ones 
were gone. The crowd was breaking up, and I, too dis- 
gusted for words, turned and stalked out of the store. 

H. H. 

AT THE BALL GAME 

Now that I had actually persuaded my brother to take 
me to a big base ball game, I found I wasn't nearly so in- 
terested in the game as I was in the people — the great 
crowds of people all about me. At first, they were but a 
confused mass of animated hats and faces. I saw nothing 
Page Eighteen 




The C o 1 1 e sr e Greetings 



in relief, nothing but swarming humanity. As I continued 
to gaze, an individual, then another, stood out from the 
crowd. I watched, fascinated for the moment. Then an 
awful shout in my ears from some enthusiast just behind 
me brought me down to watching my immediate neighbors. 
Just beside me a big, ruddy faced man was trying his best 
to watch the game and at the same time answer "Mary's" 
questions, whoever "Mary" might be. I was just begin- 
ning to pity the poor man when he suddenly arose and 
shouted something about the umpire. My interest was 
aroused. I was evidently missing something. Gently I 
pulled at my brother's coat, as he stood up and shouted 
with everybody else, but he took no notice of me. 

Again I pulled. "Jack! Jack! has anything happened 
to the umpire"? But all I received was a scowl and a 
"Can't you use your eyes"? H. H. 



IN A BALCONY 

As a drama, "In a Balcony" has an unusual structure. 
Concerned with the crucial moment of three people, it 
begins in what would be the climax of the ordinary drama. 
There are no preliminary steps. No subtle preparations 
for a startling denoument. On the contrary, the same 
characteristics that govern Browning's monologues govern 
this dramatic bit. The opening words strike straight at 
the heart of the matter; there is no turning aside to create 
atmosphere or setting, no by-play to vivify characterization. 
Yet these qualities are as discernible as in any of his mon- 
ologue. It is intensely dramatic; it is never cheaply melo- 
dramatic, yet nothing is apparently kept back. 

The story is simple enough, but the theme is big; it is 
even tense. The story depends entirely on the character 
of Constance. The bigness of the Queen, the frankness of 
Norbert would give no excuse for a drama, but the du- 
plicity, the temporizing of a Constance gives the momentum 
that starts and quickens the whole poem. 

Page Nineteen 



The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 



The character of Constance is, perhaps, the least attract- 
ive of the three. At the same time it is the most interest- 
ing, for it grows on the reader as he studies it. Norbert is 
ever the same true, sincere, sensitive lover. The Queen is 
as plainly what she is at the last as at the first. Her love 
was capable of a bigness such a nature as a Constance 
might never know, but all this we can quickly learn. Con- 
stance, however, is not so easily catalogued and shelved. 
She is more complex, far more egnimatical. From the 
very first words we see her ability to reason logically, even 
plausibly. Her plea for Norbert's brilliant future sounds 
true enough, sincere enough. As words go, they are ex- 
cellent, practical, convincing; and yet they do not ring 
true. In the light of subsequent events, they reval her as 
a temporizer, incapable of appreciating the true frankness 
of so open a nature as Norbert's, so generous a one as the 
Queen's. Her very self-sufiiciency proves her downfall. 
Had she doubted her ability to command the situation of 
which she had made herself mistress a little more, had she 
seen her love in its larger relationship, she might have 
saved them all from needless sorrow. So it is, she domi- 
nates the whole action, although she speaks less in the 
more crucial parts than the others. Where the situation 
might demand much from her, she says the least. She is 
surprising all the way through. Where she would be ex- 
pected to be most frank, she is least frank; where she might 
have cleared up the situation, she is quiet. The Queen 
does not know the whole; Norbert does not know the whole; 
Constance thinks she does. As far as the actual circum- 
stances are concerned she does, but not the real depths to 
which her duplicity has led them. She put herself, thought- 
lessly, into a difficult situation, out of which she was not 
capable of extricating herself. She did not see the de- 
mands crowding about her. She lacked keen perception. 
The result was thus bitter disillusionment of a kind and 
good Queen, the needless suffering of a man capable of 
great attainments. Kven this could not entirely rouse the 
Page Twenty 



T Ji c C o 1 1 e g' e Greetings 




latent goodness within her. We are justified in wondering 
of how much bigness of nature, how much abnegation of 
self she was capable, for her realization of her shoitcoraing 
was late, and even then there was in it a reserve and cer- 
tain aloofness which her dignity did not demand. B3/ this 
inability to see her mistake in its proper light, she might 
well be judged as incapable of attaining the selflessness of 
a truly big nature. She was not self-sacrificing; she was 
not far-sighted. She gave herself up to the impulse of a 
moment's rashness. The situation grew too big for her, 
and disaster for all concerned was the inevitable re- 
sult. J. P. 



THE FROG POND 

The last glow of sunset had faded away in the west. The 
big, yellow moon looked over the sloping roof of the shad- 
owy barn down on the frog pond in a far corner of the 
pasture. There was not a ripple, not a sound. The green 
moss made a smooth carpet on the water. The army of 
rushes stood stiffly at the edge. The long water grasses 
twined their damp stems around the stumps and trailed in 
long lines across the pool. The night breeze began to stir 
the rushes and the green water ebbed gently on the muddy 
bank. The moon, climbing higher, looked down on a 
lonely frog sitting on a stump in the middle of the pond. 
Then a gutteral "kerchunk" broke the stillness. An an- 
swering croak came from among the rushes. Green heads, 
with bulging eyes, peered from thewater. There was a 
great splashing, while each frog tried to get possession of a 
stump. Old frogs boomed; young frogs croaked, and tad- 
poles sang. The nocturnal chorus had begun. 

F. R., '14. 

HER DEVOTEES 

"Boys, what does this mean"? broke in the voice of Miss 

Page Twenty-one 




The C o I I e g- e G r e c t i n g- s 



Aron. The combatauts stopped instantly and backed away, 
looking at each other sheepishly. 

"Boys, what have you been quarreling about"? she de- 
manded. There was no reply. 

"O, I am so sorry this has happened, when you boys 
know that fighting is forbidden on the school grounds". 

The boys stood silently, eyes down, digging their toes in 
the ground. 

Just then the recess bell rang. Miss Aron started, then 
turned to say, "You must make some explanation for this 
by 4 this afternoon". 

The boys marched into the school-room and took their 
seats. Fred spent the rest of the afternoon in working ar- 
ithmetic problems. He got not only the lesson in advance 
but a page extra. Harry, between furtive glances at Miss 
Aro-i, sharpened his numerous pencils. 

Before school was dismissed. Miss Aron asked Harry and 
Fred to remain after school. The boys waited. For twenty 
long minutes they sat there. This was very different from 
other nigbts after school. Miss Aron used to let them stay 
to dust erasers. Then they would walk home with her, 
carrying her books; oftentimes she played ball with them. 
They greatly admired her athletic ability. 

Finally the silence was broken, when Miss Aron asked, 
"Well, boys, what have you to say for your conduct this 
morning"? There was a persistent silence. Harry played 
with his ink well. Fred sat with his eyes glued to the 
seat in front of him. 

Miss Aron watched them with a; troubled expression on 
her face. She waited a while longer, then relented a little. 
"Boys, you may be excused to think it over tonight, but 
tomorrow you must tell me". 

The boys hurried out and away, resolving not to tell her. 
For two days they were kept in at recess and after school, 
but still they made no explanation. On Friday night they 
remained after the rest had gone. Miss Aron straightened 
up her desk, then looked at them in questioning silence. 
Page Twenty-two 



■,,r.-- The C o 1 1 e JO- e Greetinsrs 

g^ ^ ^^ 

Feeling no response in their attitude, she left the room to 
start across the hall to the superintendent's office. Fred 
handed Harry a scribbled note. Harry hurriedly scanned 
the paper, then nodded "yes". They jumped up quickly, 
paused at the teacher's desk an instant and were gone. 

In a few minutes. Miss Aron came slowly into the room, 
though she had not gone to the superintendent's office. 
She could not report them; they had meant no harm, she 
knew; yet, why would they not tell her the cause of the 
'quarrel? She could not imagine why these boys, who had 
always been the best of chums, should fight; why they 
should so stubboruiy resist her. As she thoughtfully sat 
down in her desk chair, wondering what next to try, some- 
thing made her look up, to discover that the objects of her 
trouble were gone. Doubts slowly filled her mind. She 
forgot that she was a disciplinarian. She felt hurt, con- 
cluding that she might as well drop the matter for the 
present. She started to lock her desk, when her eyes fell 
on her own name, scribbled diagonally across a rough scrap 
of paper. Something about the unformed letters made her 
wonder as she unfolded the paper. The contents were 
brief. Quickly she read: 
''Dear Miss Aron 

We was fighting over you. Fred. 

Harry". 

A strange, wondering smile played on her face as she 
lifted her strap of boooks and took her coat from the nail. 

E. M. 



A WESTERN PLAIN 

Our train, slowly but surely, was slowing up. We had 
been going at a terrific rate of speed, for the Fast Mail was 
late, and the engineer had been doing his utmost to make 
up time. The engine puffed pantingly, wheezed, and the 
clickety-clack of the wheels gradually lessened until, with 

Page Tw'enty-th.ree 





The C o 1 1 e ff" e GreetiuQ-s 



a shriek of protest, the long train stood motionless on the 
side track. In surprise, we looked aimlessly out of the 
window for a possible small station, but none was visible; 
only the monotonous level of the lonesome western plains. 

It was a breathlessly hot day. With feelings of relief, 
we filed out to cool off and view the landscape. Desola- 
tion, perfect in its silent awfulness, reigned. Only an oc- 
casional exclamation from one of the passengers broke the 
breathless s tillness. As far as we could see, the barren, 
yellow plain stretched until it seemed to mingle with the 
brilliant hue of the horizon. The dull yellow of the sand 
was dotted with dull, grayish-green clumps of dusty sage- 
brush. Here and there a cactus stood stiffiy alert, its 
prickles menacing anj- unwary adventurer. The sun beat 
mercilessly down upon the yellow sand, which seemed to 
take a fiendish pleasure in reflecting the sharp rays. The 
waves of heat seemed to roll up to us like the hot breath 
from a furnace as we stood in the only spot of shade which 
could be seen, that of the train. No motion; no color; not 
even a breeze to relieve the tensity of our feeling of lone- 
someness. All at once a b:>]d prairie dog appeared, peek- 
ing questiouingly at us from his point of vantage — a stunt- 
ed cactus. Startled by a word from a passenger, he scuttled 
away, and was soon lost to view in the safe seclusion of his 
hole. 

Suddenly the stillness was broken by the shriek of an ap- 
proaching locomotive, which swooped down upon us like a 
great eagle — the only moving object in this glaring waste 
of sand. With a roar and a clatter, it rushed past us. 
"All aboard"! sounded from a rear coach, and we turned 
with relief to the car, which a short time before had seemed 
unbearable. The sun seemed to turn its glaring eye from 
us back to the defenseless sagebrush, seemingly bent upon 
one aim — to burn the stunted leaves as yellow as the sand 
which lay motionless and glaring on all sides. M. H. 



Page Twenty-four 



The most dainty thing's in Rings and Jewelry. New 

and handsome styles of goods in Sterling- Siver. 

Hig-hest g-rades of Cut Glass, and every :description 

of Spectacles and Kye Glasses 

Fine Diamonds a Speciality 

at 

RUSSELIv & LYON'S 

West Side Square 
Both Phones 96 



The Travei.br. "Are these all the sandwiches you've 
got to eat?" ^ 

Waiter. "I 'avent got to eat any of 'em. I've got to 
try to sell 'em.''~Londo?i Sketch. 



e:. a. schoe:dsack 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 E. State St. Jacksonville, 111. 

Illinois Telephone 388 



Ivadies' High Grade, I^ate Style 

FUR SCARFS and MUFFS 

are sold by 

Frank Byrns 

Most Reasonable Prices 



The stocks at this store em- 
brace styles in dress goods 
and dainty accessories that 
appeal immediately to the 
tastes of college girls. 




HOCKENHULL BlDC. JaCKSONVIUeJiI.. 



"A DEIvIGHTFUL RIDK" 
This will always be the cry 
if the rig came from 

CHERRY'S 

Horses are fine travelers but 
gentle and safe. 

All equipage the finest 
Call either phone 

CHERRY'S LIVERY 



Dr. Albyn Lincoln Adams 

Oculist and Aurist to 

School for the Blind 

323 W. State St. 

Practice limited to diseases of 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 


Dr. R. R. BUCKTHORPE 

Dentist 

( 111. House 1054. 
Phones ■< Bell. Office 512. 
1 111. Office 750. 

Over Hatch Drug Store 

Jacksonville, 111. 


"Why did you break your engag-ement with that school 
teacher?" 

"If I failed to show up at her house every evening-, she 
expected me to bring a written excuse signed by my 
mother." — Ne%v York Evening- Mail. 


DENNIS SCIIRAM 

Jeweler 

College Pins, Spoons, Etc. 

South Side Square 
JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 


DR. CARIv E. BLACK 

Office— 349 E. State St. 
Telephone, either line, No. 85. 

Residence — 1305 West State Street 

Telephone, either line. No. 285 
Surgery— Passavant Memorial Hospit- 
al and Our Savior's Hospital 
Hospital Hours— 9 a. m. to 12 m. 
Office Hours — 1:30 to 4 p. m. Even- 
ings and Sundays by appointment 


BARGAIN BOOK STORE 

West State Street 


\Wmm HAIR DRE88ER 

I am prepared to manufacture hair 
combings in the latest style. Sham- 
pooing and scalp massage done by ap- 
pointment at your residence. 

FLORENCE KIRK KING 

503 W. College St. 111. Phone 837 




Andre & Andre 

HOUSE) FURNISHINGS OF QUALITY 

When you think of Furnisliingr, for 

the Home or Office 

THINK OF US 

48-50 North Side Square 



Tourist. "What a long- tunnel this is!" 
Brakeman. "This ani't no tunnel, we're g"oing- 
throug-h Pittsburg-." — Life 

"Thinks he's in the same class with Abraham Lincoln, 
does he?" 

"Yes, and confidently expects a promotion." 

— Harpers'' Bazaar 



The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital . , . $200,000 

Surplus . . , 20,000 

Deposits . . . 1,100,000 

U. S. Depository for Postal Savings Bank 

Julius E. Strawn, President 
Miller Weir, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T, B. Orear, H.J. Rog- 
ers, A- A. Curry,^. B. Graff 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



We make a specialty of catering- to I. W. C. students 
We also make nice Birthday Cakes with dates and ini- 
itials and delicious new Sundaes which colleg-e girls 
appreciate so much. 
Phone us your wants and we will deliver same to colleg-e 
Let us furnish you an estimate on your next class recep- 
tion or social function of any kind. 
We have both phones. No. 227 

VICKERY «& ME^RRIGAN 
Caterers 527 West State St. 



E. W. BASSETT 

ocdl-.l-e<3e: uewel-frx 

Copper and Brass Goods, Desk Clocks, Desk Sets, Chaf- 
ing* Dishes, Percolators, Alcohol Stoves, Kettles. 

COLLEGE AND SOCIETY STATIONERY 

SPECIAL SOCIETY ENGRAVING 

DONE TO ORDER 

Kodak Supplies Amateur Finishing 

21 South Side Square 



"Had a puncture, my friend"? 

The chauffeur looked up and swallowed his fellings. 
"No sir, he replied. I'm just chaug"ing- the air in the 
tires. The other lots worn out, you know." 

— Idea 



A BARGAIN 
IN STATIONERY 

78 Sheets of Linen Paper 
and 50 Envelopes to match 

all for 25c 

Armstrongs Drug Store 

The Quality Store 
Southicest Corner Square 



A. L. BROMLEY 
TAILOR 

315 W. State St. 111. Phone 1G9 

Suits, Coats and Skirts 

made to order by expert tailors 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dying 

and alterations of all kinds 

Special rates to students 

Work called for and delivered promptly. 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 
Fancy Bazaar and Millinery 

211 West state Street 



I DO 

Kodak Finishing 
Bromide enlarging 
Flashlights 
a«d View^s 

CLAUDE B. VAIL 

Oswald's Drug Store, 71 E. Side Square 

Residence Phone, 111. 1493 



montgome:ry & dkppe's 

KVERYTHING IN DrY GoODS— WF^LIv LIGHTED 

FIRST FIvOOR CLOAK AND vSUlT ROOM 

Agents for Ladies Home Journal Patterns 

The new "Howd" front laced corsets 


"It would be laughable if it were not so serious," said 
the pessimist. 

"It would be serious if it were not so laughable," said 
the optimist. — Buffalo Express 

"Why do you call your place a bungalow?" 

"Because the job is a puugle and I owe for it." — Judge 


SNKRLY & TAYLOR 
Select Groceries 

221 West State Street 


Cloaks. Suits, f2im^^P^"-^"^'iL^ 

^^^^UACKSONVILLE , ft.L. 

Established 1890 

Low Prices, Square Dealing 
Keep us busy 


GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 


Illinois Phone 57 Bell Phone 92 

Fresh Drugs, Fancy Goods, 

Stationery 

THE 
BADGER DRUG STORE 

2 doors West of Postoffice 
235 E. State Street. 



GEO. T. DOUGLAS 

FANCY GROCERIES 

234 West State St. 738 E. North St. 



Dr. Victor Kutchen told about a collie dog- which he 
boug"lit from a German family, in the course of a lecture 
before the Social Economics Club. "The dog was like 
some college students I have heard tell of," said the Doc- 
tor. "He could understand German perfectly, but he could 
not speak it." 



Joseph Heinl & Sons 



FLORISTS 


Jacksonville, 111. Both Phones 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 




SHOES 


DR. KOPPERL 


We invite you to come to onr 
store and look over a line 


Dentist 


of shoes that are right 


326 W. state St. 


W. T. REAUGH 




Fashionable Footwear 




South Side Sq. 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING 

for the latest in Suits, Ladies' Underwear, Ribbons, 

Laces, Embroidery Materials or Notions 

Visit the store that carries the 

up to date merchandise 

PHELPS & OSBORNE 



"I envy that woman who is sinp-ino-" 
"Why I don't think much of her voice." 
"Oh it is'nt her voice I envy, its her nerve" 

— Toledo Blade 
"Is your son still pursuing- his studies, Mrs. Brown." 
"Yes but it seems to be a stern chase, he is always 



CHAS. M. HOPPER 
Dentist 



2ii S. Side Square 



COOK 

LIGHT with GAS 

HEAT 

Jacksonville Railway & 
Light Company 

224 South Main Street 



Brady Brothers 

Hardware, Cutlery 
Paints 



L. C. & R. E. HENRY 

Fine Mii^linery 
jacksonvilive, illinois 

23 South Side Square 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe Say 

We can furnish your 

Shoes and Party Slippers 

in the popular styles 

leathers, and 

fabrics 


J. P. BROWN 

Sheet Music and Musical 
Merchandise 

Talking Machines and Supplies 

Mail Orders Solicited 

S. W. Cor. Square 


Guide. (Before statue) "This piece of work you are 
now looking- at, g-oes back to Praxiteles. 

Visitor. "What's the matter, ain't it satisfactory?" 

— Boston Transcript 

"What're you comin' home with your pail empty for, de- 
manded the farmer, did'nt the old cow g"ive anything?" 

"Yes," replied the boy; "nine quarts and one kick." 


JOHN K. LONG 

Job Printing- 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 

Loose Leaf Note Books 

Illinois Phone 400 

no North West St. 


Hillerby's 

is the safest place to buy 
RIBBONS, HOSIERY, 

GLOVE)S 
and HANDKERCHIEFS 

W. Side Square Both Phones 


Mm Mil 

ALL KINDS OF FRESH and 

SALT MEATS, FISH, 

POULTRY, ETC. 

Both Phones 196 230 W. State St. 


Ask your grocer for 

HOLSUM 

BREAD 

Made clean. Delivered clean 
in waxed paper wrappers 



SKIRT BOXES 

ROCKERS, SCREENS, DESKS 

AND BED ROOM CURTAINS 

AT 

JOHNSON, HACKETT & GUTHRIE'S 



Small Boy. "I want some medicine to reduce flesh." 
Clerk. Anti-fat? 
Boy. No, Uncle. 

History Teacher. "What was the Sherman Act?" 
Bright Pupil,. "Marching- through Geog-ia." 

— Everybody s 



F. E. Farrell E. E. Crabtree 

Established 1865 

F. G. PARRELL & CO. 

BANKERS 

Successors to First National Bank 

Jacksonville, 111. 



C. S. MARTIN 

Fine Pictures — Artistic Framing 
Frames and Ovals of all 

descriptions and sizes 

314 W. State St., Scott Block 

Jacksonville, 111. 




Il^fv? 






Frank EUiott, Pres. Wm.R.Routt, V-Pres, 
C. A. Johnson, Cashier 

J. Allerton Palmer, Asst. Cashier 
J. Weir EUiott, Asst. Cashier 



ELLIOTT STATE BANK 

Jacksonville, 111, 
Capital $100,000 

Undivided Profits % 56,000 

DIRECTORS 
Frank EUiott Frank R. EUiott 

J. Weir EUiott John A. BeUatti 

Wm. R. Routt C. A. Johnson 

Wm. S. EUiott 



IPboto {portraiture 
oxTO ©f=»ie:t-h 

Successor to 
The Watson Studio 

Southwest Corner Square 



"I was gfoing- to g^ive Jinks a little friendly advice this 
morning"" 

"And did'nt you?" 

No, he started to tell me how to run my affairs, and 
that's something" I tolerate from no man. 

— Washing-ton Herald 



We always have 

The Latest Novelties 
for Young- Women 

We have made our success by 

anticipating" 

Correct Styles for each season 

EVENING SivlPPERS 

JAMES McGINNIS & CO. 

62 EBSt Side Square 



Piepenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 

HERE TO PLEASE 

Candies, Cakes, Cookies, Pies 

Sandwiches, Pop on Ice, 

Groceries, 

California Fruits, 

School Supplies 



HARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO. 

Designs, Cut Flowers 
Plants 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

Store: Pell Phone 154, 111. 182 

Greehouses, Bell 775 



GIRLS: Come and visit me 
at my little Hat Shop. I 
g"ive especial attention and 
prices to college g"irls. 

DORA P. ROBINSON 

537 South Diamond Street 



Ube (Tollege (Breetings 

l|The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 
€|Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month 

<jf Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies 15c. 
<j]Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 



Contents 

Editorial 3 

The Freshman's Sorrow, the Sophomors's Joy ... 5 

All in One Day 8 

A Kitchen in Harvest Time 9 

Study Hour 10 

Just Before 11 

My First Attempt at Wage Earning 13 

The Themes of "The Lotos Eaters" and "Ulysses" . . 14 

Catching the Pioneer Limited 17 

Department Notes ... .... 18 

Society Notes 20 

Y. W. C. A 21 

Alumnae Notes' 21 

Locals .... 23 

Class Officers . ..... . . 24 



OTf)at bigionarp tints tfie pear 
puts on, 

laifjen falling leabes falter tljrousfi 
motionlegs air 

0v numblp tling anb gljiber 
to be gone! 

^loto sfjimmer tfje loto flats 
anb pastures bare, 

^S toitb iftv neftar ^ebe 
Autumn fills 

Wfit botol bettoeen me anb tbose 
bistant bills 

^nh smiles anb sbafee abroab i)tv 
mistp tremulous i)aiv. 

— Lowell 




Zhc College (3reetinge 

Vol. XV. Jacksonville, III., November, 1911 No. 2 

Facul,ty Committee — Miss Weaver, Miss Tanner, Miss Cowgill 
Editor — Janette C. Powell 

Associate Editoks— Louise Gates, Helen Moore, P)dith Lyles 
Business Manageks — Annette Rearick, Myrtle Walker, Marian 
IvOmbard. 



As I.W. C. increases in enrollment and in equipment, it i- 
ouly fitting that her Founders should be given due recogs 
nition. With each succeeding j^ear, credit is being given 
where blame or indifference was formerly felt. There is a 
growing realization of the debt we owe to the men who 
were strong enough in courage and in faith not only to 
hope but to do, — men who with all material odds against 
them, heroically persisted in making their "visions" 
realities. Founders they were not only of college halls but 
of college loyalty as well. 

Without minimizing the work of the early Founders, 
should we not also turn attention to present day builders? 
In the light of the accomplishments of the past, there may 
seem little to be done. lyook about you, however, and 
pressing needs will be seen on every side. [In these days 
of prosperity there are as big problems to be met and solved 
as there were sixty years ago. True, the life of the institu- 
tion is not threatened; yet the school is not entirely secure, 
for again and again comes the plea for greater endowment. 
Builders there must be in the present who will assume their 
responsibility as did the Founders of 1846. 

Long have the officials felt that such responsibility must 
be met. What of the student body? After all, it is they 
who are really the pulse of the whole; their attitude it is 
that determines the measure of success the college may 
hope to reach. On them ^ the the present problems of en- 
Page Three 




The C o 1 1 e sr c G r e e t i n o- s 



dowment, of a greater library and increased facilities are 
dependent. To them do the promoters turn for inspiration 
and encouragement. There are many ways of assisting; by 
giving individually where it is possible; by interesting 
others in the movement that they will see the wisdom of 
contributing; by striving constantly for higher scholarship, 
and by being ready to lend a helping hand to any project, 
no matter how difficult or far away its accomplishment. Is 
the loyalty of each student strong enough to stand the 
strain of so great a trust? The present is offering many 
opportunities for every student to take a stand. With the 
Founders of 1846 may the Builders of 191 1 be united by a 
common bond, the making of a greater I. W. C. 



To the Greetings staff complaints from the Alumnae come 
very frequently. Many an envelope brings such messages 
as: "No attention is given our happenings", "no effort is 
made to keep in communication with us", "nothing is told 
about the people in whom we are most interested". These 
are stock complaints that come to us year after year. No 
doubt there is truth back of them, but complaints can be 
remedied only in part by adding more. Divide the time 
spent making these complaintsDin giving us the means of 
supplying these very acceptable items. The staff, too, feels 
that the Alumnae should be better represented in the 
"Greetings", but as yet no solution of the problem of se- 
curing items has been found. 

The present students have heard it said somewhat fre- 
quently that the Greetings is decidedly a college paper, de- 
pendent on no one class, on no one person, but on all con- 
nected with the college. Each alumna is as truly a part of 
the college as any present student. Her assistance is as 
vital now as in the years when Latin and'g,"Math" were 
her chief concerns in life. The college needs the students 
of the past as much as students of the present. From each 
comes inspiration and increased loyalty. As the years go 

Page Four 




The C o I I e §■ e Greetings 



by class loyalty may wane; college loyalty never. Because 
of this relationship the doings of the Aluranag are of great 
interest to "Greetings" readers. At any time we shall 
gladly receive items of interest, and what is more necessary, 
ways of communicating that will assure us of a sustained 
interest. At best, few items come to the notice of the 
general secretary; if each Alumna, however, would consider 
herself a specially appointed reporter of Alumnse notes, the 
problem would, in large part, be solved. Instead of a de- 
cided concern in matters that apply only to one's immediate 
interests, either those of present or past students, we should 
find in the college paper an effective means of strengthening 
the tie that holds together all daughters of I. W. C. 



WW 

THE FRESHMAN'S SORROW, THE 
SOPHOMORE'S JOY 

The entrance of the Freshman into her big experience of 
college life is stamped indelibly upon her memory. Her 
spirits, so confident and assured v;hen she left home, have 
gradually sunk until, as she fronts the sea of unknown 
faces at the station, a terrible feeling of strangeness sweeps 
over her, paralyzing confidence and assurance alike. lyittle 
more than her nod of assent is needed by the brisk, 
energetic girl, who rushes to meet her as she descends the 
train steps with the businesslike question, "I suppose you 
are going to the College?". Her bag is seized by willing 
hands, and before she can realize what has happened, she 
is being piloted swiftly up the walk to a large building, 
which is literally overflowing with girls. Her busy guide 
does not allow her to tarry on the broad porches, a flower 
garden of colors and hues, attractive with the bright 
gowned girls, who gaze at her with friendly curiosity. Old 
girls are impulsively pounced upon by members of the 
porch circle, but she is ushered hastily into the reception 
hall. The confusion of the porch melts into the greater 

Page Five 





The C o 1 1 e g" e G r e e t i n g- s 

chaos of the hall. Girls are darting hither and yon, laden 
with suitcases, boxes and umbrellas. The little Freshman 
notices, with a jealous pang, that the "old" girls of her 
group show no hesitation, but after a word of greeting to the 
gracious directors of all the tumult, they sail triumphantly 
up the steps to their rooms, while she spends hours of 
dreary waiting in a big, gloomy parlor. The room to 
which at last she is piloted resembles in no way her ideal 
of a college room. Chaos reigns here, as elsewhere. She 
notes with dismay the one small closet and the immense, 
almost colossal, proportions of the trunks, evidently her 
roommate's, already deposited before the door. But the 
registration agony! What did she ever imagine could be 
like that? A volley of questions bombard her at the outset; 
she is catechized and questioned. Notebooks are demand- 
ed with an air of authority, which she has forgotten ever 
existed. Questions about authors, textbooks and hours 
confuse her still further; apparently„there is no limit as to 
what she is supposed to know or remember. Hopelessly, 
helplessly she flounders through it all and then vainly 
endeavors to straighten out that Chinese puzzle, the 
schedule. Before she recovers her breath from this ordeal, 
there is a deafening clang and she is hustled down the 
broad steps into the dining room — a maelstrom of flitting 
girlish figures. She finds herself at last at a place, still 
desperately^clinging to the small white card which she has 
been told is worth its weight in gold and is, under no cir- 
dumstances, to be lost. The conversation, carried on with 
characteristic abandon of girls long separated and then 
reunited, leaves her untouched. Enviously she listens to 
the prattle of these wonderful beings, so sure of themselves, 
while she grows more and more aware that she is indeed a 
'stranger in a strange land'. An obstinate, hard lump 
rises in her throat, which she chokes back with difiiculty. | 
The hours afterward, spent writing for that elusive trunk, 
do not add to her happiness. Its late arrival leaves her in 

Pa-a^e Six 




The C o 1 1 e §• e Greetings 




a state of despair. The horrible jangle which heralded 
their rush to the dining room the night before brings her 
next morning into the middle of the room with vague feel- 
ing that there must be a fire somewhere. And so she be- 
gins the busy day, flying from one class room to the next 
through confusing mazes of halls, whose intricacies she 
despairs of ever fathoming. Trunks are §to be unpacked, 
curtains made, classes met and bills paid. She is swept 
on by the resistless tide of duties. Days pass; her initiation 
into the whirl of activities is complete. At last she has 
found her place. 

A year later the same Freshman bounds up the front 
walk — the same walk, the same porch with its gay crowd 
of girls, but what a different girl. Some mysterious change 
has been wrought. With a rush and gush of exclamations 
she is in the midst of a gayly gowned group, embracing, 
kissing and chattering in rapid succession. Escorted by a 
noisily happy group she makes a triumphal entry into the 
confusion of the reception hall. The same gracious 
director of the same old tumult of last year is no longer a 
stranger to be dreaded. Her suitcase is dropped with a 
thump, greetings follow thick and fast. Her throat aches* 
her hat is askew at a rakish angle, but her eyes shine with 
the joy known only to an 'old' girl. Schedules are arrang- 
ed in a trice, classification this year is a joy. Then, with 
a dash she is in the midst of a noisy bunch in the front hall 
and her voice is soon added to the happy hum. The gong 
brings a prompt response; a merry rush ensues, each girl 
bent on securing a place at her favorite teacher's table. 
The hours afterward are spent in visiting; unpacking is not 
to be thought of on this first wonderful night. The deafen- 
ing clang of the rising bell leaves her unalarmed this year, 
her deep sleep is not broken until she feels a hand on her 
shoulder and a voice in her ear saying: "It's ten minutes 
of seven". With practiced haste she is dressed; and the 
rush of routine begins. Condescendingly she guides new 



Pac« Stfren 



The C o I I e sr e Greetins^s 




girls to and from class rooms, cofidently sure of herself and 
unruffled by all her old Freshman worries. The Freshman 
has entered into Sophmore land. M. H. '12. 

ALL IN ONE DAY 

"This schedule of mine was never intended for anyone 
less than the owner of a pair ot seven league boots and the 
wisdom of Solomon. I'm considering whether a school for 
the feeble minded or an insane asylum would be best for 
me. ^"hy? Because I have done enough stupid things 
today to warrant my residence in either place. 
• To begin with, I wanted this morning to make good use 
of my one vacant period, so I trotted down to the public 
library at eight fifteen. No, of course it wasn't open; and 
I had to come right back, for I had a class at nine. It was 
History, too! You can imagine my state of mind anyway, 
but when I found I had read the wrong article for a report, 
I was ready to send in my application for a room out on 
South Main. This conviction was only strengthened 
when, after I had recited on the Mormons to the full extent 

of my knowledge, Miss calmly said, "continue". 

In chapel I got a little cooled off, only to get reheated by 
falling down stairs in trying to get to I^atin on time. When 
I did get there, I remembered that it was our day off and 
instead of Latin I had two hours practice over in the north- 
east corner of Music Hall. By luncheon time, all the dust 
of the key-board was evenly spread over my hands. It is 
convenient sometimes to live in a South room in Harker 
Hall but that time was an exception. Then lunch. I 
wanted chicken coquetts and we had sardines. 

That reminds me, I must dress for dinner. Wear this? 
My dear! have you looked at the left side of my skirt? I 
spilled a pint, more or less, of nitric acid in chemistry this 
afternoon. Doesn't it look awful? But think, I had to take 
a music lesson immediately afterward. The very sight of my 

Page EiglLt 



The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting 



hands, so stained and dirty, made me blunder like a be- 
ginner. That was bad, but what followed was worse. I 
was just coming home when I met the office girl. She in- 
formed me that I had callers who could stay only a few 
minutes! I gave my hair some wild pats and my shirt- 
waist such a desperate yank that I tore it all along the in- 
sertion. Well, I went down and there sat Mother's most 
aristocratic Boston friends! Poise, self control, sens2, 
everything left me and I know they were shocked at the 
way I looked and acted, for really after all my trials I was 
fussed to death. And tonight, although lyatin, harmony, 
and Knglisli aren't touched for tomorrow, I'm going to 
write to mother. F. S. '15. 



A KITCHEN IN HARVEST TIME 

The granaries had been cleared; horses and wagons had 
been put in working order, and the evening before the slow, 
ponderous machine with its crew had puffed laboriously 
along the field road to the barn. Everything had been put 
in readiness for the harvest. Long before the sun gilded 
the bristling lightening-rods on the house, wood-smoke was 
pouring from the kitchen chimney. Within, the energetic 
housewife was working briskly, for there was much to be 
done on this day. As she rolled out her biscuits, she 
glanced with satisfaction at the pantry shelves with their 
array of golden-brown loaves, neatly covered with paper, 
their jars of crisp doughnuts and rows of pies — all the fruit 
of her yesterday's toil. That, at least, was one thing off 
her hands, she thought. She hoped there would be 
enough doughnuts. Every year she made a greater 
quantity than before, but each year saw the demand for 
more. 

Breakfast over and the dishes washed, a lively campaign 
was begun. Under the brisk fingers of the neighbors, who 
had come in to help, pails of potatoes were pared, peas and 

Page Nine 



The College Greeting's 

beans brought in from the garden and placed over the hot 
fire in great iron kettles. Soon there was a great sputter- 
ing and frying, as the housewife, with flushed cheeks, now 
rolled a wing in the flour, now added a thigh, fried to a 
delicious brown, to the heaping platter. The fragrant 
aroma of coffee from the great granite boiler reached the 
harvesters coming in from the machine. Outside there 
was great competition for the w^ash-basin and mirror; inside, 
a confusion of orders and a great hurrying to have the meal 
in readiness. At length, the last plate of bread and the 
last platter of chicken was crowded on the long table that 
stretched the length of the low dining-room. To the call, 
"Dinner ready" the men filed in like school boys at the 
recess bell. F. R. 



STUDY HOUR 

The two girls, room-mates, strolled arm-in-arm down the 
corridor. The study-bell had not rung; there was plenty 
of time; and girl-like, they were not unduly anxious to 
begin study. As they reached their door, however, its 
tyrannical peal sounded over their heads, driving them, 
reluctant, to their tasks. Marie donned a kiraona and seat- 
ing herself on one side of the table, reached for her college 
algebra. Bettj^ slowly disrobed, stopping now and then to 
yawn elaborately. Slipping on her kimona, she walked 
over to the dresser and stood there for fully five minutes, 
alternately bufiing her finger-nails and scanning her com- 
plexion critically in the glass. Having apparently satisfied 
herself, she drew her chair up to the table and sat there 
gazing into space. Marie turned a page and began to cal- 
culate a problem in logarithms. Betty, aroused by the 
rustle of paper, opened her history with a sinking heart at 
the first glimpse of a terrifyingly long list of dates. She 
studied diligently for five minutes. 

"Mercy, but its hot in here", she thought and leaning 
out the of window, she looked at the moon and wished she 
were at home. 
Page Ten I 





The C o 1 1 e g" c G r e e i i n g- s 

After awhile, visions of her unlearned history lesson arose 
before her. Slowly she withdrew her head from the win- 
dow and went back to her book. On the way, an open 
magazine on the bed caught her eye. She remembei'ed 
there was a story left unread; a story of almost breathless 
interest. It wouldn't take a minute to finish it, she 
thought. Before she reached the end, however, the hour- 
bell rang. She caught her breath sharply and looked over 
at her room mate. Beside her were sheets of paper covered 
with numberless figures, heaped up on the table. 

"Wh3^ how on earth did you get so much studying 
done?" Betty cried. "I haven't accomplished a thing." 

F. R. 

JUST BEFORE 

Outside the door of the stage, I stood listening to a 
railtary'march,'* conscious that as soon as the pianist touch- 
ed the final chord, I was doomed to make my appearance. 
I tried to review my declamation but no line came in the 
proper place. Shuddering, I found myself saying over and 
over the introductory paragraph. I thought, groped mad- 
ly but vainly for what succeeded. Here a line and there a 
line flashed through my brain, giving me such a feeling of 
suffocation that I decided the best thing to do was calml}^ 
to delight in the music. For me, there v^-as no more of 
calm than delight. The march made m}'- heart rise and 
fall. The heavy chords' seemed to drive it up and down. 
Every tone, instead of giving quiet and encouragement, 
bewildered and frightened me. Suddenh^ with one tumul- 
tuous outbreak, the music ceased ; and before I could realize 
it, I heard my name called. The battle was on. 

B.J. A. '13. 



THE "GOOD OLD TIMES" 

The whitehaired grandmother, happy in the delusion 
that the time of her girlhood was indeed the golden age, de- 
Page EJleTen 




The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 



lights in filling the ears of her up-to-date young grand- 
daughter with marvelous tales of the long ago. With a 
self complacent, happy smile and a dreamy look in her 
faded blue eyes, sherecalled the wonderful spelling schools, 
the old home place with its mammoth fireplace in the cor- 
ner, where the family gathered cozily erery evening around 
the blazing logs. Those lines of sputtering apples and 
hissing chestnuts she compared with pride with the sticky 
masses, the rubbery concoctions of her granddaughter's 
chafing dish. Those family dinners, when the noisy mob 
came trooping joyously back from a reunion at the old 
home place. What one of the happy, carefree tribe cared 
if the silver wouldn't go round or that the smallest child 
had to be propped up in a position of doubtful security on 
the old family Bible. The granddaughter's enthusiastic 
accounts of theatre parties, college spreads, concerts and 
grand operas aroused little show of interest in the eyes for- 
ever directed upon the halycon past. Unpleasant features 
have all been forgotten, it is only happy memories that 
throng through the dear old mind. Retrospect, pleasure- 
able and happy, has made her forget that, while the fire- 
places were delightful and exceedingly picturesque, they 
warmed but a little circle around the fender. In the un- 
comfortable chill of the "outer darkness" but a part of 
one's shivering form could be warm. While one's face 
roasted, chilly creeps chased up and down one's back. 
The fact that spelling schools, 'while entertaining for the 
tot of the grades, are not the most profitable of pastimes for 
the student, the girl cannot expect her grandmother to 
appreciate. She has listened with patience to the detailed 
account of the modest, retiring lass of the past, in contrast 
with the boisterous, slangy, mannish girl of today. Her 
stir of protest at the wholesale classification of girls does 
not disturb the tale of the accomplishments of her grand- 
mother's friends, who were all >ersed in the intricate art 
of spinning, all model housekeepers and faultless cooks. 



'Ps>.%« Twelve 





T Ji e C o I I e g" e G r e e t i n g" s 



She realizes, as she thinks of her "today", that these 
model housewives of the past had probably never made 
the acquaintance of the redoubtable Caesar, and his mar- 
velous bridge so familiar to every present day girl. Prob- 
ably they had never fathomed the depth of Browning, or 
thrilled at the fire and passion of Byron's fervor. Could 
the numberless tasks requiring so fully their whole atten- 
tion compensate them for the loss of college life, alluring 
in its pleasures and broadening in its wider, far-reaching 
influences? Her convincing queries, however made but 
little impression for, as she glances at her, she realizes that 
the dim eyes are turned back again toward the past, b}'^ 
the softly murmured words: "After all, the good old times 
were best. M. H. '12. 



MY FIRST ATTEMPT AT WAGE-EARNING 

Daddy always took all the children in our neighborhood 
— and there were plenty beside my four other brothers and 
myself — to see the circuses. For weeks after one of these 
treats, Vv'hen we had been to see Buffalo Bill's Wild West 
Show, our back yard was a popular Indian Camp under a 
varying rule of chiefs who claimed this position by the 
amount of war paint and feathers they could bedeck them- 
selves in. Our faithful old pony played the part of a wild 
bucking broncho, with delicate hints as to when his 
specialty of bucking was in demand, The pantry proved 
the most frequented place on a raid for supplies, and a 
generally depleted larder gave testimony that the "heap-big 
Indians" were a hearty species. In our favorite sport of 
lassoing, the pump was nearly dragged from the well in 
frantic rushes past it. Soon these inanimate objects proved 
too tame for the boys, and a secret conclave was held when 
all the pennies in the neighborhood were turned into the 
common treasury; and with the wealth of the camp, it was 
voted to hire Dave and me, the youngest of the tribe, in 
which, by the way, I was the only girl. 

Page Thirteen 



The C o 1 1 e p- e G r e e t i n sr s 



By special messenger we were escorted before the tribunal, 
whera the spokesman of the crowd asked: "Say, do you 
kids want to earn a lot of money?" 

"Yes, siree, and you can get some all-day suckers and 
some licorice and — O, just lots of things," added another 
iu this unparliamentary assembly. 

To earn the twelve pennies that the treasury boasted, 
Dave and I were to run back and forth across the yard un- 
til dinner time — over an hour away — while the boys tried 
their hand at lassoing us. We took up the bargain and 
managed to dodge the eight ropes that were being hurled 
from all sides until whiz! came a rope and with a shout of 
triumph the leader rolled Dave over and over in the dust. 
After our first fall, we seemed lost, for we'd no more than 
get free from one rope, and scramble to our feet than we 
were down again. But even after successive tumbles, the 
twelve pennies and their possibilities seemed too wonderful 
to let us think of stopping. When the prize was finally 
ours and we had the pennies in our hands or even as long 
as lasted the candy that we had bought with our wealth, we 
did not mind the rope-burns. The last piece of candy gone, 
however, no amount of persuasion could induce us two 
cross, stiff youngsters, our wrists and ankles swollen from 
frequent contact with the ropes, to be lassoed again. With 
the candy had vanished our recent ambition to live in the 
wild and woolly west, where Indians were real and awful 
and where ponies bucked without special inducement. 

Iv. G. '12. 



THE THEMES OF ''THE LOTOS-EATERS" 
AND "ULYSSES" 

"The I^otos Eaters" and "Ulysses" have but one bond 
in common, the same character. The circumstances, how- 
ever, in which he appears, could not be more widely separ- 
ated. In one he is utterly weary of every responsibility; 
Page rourteen 




The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting 



rest is the one thing desired; realities fade away, dreams 
alone are pleasing. In the other, he is entirely concerned 
with the problems of men; he must act. In the "Lotos 
Eaters" he is all that is not heroic; in "Ulysses" he pos- 
sesses the qualities of a true hero. In the former, he is 
but one among a band of weary wanderers; in the latter, 
he is the dominant figure who, standing alone, boldly faces 
his problems. 

In "The I/Otos Katers" the setting is an important factor. 
Such ''mild- eyed, melancholy" beings as the L,otos Eaters 
must be given a proper background or the force of their 
condition will not rouse interest. More than a deft touch 
here and there is needed to quicken the whole into life. 
Woes have been endured by the sea-tossed sailors, until 
hope of ever being rescued has almost left them. Their 
leader, however, showing a little more hope, tries to urge 
them to still greater effort. At last they reach a land un- 
like anything they have ever seen in all their eventful 
journey. Everywhere there is the langor of a summer 
afternoon; everywhere the sense of completion. No sign 
of growth, no sign of progress, no sign of exuberant life. 
The moon has attained its full size. Slender waterfalls do 
not seethe and pulsate with boundless energy, but curl 
lazily downward as smoke, then pause awhile before com- 
pleting their uneventful descent. The mountains are 
covered with aged snow. Over everything there is a hush, 
a cessation, a colorless sameness. 

From out this background, slowly, aimlessly, entirely 
devoid of curiosity, came the I^otos Eaters. To the travel- 
lers they offer the one gift of their land, the enchanted 
lotos. A taste and all life is changed. Inertia encom- 
passes them. All thought of home, of toil, of further jour- 
neying is a far off shadow. Mere dreams of Fatherland 
now satisfy. To rest, to dream is all life demands, until 
they too sink into the lethargy of "mild-eyed, melancholy 
L,otos Eaters. ' ' - 

Page Fifteen 




The C o 1 1 e 9- e G r e e t i n &" s 



\ 



A far different note is struck in the opening words of 
"Ulysses." Here there is no need of an elaborate back- 
ground. A deft bit of landscape, a telling suggestion of 
color s all that is necessary to give reality to so stirring a 
scene. Ulysses' spirit dominates the whole, his boundless 
energy, his mature daring, his sane view of life need no 
embellishment. He embodies the spirit of progress in his 
every thought. Because he is limited by his Greek idea 
that "Death ends all," he deserves the more praise for his 
indomitable spirit of striving. If he had had a vision of 
the splendid continuity of I^ife possessed by a Rabbi, Ben 
Ezra, he would have had an incentive to enlarge his ex- 
perience. That he should dauntlessly push forward in 
spite of so limiting a belief shows how large was Ulysses' 
conception of service. Pleasure and pain are alike to him 
in that they offer opportunity for growth and for discipline. 
With splendid perspective he sees himself as a part of all 
I/ife. That part he neither over estimates nor under esti- 
mates. His achievements do not blind him to others' 
activities. He sees clearly the relation of the part to one 
great unbroken whole. His is an active work, to do is his 
watch-word; his son's work is less strenuous yet he has no 
thought of belittling the task of Telemachus. 

"He works his work, I mine." 

He realizes he can never reach his goal, for with each 
attainment the goal recedes; 

"All experience is an arch wherethro' 
Gleams that untravelled world, whose margin 

fades 
Forever and forever, when I move." 

This is, he knows, as it should be; this is the great law of 
Progress that lures and calls to the man who .strives with 
his whole heart and soul. Material age is no true limitation. 
Grant as he must that age lessens activity, it cannot kill 
the love of achieving; the soul cannot rest. Worlds are 
still to be sought. Ulysses, therefore, in the evening of 



Page SlxtOMi 



The C o 1 1 e §■ e Greetings 




his life, goes forth, 

"strong in will 
To strive, to seek, to find and not to yield," 
Thus the two poems differ. One is concerned with sel- 
fish indulgence, an indulgence that may charm, that may 
lure, but is not healthy, it will not indefinitely satisfy. It 
resolves itself into the world old cry that finds expression 
in just such an experience as the soul who built herself a 
"lordly pleasure house" in the "Palace of Art". Mankind 
must live with man, serving, learning, assisting. 
"Ulysses" throbs with a service that quickens life for the 
doer, and through him, for the world. Such service knows 
no limiting human thought but projects itself beyond the 
"utmost bound". What matter where Ulysses lands? 
Whether "the gulfs wash him down" or he touches the 
Happy Isles, it matters not to Ulysses; not what he ac- 
complishes, but the fact that he has striven is what actually 
counts. Fail he may in his last undertaking, but such 
would be failure without a sting, for it is failure only in so 
far as his reach has "exceeded his grasp." J. P. 



CATCHING THE PIONEER LIMITED 

A hot summer night in August, I was standing on the 
platform at the station in a small Wisconsin town. Far 
down the street I could see a solitary light shining in the 
window of the village hotel. Across in the other direction, 
stretched a rolling country, dark in the midst of night. 
Above were the stars shining in the cloudless, moonless 
sky. Down the track the green switch lights blinked the 
message of a clear track. Just above me the yellow light 
of the semaphone showed that all was in readiness for the 
expected train to enter the next block. From the inside 
of the station came the sound of telegraph instruments. 
Suddenly the station master came out of his office, locked 
the door, and walked down to the baggage room. Opening 

Pa«« SoT«ntee& 




7^ h e C o I I e o- e G r e e t i n s" s 



the door he pulled out a truck loaded with trunks and bags, 
and looked up the dark track. Then far off in the dark- 
ness I heard a whistle. 

' ' Fifteen minutes late. Murphy's making time tonight, 
growled the agent. 

Then there appeared the reflection of the electric head- 
light against the sky. I could hear a faint roar, which 
gradually grew louder. Another whistle gave the signal 
of the approaching train, and the head-light flashed into 
view around the curve. With a breath of hot air the train 
came plunging on. Suddenly with a screech of clinging 
brakes and sparks flying from the brake shoes, the train 
came to a stop. 

"All aboard", shouted the conductor. "You'll have lo 
hurry, sir; we're late." 

"Day coaches in the rear," sharply came from the 
brakeman. 

Grasping my bag, I hurried after him. In the mail car 
I caiight a hurried glimpse of the busy mail clerk, hastily 
assorting mail. The baggage man was energetically load- 
ing the trunks. The long line of puUmans suggested the 
reverse of all this activity and wakefulness. As I reached 
the dimly lighted day coach, the train began to move. I 
clutched the handrail, swinging myself aboard, the brake- 
man after me. With a screech and whistle, we were off 
through the night. G. U. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

It is indeed gratifying to note the decided increase in the 
College of Music enrollment of girls from the College home, 
an increase of almost thirty per cent over last year's enroll- 
ment being recorded. The practice rooms are filled almost 
to the limit every day, and it looks much as if more pianos 
will soon be needed. 

The first of the regular weekly students' recitals planned 
for the year took place on Thursday, October 19th, a spleu- 



The C o I I e g" e G r e e t i n g" s 



did program being given. Professor Donald W. Swarthout, 
in commemoration of the looth anniversary of the birth of 
Franz lyiszt, (Oct. 22nd, 1911), gave an interesting talk on 
the great musician's life, closing with a description of a 
visit to the Liszt home at Weimar, Germany, which Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. Swarthout made last spring. 

The Music Department is happy to announce the acquisi- 
tion of a large library of Ensemble Music purchased recent- 
ly by the College with the idea of building up this very 
important side of musical study. The library comprises 
thus far arrangements for four and eight hands at two 
pianos of most of the best known symphonies, overtures, 
etc., as well as a number of selections for two. three, and 
even four violins with piano. The classes in Ensemble 
will be handled by Director and Professor Swarthout and 
are certain to prove a most valuable as well as popular ad- 
dition to the music course already prescribed. 

The classes in the Art Department are large and 
enthusiastic. 

Several of the art students made posters for the 
Y. M. C. A. circus which was held the last of October. 

Mildred Brown, '11, is attending the Chicago Art In- 
stitute. 

Zillah Ranson, who several years ago took a scholarship 
in the Art Students' I^eague of N. Y. on work done in our 
studio, is doing craft work in the studio. 

Miss Knopf spent six weeks in Ogunquit, Maine, paint- 
ing in the summer school of Chas. H. Woodbury, 

Winnie Sparks, '10, is teaching Art in the public schools 
of lyincoln. 111., for her second year. 

A very successful sandwich sale was given shortly after 
school opened by the girls of the Expression Department. 
The proceeds are to be used for the furnishing of the Ex- 
pression studio. 

PftC* Nia«t*eB 




The C o 1 1 e s" e GreetinsTs 



The second year Home Economics students are making 
uniforms to be worn during their work in the kitchen 
laboratory. Since the costume is to be worn only in the 
laboratory, it will insure more sanitary conditions during 
the preparation of the food. 

On Wednesday afternoon, October nth, the sanitation 
class visited the High School to study the combined heat- 
ing and ventilating system which is installed there. 

SOCIETY NOTES 

Monday evening, October i6th, the Belles I^ettres gave 
their annual theater party in honor of the new girls. A 
most amusing farce, Petticoat Perfidy, was given by May me 
Severn, Jane Bacon and Jeanette Taylor. After the play 
a theater supper was served. The society hall was prettily 
decorated in the society colors, gold and black. 

On the evening of October 14 the Phi Nus entertained 
the Academy students. The hall was decorated with bowls 
of leaves, and twenty little tables were scattered around, 
each representing a fort, and on an arch which crossed 
the tables was found our own red, white and blue emblem. 
At each table a group of four played anagrams and great 
was the excitement when some one advanced to the next 
fort, or had to retreat. And when the players lacked in- 
spiration, over in one corner, one of the girls played the 
piano. Then the tables were cleared and dainty refresh- 
ments were served. After this more songs were sung and 
a very pleasant evening came to an end. 

On Thursday afternoon, October 5, the Phi Nu Society 
entertained the Belles I^etires Society. Hot chocolate and 
sandwiches were served. Miss Weaver and Mrs. Harker 

were the otlie: guests. 

Pa«« Twenty 




The C o 1 1 e §■ e Greetings 



Y. W. C. A. 

The first Saturday evening away from home, which is 
proverbially lonely for the new girl, was entirely the con- 
trary September 23rd at the annual Y. W. party, the 
place where new friends are found, mutual acquaintances 
are discussed, old friendships renewed. The name contest 
seemed to bring the girls together at the first of the even- 
ing, and held them during the other informal games. This 
Y. W. C. A. party, as the first social affair of the year, gave 
an impetus which will be carried through the social events 
of the year. 



ALUMNA NOTES 

The election of Mrs. Susan Brown Dillon, class of '74, 
as an Alumnae trustee, is not only a merited recognition of 
Mrs. Dillon's loyal spirit and generosity toward her Alma 
Mater, but it also brings into the councils of the trustees a 
woman of fine personality and wise judgment. She is the 
daughter of the late Judge Wm. Brown, who was one of the 
founders of the Illinois Woman's College and was the 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees in its early years. 

The many friends of Mrs. Katherine Short Waller of the 
class of '76 have been grieved to know of the death of her 
husband. Dr. J. D. Waller, who was called from life after 
a sudden illness of only a few days duration. Dr. Waller 
was the senior physician in Oak Park, where he and Mrs. 
Waller have made their home since their marriage twenty- 
three years ago, and where Mrs. Waller and her daughters 
will continue to reside. 

The Nebraska Federation of Women's Clubs held its 
sixteenth annual meeting on October 9-10-11-12 in Hol- 
drege and was presided over by its gracious and able presi- 
dent, Mrs. Anna Reavis Gist, who has been an active 

Page Twenty one 





The C o 1 1 e §■ e Greeting's 



leader in the Woman's Club movement for a number of 
years. Mrs. Gist is an alumna of Illinois Woman's College, 
a member of the class of 1884. 

The wedding bells have benn ringing again and again 
for I. W. C. brides during the last few months. 

On September 12th, 'at the home of her parents in 
Virginia, Miss Rena Frances Crum, '08, was married to 
Mr. Harry Sinclair. After an extended automobile trip, 
Mr. and Mrs. Sinclair will make their home in Virginia. 

In July Miss I^ucia Kellogg Orr, class of 1893, became 
the bride of Mr. Robert W. Woolston, the recently appoint- 
ed superintendent of the Illinois State School for the Blind. 

September the third was the wedding day of Pearl lyouise 
Jennings, '10, and Mr. Grover C. Stockman. Mr. and 
Mrs. Stockman are at home in Carbondale, 111. 

Miss Grace B. Gilmore, class of 1898, was married at her 
home in Petersburg to Mr. John Edgar Ullman of Des 
Moines, Iowa, in which city they are making their home. 

On tne i6th day of August Miss Helen Birch, class of 
1904, was married to Mr. Elbert Hugh Filson. Mr. and 
Mrs. Filson are living in Jacksonville. 

Miss Ruby Ryan of the class of 1908, was married to Mr. 
Fred Copper at her home in New Holland, where they will 
continue to reside. 

On June 19th, Miss Georgia Osborne Metcalf, '08, was 
married to Mr. James W. Bristow. Their address is now 
450 South Street, Springfield, Missouri. 

Elsie Fackt, '09, has entered Washington University at 
St. lyouis. 

Margaret Eaton is taking a course at the University of 
Illinois. 

Many will be sorry to hear of the death of Mr. J. C. 
Eisenmayer of Trenton, Illinois. His daughter, Amelia 
Eisenmayer, studied voice at the college six years ago. 



The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting- s 




Edith Morgan, '06, has been studying violin in New 
York City all summer, but expects to go to California next 
month. 

Alta Morgan is teaching Domestic Science in Fullerton, 
California. 

Hilda Hegeuer, '06, is teaching in the Beardstown Pub- 
lic Schools 

Besse Holnback is studying violin under Prof. Lichten- 
stein of St. Louis. Nelle Holnback, '06, and Amelia 
Postel, '06, have just returned from a three months trip 
through the West. 

Christine Remich Siegmund is now living in St. I^ouis. 

Edith Conley, '08, is teaching in Athens College, Ala. 
Nelle Smith teaches there also. 

Mrs. David Logan, '05, (Linnie Dowell) has a little 
daughter, whom she has named Mary Elizabeth. 

LOCALS 

Miss Weaver entertained the Y. W. Cabinet for dinner 
Friday evening, October thirteenth. 

While Dr. Nate has moved to Champaign as pastor of 
First Church there, we are delighted that he will come to 
I. W. C. as before, because of his new office on the Board 
of Visitors. 

Helena"Lewyn's Concert, Thursday evening, October 
twelfth, 'was the first one of three to be^'given^i^in Jackson- 
ville this winter. The second, November sixth, is the 
Olive Mead vString Quartette; the third, the soloist, Luella 
Chilson-Orhman, on December fifth. These concerts have 
been arranged by Mr. William P. Phillips. 

Dr. French, pastor of State Street Presbyterian church 
talked in chapel, October eleventh. 

Page Twenty-three 



f i m\) \ I . vkmm mmmmmmmmmiimmm^BKammmmmmmmKmmm 



» 



The C o I I € §' e Greetings 



Misses Mary Hughes, '06, and Rosalie Sidell, '07, visited 
at I. W. C. during October. 

Mrs. Fa}'^ Clayton Thompson, of Rennsalaer, and 
Frances Scott recently took dinner at the college. 

CLASS OFFICERS 

SENIORS 

President Annette Rearick 

Vice President Ethel Rose 

Secretary and Treasurer May Heflin 

JUNIORS 

President Geraldine Fouchc 

Vice President Emily Jane Allan 

Secretary and Treasurer Elizabeth Tendick 

SOPHOMORES 

President . Eetta Irwin 

Vice President Fern Reid 

Treasurer Fay Burnett 

Secretary Anna Shipley 

FRESHMEN 

President . Freda Sidell 

Vice President Nina Slaten 

Secretary Ruth Young- 
Treasurer Irene Crum 



Page Twenty-four 



E. J. WADDELL & CO. 

Suits, Coats, Costumes, Skirts, Waists, Corsets 

Muslin Underwear, Gloves, Hosiery 

Novelties and Newest Models 

Shown always at moderate prices 



Why is a secret a poor investment? 
If you keep it, you lose your interest; if you tell it you 
lose your principle. 




We Repair Shoes 



THE NEW SHOE STORE 
For Dressy Footwear 

The classy new shoe store is offering a classy 
lot of shoe stj'les. 

We make an extra effort to supph' the wants 
of College trade in their various shoe wants, 
street shoes, dress slippers, lounging slippers. 

HOPPERS 

Southeast Corner Sq. 



Jacksonvilles l&rgcst Mens' Store 

Pennants and Banners 

I. W. C. and Fraternity special designs 

Manish Cut Sweater Coats 

Hand Bags, Trunks 

and Suit Cases 



McCULLOUGH BROS. 

Professional 
Photog-raphers 

HockenhuU Bldjr. 



PACIFIC HOTEL 

H. Poulk J. B. Snell 
Proprietors 

JACKSONVIIXE, IlXINOIS 




' 





IF YOU ARE LOOKING 

for the latest in Suits, Ladies' Underwear, Ribbons, 

Laces, Embroidery Materials or Notions 

Visit the store that carries the 

up to date merchandise 

PHELPS & OSBORNE 



"So you you have had a long seige of nervous prostration? What 
caused it? Overwork?" 

"In a way, yes. I tried to do a novel with a Robert Chambers 
liero and a Mary K. Wilkins heroine. "—Z//^. 



CHAS. M. HOPPER 
De:ntist 

2ii S. Side Square 



COOK 

LIGHT with GAS 

HEAT 

Jacksonville Railway & 
Lig-ht Company 

224 South Maiu Street 



Brady Brothers 

Hardware, Cutlery 
Paints 



Fancy Toilets Christmas Goods 

COOVER & SHREVE'S 
Drug Store 

Kodaks and Supplies 

Developtng and Finishing 



Mathis, Kamm '& Sliibe Say 

We can furnish your 

Shoes and Party Slippers 

in the popular styles 

leathers, and 

fabrics 


J. P. BROWN 

Sheet Music and Musical 
Merchandise 

Talking Machines and Supplies 

Mail Orders Solicited 

S. W. Cor. Square 


ist Deaf and Dumb Man — "Did your wife scold you when you 
got home late last night?" 

2nd Deaf and Dumb Man — "vShe started to but I put the light 
out." — Harper's Weekly. 


JOHN K. LONG 

Job Printing- 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 

Loose Leaf Note Books 
Illinois Phone 400 

no North West St. 


Hillerby's 

Dry Goods Store 

Safest Place 
to Trade 


DIHI MH 

ALL KINDS OF FRESH and 

SALT MEATS, FISH, 

POULTRY, ETC. 

Both Phones 196 230 W. State St. 


Ask your grocer for 

HOLSUM 

BREAD 

Made clean. Delivered clean 
in waxed paper wrappers 



The most dainty thing's in Rings and Jewelr3^ New 

and handsome styles of o-oods in Sterling- Siver. 

Hig-hest grades of Cut Glass, and every ^description 

of Spectacles and Rye Glasses 

Fine Diamonds a Speciality 

at 

R U S S P: Iv L & LYON'S 

West Side Square 
Both Phones 96 



Miss W. (in German class) — "What are the two general kinds of 
verbs?" 

"Hard and soft," came the answer and the girl wondered why 
the class laug:hed. 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 K. vState St. Jacksonville, 111. 
Illinois Telephone 38S 



Ladies' High Grade, Late Style 
FUR SCARFS and MUFFS 



ARE SOLD BY 



Frank Byrns 



Most Reasonable Prices 



College Girls are invited to take 
advantage of the resources of this 
store for supplying their needs in 
the dry goods line. Dress Goods, 
Silks, Ribbons, Laces, Handker- 
chiefs, eis. are to be had here in 
attractive patterns at poplar prices. 




%^fK^\ 



HOCKENHULL BlDC, JACKSONVILLE. lu. 



"A DELIGHTFUL RIDE" 

This will always be the cry 
if the rig- came from 

CHERRY'S 

Horses are fine travelers but 
g'entle and safe. 

All equipag-e the finest 
Call either phone 

CHERRY'S LIVERY 



Dr. Albyn Lincoln Adams 

Oculist and Aiirist to 

School for the Blind 

323 W. vState St. 

Practice limited to diseases of 

E3^e, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 


Dr. R. R. BUCKTHORPE 
Dentist 

( in. House 1054. 
Phones-? Bell, Office 512. 
( IlL.Offlce 750. 

Over Hatch Drug Store 

Jacksonville, 111. 


"Any deep-sea fishing at your summer place?" 
"No; there was girl at the hotel who made several million casts 
for a high C, but she was stranded on the flats every time." 


DENNIS SCHRAM 

Jeweler 

Colleg-e Pins, Spoons, Etc. 

South Side Square 
JACKSONVIIXE, ILIv. 


DR. CARL E. BLACK 

Office— 349 E. State St. 
Telephone, either line, No. 85. 

Residence— 1305 West State Street 

Telephone, either line, No. 2S5 
Surgery— Passavant Memorial Hospit- 
al and Our Savior's Hospital 
Hospital Hours — 9 a. m. to 12 m. 
Office Hours— 1:30 to 4 p. m. Even- 
ings and Sundays by appointment 


BARGAIN BOOK STORE 

West State Street 


EXPERIENCED HAIR DRESSER 

I am prepared to manufacture hair 
combings in the latest style. Sham- 
pooing and scalp massage done by ap- 
pointment at your residence. 

FLORENCE KIRK KING 

503 W. College St. 111. Phone 837 




Andre & Andre 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS OF QUALITY 

When you think of Furnishings for 

the Home or Office 

THINK OF US 

48-50 North Side vSquare 



At the Art Museum the sign "Hauds Off" was conspicuously 
displayed before the statue of the Venus de Milo. A small child 
looked from the child to the statue. "Anybody could see that," 
she said. 



The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital . . . |2oo,ooo 
Surplus . . . 20,000 

Deposits . . . 1,100,000 
U. vS. Depository for Postal Savings Bank 
Julius E. Strawn, President 
Miller Weir, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear, H.J. Rog- 
ers, A- A. Curry, C. B. Graff 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



We make a specialty of catering- to I. W. C. students 
We also make nice Birthday Cakes with dates and ini- 
itials and delicious new Sundaes which colleg-e g-irls 
appreciate so much. 
Phone US' your wants and we will deliver same to colleg-e 
Let us furnish you an estimate on your next class recep- 
tion or social function of any kind. 
We have both phones. No. 227 

VICKE)RY & MBRRIGAN 
Caterers 527 West State St. 



E. W. BASSETT 


ool-L-b:<3e: us=:we:l_f?v 


Copper and Brass Goods, Desk Clocks, Desk Sets, Chaf- 


ing- Dishes, Percolators, Alcohol Stoves, Kettles. 


COLLEGE AND SOCIETY STATIONERY 


SPECIAL SOCIETY ENGRAVING 


DONE TO ORDER 

Kodak vSupplies ■ Amateur Fiuishing 
21 South Side Square 


"Why docs the giraffe have such a long neck?" asked the teacher. 


"Because its head is so far away from its body." 


A BARGAIN 




IN STATIONERY 




78 Sheets of Linen Papier 
and 50 Envelopes to match 


H. J. & L. M. SMITH 


all for ^Sc 


Fancy Bazaar and Millinery 


ArMvSTkongs Drug Store 


211 West vState Street 


The Quality Store 




SoutJnreiit Corner Square 




A. L. BROMLEY 


I DO 


TAILOR 

:nr> \V. stalest. 111. Phono IC!) 
j Suits, Coats and Skirts 


Kodak Finishing" 
Br(nnide enlarging" 
Flashlig-hts 


|)iiade to order by ex[)ert tailors 


and Vie^vs 


Cleanin<;i*, Pressings, Dying" 

and alterations of all kinds 

Special rates to students 


CLAUDE B. VAIL 

Oswald's Drug Store, 71 E. Side Square 


Work callt'd for and delivered promptly. 


Residence Plioue. lU. 1493 



MONTGOMERY & Dli^PPK'S 

Everything in Dry Goods — Well Lighted 
first floor cloak and vsult room 

Agents for Ladies Home Jourual Patterns 
The new "Howd" front laced corsets 



Mr. Edison is being received in Europe like royalt}-, which causes 
the Washington Post to remark that he will probably cut Portugal 
and Russia from his itinerary. 



SNKRLY & TAYLOR 
Select Groceries 

221 West State Street 



GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 






''^ 



V 



f^. 



'"''W'^' (jACKfo.yv.'LL/!: , /ll. 



Established 1890 

Low Prices, Square Dealing 
Keep us bus\' 



Illinois Phone 57 Bell Phoue 92 

Fresh Druj^'s, Fancy Goods, 

Stationer}^ 

THE 
BADGER DRUG STORE 

2 doors West of Postofl&ce 
235 E. State Street. 



GEO. T. DOUGLAS 

FANCY GROCKRIES 

234 West State St. 738 E. Nortli St. 



"Has Jones a good mcmoi}?" 

"No, he forgets to remember, instead of remembering to forget." 



Joseph Heinl & Sons 

FLORISTS 
Jacksonville, 111. Both Phones 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 



DR. KOPPERL 
Dentist 



-,26 W. Slate .SI. 



SHOES 



We invite you to come to onr 

store and look over a line 

of shoes that are rig-ht 

W. T. REAUGH 

Fashionable Footwear 
South Side Sq. 



SKIRT BOXES 
. ROCKERS, SCREENS, DESKS 
AND BED ROOM CURTAINS 

AT 

JOHNSON, HACKETT & GUTHRIE'S 



Small Boy. "I want some medicine to reduce flesh." 
Clerk. Anti-fat? 
Boy. No, Uncle. 

History Teacher. "What was the Sherman Act?" 
Bright Pupil. "Marching throug-h Geogia." 

— Everybody s 



F. E. Farrell E. E. Crabtree 

Established 1865 

F. G. FARRELL & CO. 

bankers 

Successors to First National Bank 
Jacksonville, 111. 



C. S. MARTIN 

Fine Pictures — Artistic Framing 

Frames and Ovals of all 

descriptions and sizes 

314 W. State St., Scott Block 

Jacksonville, 111. 




Frank Elliott, Pres. Wm.R.Routt, V-Pres. 
C. A. Johnson, Cashier 

J. AUerton Palmer, Asst. Cashier 
J. Weir Elliott, Asst. Cashier 

ELLIOTT STATE BANK 

Jacksonville, 111. 
Capital $100,000 

Undivided Profits $ 56,000 

DIRECTORS 
Frank Elliott Frank R. Elliott 

J. Weir Elliott John A. Bellatti 

Wm. R. Routt C. A. Johnson 

Wm. S. Elliott 



pboto portraiture 


' oxxo ©i=iE-rH 


Successor to 


1 The Watson Studio 


.; Southwest Corner Square 


i 


"I was Sfoing- to g-ive Jinks a little friendly advice this 


morning"" 


"And did'nt you?" 


No, he started to tell me how to run mv affairs, and 


that's something" I tolerate from no man. 


— Washing'ton Herald 


We always have 

The Latest Novelties 

for Young" Women 


Piepenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 


We have made our success by 
anticipating" 


HERE TO PLEASE 
Candies, Cakes Cookies, Pies 


Correct Styles for each season 


Sandwiches, Pop on Ice, 


EVENING Sl^IPPBRS 


Groceries, 


jame:s mcginnis & co. 


California Fruits, 


62 EBst Side Square 


School Supplies 


HARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO. 


GIRLS: Come and visit me 


Desig"ns, Cut Flowers 


at my little Hat Shop. I 


Plants 


g"ive especial attention and 


Southwest Corner Square 


prices to college girls. 


Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 


DORA P. ROBINSON 


Store: Pell Phone 154, 111. 182 


537 South Diamond Street 


Greehonses, Bell 775 


1 



Zbc CoUeoe (Breetings 

CjfThe College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 
•IJContributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month 

<|fSubscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies 15c. 
€}IEntered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 




3J toigf) pou a Cfjristmas 

^notop anir tilotop; 

Mitf) bells a=rinsins, 

^nb olb gongg ringing, 
^nb feinb ijanbg clinging; 

^nb olb time toeat^er, 

^nh true frienbg, 
^nh neto frienbg, 

Snb all goob frienbs together 




Vol. XV. Jacksonville, 111., December-January, 191 1 No. 3 



Faculty Committee — Miss Weaver, Miss Tanuer, Mies Cowgill 
Editor — Jauette C. Powell 

Associate Editors— Louise Gates, Helen Moore, Edith Lyles 
BusiNKSs Managers — Annette Rearick, Myrtle Walker, Marian 
Lombard. 



Since both December and January are broken months in 
the college calendar, it seemed wise to follow the plan of 
last year's staff in making the "Christmas Greetings" a 
double number — A Christmas Greetings. 



It is with pleasure that we give first place, at this time, 
to Dr. Marker's gracious response to our request to usher in 
the holidays by a word of 

CHRISTMAS GREETING 

To 

Teachers, Students and all Friends 

of the 

Illinois Woman's College 

Ivong years ago the Christ Child was born in Bethlehem, 

and the Angels sang a New Refrain, and there was a New 

Song of Hope in a Mother's Heart. 

Ever since, wherever the Good News has spread, every 
Hamlet and every Home has been brightened with Great 
Cheer, and every Mother's Heart has been lightened with 
New Hope, and every Child has been born into a New En- 
vironment of Ivove and Promise. 

This Christmas Time of 191 1 may the Christ Child be 
born anew in all your Hearts, and may His I^ife and His 
Spirit be qtiickened again in your L-ives. Thus surely the 
real Christmas Cheer and Ivight and Love will shine from 
its own Central Sun into your lyives, and be reflected into 
the I^ives of All within your Circle. 

Page Three 



The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 




With the Cbri?tmas Spirit in your Hearts you will carry 
the Christmas Cheer into all your Hotoes. 

Christmas, 191 1, will thus be to every one of you 
A Merry, Merry Christmas, 
and the coming 1912 will be 
A Happy, Happy New Year 

W^ 
Christmas is a time of dreams. lyast Christmas a splen- 
did vision found its way into the pages of the Greetings, 
the vision of a greater library. It was, however, more than 
a mere vague desire. Before the year had passed those 
same coveted books had been placed upon shelves no longer 
empt)'-, — shelves filled with orderly, self-respecting rows o^ 
books. Our realization of this vision, however, but opens 
up another possibility. Although there are more books, 
the shelves themselves have multiplied; there are still many 
vacancies that must needs be filled to meet the ever increas- 
ing demand for research work. The success of last year's 
effort marked but the beginning of a greater library. On 
the college Christmas tree the librarj'- should surely be 
given at least one branch weighted down with co-operation 
and euthusiasm. 



OTHER CHRISTMAS-TIDES 

If there is ever a time when "all the the world's akin", 
that time is Christmas, the holiday season of the nations. 
Although joy is the key-note of all these celebrations, each 
nation expresses this joy in its own individual way. Many 
of their customs are their heritage from romantic, chivalric 
ancestors; many have found being in the simpler lives of 
the peasantry. Whatever the origin, however elaborate or 
crude the expression, there is back of them all the same 
motive, the desire to rejoice, to give individual expression 
of an unlimited love for humanity. 

Perhaps the most picturesque customs center about the 

Page ITour 



mrnmmsssismsszvis^mmii'mmimi? 




The College Greetings 



peoples of Northern Europe. With various modifications 
the same ceremonies are attendant in more than one sister 
kingdom. In Germany, the home of the Christmas tree, 
the Christmas season is the day of the child. At this time 
no king is given more attention than the German child. 
Christmas Eve the Christ-child visits the children of the 
land, and with him goes Rupert. If their past record is 
good, a jv)yous frolic is enjoj^ed, and nuts and sweatmeats 
scattered about, but if the record is bad, a grieved silence 
is the result and as Rupert and the Christ-child go quickly 
away, a bundle of rods is left by the door. Few are such 
reports, however, and everywhere is the rush and excite- 
ment of the happy holiday time. In Sweden the holiday 
is observed in a far different though no less picturesque 
manner. The streets present a gay appearance as servants 
disguised as kings, queens, jesters, and soldiers, mingle 
freely with one another as they pass on their way, for by 
thes: picturesque messengers friends send their gifts. 
Huge baskets are filled with all sorts of gifts tied in most 
mystifying packages. These messengers the master of the 
house receives with due deference and respect and serves 
them most bountifully of the Christmas refreshments. 

With many of the legends there is connected a thread of 
superstition. Among the Hessian Peasants there is a be- 
lief current on Christmas Eve that the water of brooks 
changes into wine. To cattle is given the power of speech, 
and bees hum and swarm as if it were mid-summer. Any- 
one standing beneath an apple tree, the tree of life, exactly 
at the stroke of midnight will see the heavens open and 
gain a beautiful vision. Among the cooks of Belgium there 
is a strange superstition that if a boy with a gift is the first 
to enter the kitchen on Christmas morning good fortune 
will visit the house for the coming year. In the present 
time the custom has become so much a part of the Christ- 
mas celebration that boys carrying wafers enter the kitchens 
and say to the cooks, "Merry Christmas". The cook 

Page Five 




The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 



answers, "Merry Christmas to you as well". To this the 
boy replies, "I bring you a wafer, a Christmas gift." In 
return the cook gives him a small coin and adds the wafer 
to a string of similar wafers received at other Christmas 
tides. To Armenian maidens Christmas offers the same 
opportunity that Hallowe'en affords us — to peer into the 
future. On Christmas Eve the maiden makes a corn cake 
and while it is baking she dresses herself in her prettiest 
frock. She then takes the cake to the roof and hiding her- 
self she watches until some bird flies away with the cake. 
Wherever it flies, there she knows is the home of her lover. 
If the bird goes far away out of sight, then she knows that 
she is doomed to maidenhood for another twelve-month. No 
less picturesque is the ceremony observed by the Armenian 
families on Christmas Eve. The father purchases a dozen 
candles about the size of a pencil. These are fastened to 
tlie table. When they are lighted the father talks to the 
family of the Christ-child, dwelling especially on His filial 
obedience. When the last taper has burned the speech 
ends and a feast follows. No gifts are given to members 
of the family, but in remembrance of the gifts brought to 
the Christ the needs of the poor are heeded. 

In France, Christmas is a season rather than a day, and 
the gayer holiday is celebrated at New Year's, About 
the Christmas time there is more of solemnity than is ob- 
served on other French fete days. The great event is the 
midnight mass. In Brittany the country folk carry lanterns 
to this service. When they reach the church, they give 
them into the keeping of poor old women who stand about 
waiting to receive them. After church the lanterns are 
claimed, the old women well paid for their service. After 
mass the family goes to the oldest married child's house. 
Around the great feast board all quarrels are forgotten, all 
v/rongs righted. In all the chapels are to be found the 
creches, more or less elaborate as individual chapels may 
desire. But always there is the crib with the Infant Jesus, 

Page Six 




The C o I I e g" t G r e e t i n g" s 



Joseph and the Virgin. Sometimes short plays are given 
and carols sung in connection with the creches, but of late 
years these ceremonies have been of less and less importance. 

The French peasants, with their superstitions and fears 
of the unseen, imagine Christmas Eve a time of unrest and 
disturbances, a time when evil spirits are loosed, when 
devils leave hell and try to divert the peasants from going 
to mass. Demons torture cattle, and chaos reigns until 
midnight. Then is born the Chritt-child, and all forms of 
evil must needs retreat. Cattle fall in their stalls and wor- 
ship, power of speech is given and they prophesy of coming 
wonders. In Rome at this time there is everywhere dis- 
played pomp and magnificence. Nine days before Christ- 
mas, shepherds come down from the hills to herald Christ's 
birth. Carols are played before the shrines of madonnas. 
Magnificent creches are erected and everywhere is told the 
I^egend of the Creche. In the Chapel of Persepio of the 
Franciscan Order, the monks, in order to do honor to their 
founder, St Francis of Assissi, always erected a very elabo- 
rate creche. The Christ-child was richly clothed and the 
Virgin bedecked with jewels. The Child was supposed to 
have wonderful curative power for all who might touch 
even its garments. The richness of its garments, the beauty 
of its figure, attracted the attention of many. All longed 
for the little figure, and one covetous woman, overcome by 
her greed for the beautiful little figure, feigned illness. 
Since she was an influential woman, her request to have 
the little image brought to her was granted. lyeft alone 
she quickly substituted another figure and kept the original. 
That night the Friars were awakened by a great disturb- 
ance at the church doors. Hastening to the church they 
found the little naked figure of the true Bambino shiver- 
ing in the wind. Since that time the "Bambino" has 
never been left alone but is carefully guarded by some of the 
monks. 

It is to the English Christmas, however, that we turn 

Page Seven 



The C o I I e g- e Greetings 






with the most pleasure, Its dear familiar customs are 
more loved with each repetition. The Christmas greens, 
with their ancient connection with old Druidical rites, the 
cheer of the Yule IvOg, the gay revels of the Lord of 
Misrule, the vows of fellowship made over the Wassil bowl, 
the singing of carols and above all the spontaneous good- 
will toward mankind have stood the test of ages. 

To the United States, England and the other nations 
have given the best of their customs, customs which no 
American would term "borrowed". With ready adapta- 
bility America has made for herself a holiday season as 
joyous and picturesque as the nations who have back of 
them the heritage of the ages. — ^J. P. 

"pirns' 
CHRISTMAS ATMOSPHERE 

Can you tell me what it is 

In the air, in the air? 
Can you tell me what it is 

Everywhere, everj^where? 
Can you tell me why you feel 
'Sif you wanted just to squeal. 
For the very joy of something — 

In the air? 

Can you tell me why your lessons 

Fly along, fly along, 
With an undertone of lightness, 
Like a song, like a song? 
Why are teachers jolly too 
Just the same as me and you 
Over something all pervading 

In the air? 



Why does everybody's face 

Wear a smile, wear a smile? 
Why are all the gloomy folk 

Page Eighit 





The C o 1 1 e g- 1 G r e e t i n g- s 

Out o' sh'le, out o' style? 
Feel as if I'd have to shout — 
Tell me what it's all about, 
What's the something that is surging 

Through the air? 

Mercy, child, it seems to me 

You ought to know, ought to know; 

If you don't it seems to me 

You're pretty slow, you're pretty slow. 

Don't you know vacation's coming, 

And the days are just a-humming. 

With the buzz of preparation 
Everywhere? 

Seems to me it's mostly "home", 
That you hear, that you hear. 

That's the reason smiles abound. 
Never fear, never fear, 

Think of all the Christmas cheer 

That is mighty, mighty near — 

Don't you think that that explains 

What's in the air? — F. H. 

A RIFLED STOCKING 

The Christmas party was in readiness; the last Prep, 
hurried down the hall desperately hoping to catch the group 
she was to join for the carol-singing. Truant thoughts of 
happy groups came to me as, in the whirl of excitement, I 
tried distractedly to center my thoughts on the task before 
me, for I was feverishly trying to catch up with neglected 
work. Scattered notes to be put in a History note-book, 
several days overdue, were collected, and a Catullus refer- 
ence had been worked out when I turned, with a sinking 
heart, to the inevitable theme. During the progress of my 
writing occasional whiffs of hot coffee, waiting the return 

Page Nine 



8aBiBgiffi«gpga s' Ea§an£giiga@B!aaBSCT5 a^ s^ 



The C o I I e g" e Greetings 




of the singers, floated tip to me from the basement. At 
last after spurts of energy and long blank pauses, I careless- 
ly read over my finished theme. A growing feeling of 
wondering curiosity came over me and the last paragraph 
I read through mechanically while in my mind I was sur- 
veying my chance of a peek at the party, the secret of 
which the girls had for weeks been guarding most mys- 
teriously. From the taunts of my room-mate, who took 
delight in arousing my curiosity and from vaguely remem- 
bered bits of conversation overheard in the halls I knew 
the plan for this evening was wholly unique. On the floor 
below me the annual Christmas party awaited the guests, 
so near and yet — not so far, after all, for it would be an 
easy matter to have just a peep into the secret. Perhaps 
I could get a suggestion of the evening's fun from a glimpse 
over the bannister. Cautiously I crept to the stairs, then 
down to the first landing, a clear path so far. How tempt- 
ingly luscious the forbidden fruit seems! A breathless 
sneak through a squeaky door and I had reached my goal. 
No receiving line such as would welcome the real guests 
half an hour later greeted me. My only greeting was the 
nodding of the sprigs of holly clustered over the temporary 
fire-place, where hung the Christmas stocking. How 
strangely human and beckoningly fascinating it looked, 
grotesquely visible in the light of one globe above it! Bulg- 
ing from the stockinged protection, enticingl}'^ piled on the 
mantle and even grouped around the floor, shrouded in 
holly paper was the I. W. C. Christmas. My first glimpse 
at the stocking had driven the faintest interest in mere 
decorations out of my mind; the hidden secrets were an in- 
vitation for me to explore them. A few tiny peeps surely 
wouldn't hurt — I couldn't resist. Straightway my con- 
science vanished, and I gave myself up exuberantly to a 
joy that I had not known since the time I had discovered 
in the farthest corner of the guest-room closet the beautiful, 
curly-headed doll for which I had been begging Santa 

Page Ten 



B^HM I iW*M ||I MW^aBH ! 3ig3m i lMii ! ai^^ 



The College G r e e t i n g- s 



I 



Claus for weeks. As I warily approached the fire-place 
I almost stumbled over a huge draped gift guarding the 
stocking. It was not tied with bright ribbons and bits of 
holly like the rest of the bundles but was concealed by a cover 
carelessly thrown over its bulky proportions. It was easy 
to pull back the cover and so to satisfy my insistent 
curiosity. A timorous glimpse beneath the drapery showed 
a massively built chair. As I boldly examined it I found 
the inscription, "Chair of Sociology". Could it be — that 
long coveted department! The dignity of the chair and 
my boldness in so rudely uncovering it left me awestruck 
and I gently covered it again. As I brushed again over 
huge packages piled around on the floor I pushed over 
a slender gift that stood upright by the chair. I picked it 
up but my punches revealed no hint of what the package 
contained. Its many wrappings and string tied in hard 
knots so discouraged my efforts to undo it that I set it with 
a disgusted thud by the mantle. There I found an un- 
wrapped attraction, a curious box showing a switch- board 
arrangement with a most engaging array of buttons. Be- 
neath the blank spaces, evidently for name and date I 
found the inscription "Permission for Shopping". Won- 
deringly I pushed the accompanying button and with a 
rumble of starting machinery a strangely familiar voice 
said, "Very well, my dear, only remember to report to 
your Gym teacher". Then at my feet there dropped a 
precious card with its three familiar all-powerful initials. 
When I pressed the next button to ask for "Permission for 
Lights," there came the gracious consent with an attendant 
warning as to the results of many late hours. Fascinating 
as proved these experiments with the assistant Dean an 
imminent sense of the necessity for haste drove me to pull 
out a long roll that protruded from the top of the stocking. 
Slipping off the rubber band I found a statement to the 
College Greetings, "We, the undersigned, members of the 
student body, do humbly beg to reconsider our refusal to 

P&S« Sleren 




The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 



subscribe for the Greetings. " I read it again to be sure 
that the list of names attached was real, for with this addi- 
tion the page of student subscriptions would be full. It 
was all there in black and white, truly a real Christmas 
gift to the Greetings. 

With this roll there had fallen out a tiny package. From 
its wrappings I brought forth a queer little devise, so be- 
wilderingly complicated in its mechanism as to need the 
explanatory note. Excitedly glancing through the note I 
found that it lay within the power of the writer to offer a 
temporary relief in the form of a silence to those instructors 
who were trying to teach irregular verbs and history dates 
to the rythm of thumping feet and banging rag-time from 
the crowded Gym. below. The relief need be only tem- 
porary — a fumbling with the pages of the note gave me 
time to wonder why it was to be only temporary — because, 
I discovered next, a Gym was really on its way. 

Visions of this promised Gym with its shower-baths, 
lockers and ideal drill-hall that we had planned for so long 
made me forget for a minute the call of the waiting pack- 
ages. Dreamily I turned to open a business-like yellow 
envelope that contained a bill of lading for two boxes of 
books for the library of I. W. C. As I pushed the mighty 
chair that I had found, close to the mantle so that I might 
perch on one of its arms I pushed back a huge box address- 
ed to the I. W. C. Library Committee. An investigating 
glance around showed many similar boxes — more encour- 
agement for the L^ibrary that surely must come now. 

Another long roll oddly changed the shape of the stock- 
ihg; I pulled it out to find a sheep-skin tied with blue and 
yellow. There in big letters was the degree of B. S. with 
the necessary blanks to be filled out. The date of 1916 and 
the statement that the degree was conferred upon the com- 
pletion of the required four years course in the Home 
Economics Department told of another vision soon to be 
realized. 
Page Twelve 



\ 



The C o 1 1 e sr e G r e e t i n sr s 



Diving into the stocking again I found a small flat box 
and a queer, shapeless package. The seals around the box 
did not make me hesitate for I boldly broke them to find 
carefully enfolded in much cotton a shining medal, "To the 
loyal inspirers of the commendable spirit of the class of 
1914. " Breaking the colored string around the shapeless 
package I found a little dusky elevator boy, a messenger 
to proclaim the coming of a life-sized boy, so skilled in his 
art that he could run the elevator at all hours with a positive 
guarantee against any stoppage or defect in service. 

Twisting the string and crumpled paper around the boy, 
I eagerly grabbed another handful. A queer jumble of 
papers and flying notes scattered over the floor as I dropped 
my next surprise. Grudgingly gathering them up I found 
amazing stories, clever poems, novel suggestions for edi- 
torials — these did not need the labeled card to tell me that 
the Greetings had found another welcome gift. 

Hurrying into the stocking again I found two more 
envelopes and a key whose dangling card read "Key to the 
Greetings' office''. Our Greetings' oflSce! How many 
hopes — a rustling of the window curtain brought back the 
realization of what I was doing in stealth. A cautious 
glance around and I hurried on. In the smaller envelope 
I found a bundle of new suggestions for amazing money- 
making entertainments assuring the Expression Department 
such success that it would soon shine in new furnishings to 
inspire the most backward of orators. In my excitement 
I seemed to forget completely that the secrets of the stock- 
ing were not for me alone for without a thought of stopping 
I tore open the other envelope to find the records of a Senior 
Class of fifty — fifty who had started out together as Fresh- 
men. With the list of real names came a novel class his- 
tory with no record of comrades dropped by the way; no 
Freshman vanquished by Math., no Sopomores lost to 
Matrimony, no Juniors surrendered to teachers' agencies. 
There was no time to praise or wonder at this class as I 

Pa^e Thirteen 



frn i m i f im mr i i ii i i iM iii i ii i ii i i i l i i lyiii i if f iiifiBT i 'ii i 'B i i iTT i ' niif i wwiiMawiiiwiiiiiiiuiwiiiiiiiit i iii i i i i ii mia 




The College Greeting's 



reached for another handful. A bulky package of con- 
siderable weight came out and a hasty glance over the 
directions set me to pushing a side lever that registered at 
regular intervals in blue penciled dashes, "Const.", 
"Punct.", "Sp.", "H". What hours I had spent rewriting 
themes, trying to change my construction, remedy my 
punctuation, spelling and paragraphing and, worst of all, 
to tone the whole topic — and how many hours of like work 
lay ahead of me! Wrapping it again in the paper with the 
blue-penciled decorations that I had added, with an es- 
pecially imposing, "Thought good, but your sentences!" 
looming across the front of the package, I laid aside this 
boon of the theme-corrector. 

Joyfully I turned to put back this ideal Christmas that I 
had so roughly disarranged when a tiny bump in the toe of 
the stocking stopped me. Fishing out this last surprise I 
found, where it had been sadly wrinkled by the weight of 
the mechanical theme-corrector, a very official document 
telling of the gift of a recent alumna of $75 — . Strains of 
a carol on the street below telling of the return of one of 
the groups brought me back with a guilty start to an in- 
creasing sense of peril. Confusedly I wadded the precious 
paper back into the toe and nervously jammed the other 
things, half wrapped, upon it. A sheet of blue print paper 
with many lines and fine lettering stopped me for a minute 
as I turned to go. But the caroling, coming nearer, drove 
me off with a hazy impression of a landscape garden on 
acres of land with many buildings mapped out. Dropping 
the huge sheet, unfolded, across the august Chair of Soci- 
ology, I scooted upstairs. Back in my room a guilty con- 
science began its work, but above it came the distreasing 
thought that I must wait for at least half an hour to find 
how many ciphers trailed after the $75 — in the last won- 
derful gift, for the glimpse I got made any amount seem 
possible. Was the gift for the promised gym., the longed 
for Society Houses, a new L^ibrary, the necessary Dormi- 
Pase Fourteon 



KW I lUi^lllftaMMiiWI i aB I MIiliW^^ 



The C o 1 1 e §• e Greeting's 



tories, perhaps a Senior Cottage, and maybe, best of all, 
even a new pipe organ? Or — the blur of ciphers encour- 
aged the wildest dreams — could the blue print map belong 
with the gift and was I. W. C. to stand serene on a glorious 
campus with buildings for all her needs? — I^. G. '12. 

A VENTURE IN SHOES 

Uncle Will, instead of the usual Christmas gift of border- 
ed handkerchiefs, had sent me money, real shining dollars, 
all my own. Visions of dolls' trousseaux, of candy galore, 
of new games, of skates like cousin 'Bob's', flashed through 
my mind, but my hopes were doomed. The family — what 
decisions one's family can make! — said I had better buy 
something lasting, instead of foolish trifles. Finally, head- 
ed by mother's sense of caution and economy, they decided 
upon shoes — shoes, of all things! Alternately I stormed 
and sulked, but shoes it had to be. The only consideration 
that made my fate bearable was the compromise they grant- 
ed me — for instead of being ignominiously led to the store 
where mother should spend my money, I was allowed to 
go alone. At once the novelty of this appealed to me. 
Finally I started, still a little cross at being made to waste 
my money on shoes, but strangely elated by a feeling of 
dignity and importance. By the time I reached the corner 
I had entirely forgotten my grievance. Firmly implanted 
in my mind were injunctions serious or joking, from all 
the family. On the car going down town I thought of all 
the things I must remember, — not to get them too small, to 
remember that they were to be sensible school shoes, to 
think of comfort rather than slyle; not to pay a great deal; 
to keep in mind what I had started out for. I would show 
them they could have confidence in me and that I, in the 
dignity of my thirteen years, was quite capable of managing 
myself. I proudly walked into a shoe store; but with all 
my confidence, I could not make my order very clear, for 

Paig« Fifteen 





The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 

I found myself facing a confused array deposited before me 
by the clerk. There were kid slippers, black pumps and 
tan pumps, high button shoes with cloth tops, high laced 
shoes, and finally black square-toed oxfords, with low heels 
— sensible to the last degree. I was reluctantly certain 
that these last shoes filled the requirements. Just then, as 
I handled them rather dubiously, the salesman brought out 
an alluring pair of graceful, expensive brown suede pumps 
with dainty pearl buckles and attractive heels. The clerk, 
after the manner of clerks, poured into my believing ears 
assurance that everyone was wearing them; they were just 
the thing this year; in fact, a new st^ck had come this very 
week from New York. Appropriate for everything, he in- 
sisted; very popular with young ladies my age, since low 
shoes were all the rage this winter; and exactly suiting my 
foot. His voluble expressions, his scorn for the plain 
oxfords, and the charm of the slippers themselves were 
making their impression on me. I weakly assented to try 
them on. Then the temptation was too great, and I left 
the store, elated, with the box, which I insisted upon 
carrying, under ray arm. Finall}'- I wished most fervently 
that the shoes were back in the store. How could I face 
the people at home? Quietly I waited for the street car, 
hours in coming, it seemed. Then, although it crawled 
along block after block, with long stops at everj^ corner, 
when it reached our street I was not ready to get off. I 
told myself again and again that it was my Christmas 
money, to get what I wanted; I desperately tried to think 
of the delightful buckles and high heels, but nothing could 
cheer me. With lagging steps I turned the corner. There 
the sight of our house through the bare trees made me utter- 
ly miserable. Not until I had reached the steps did I 
notice my uncle's carriage in front. Then I thought that 
my aunt and uncle's being there at least would put off the 
dreadful moment. I heard a cheerful whistle, and there 
was Cousin Bob sitting on the porch rail. In a flash of 

Page Sixteen 



■ wi WiaaiiwWMimiiaji i tfw»aiMWiMiife«^ 



\l The C o 1 1 e p" e Greeti7ip's i t^ i 

^ If ^^M 

inspiration I knew he could save me. After making him 
promise solemnly never to breathe a word of it, I told him 
breathlessly the whole story, and fervently begged him to 
take the shoes back and get the square toed oxfords. In 
his calm, aggravating way Bob suggested that I take them 
back myself, since I knew exactly what I wanted! I told 
him excitedly that I never could face that clerk again. I 
teased, threatened, begged and bribed, fearful all the time 
that the people inside the house hear me. At last, after I 
promised, at his suggestion, to impress upon his father that 
the only Christmas gift for Bob was a tennis net, he leisure- 
ly stuck the hateful box under his arm, stuffed his hands 
into his pockets, and sauntered carelessly off. With a 
heavy load off my mind I watched him reach the corner, 
turn it, and hurry to catch the car. I skipped gayly into 
the house, resolved that they should never find out about 
the brown slippers. But I reckoned without taking into 
calculation Bob's love of teasing. — M. L. . 14. 



SNOW TIME IN THE FOREST 

Six little fir trees huddled together at the edge of the 
forest broke the deep silence of the soft snow. 

"Christmas must be near," whispered one, slowly waving 
its laden branches to the other. 

"Oh yes, oh yes," came the answer in rythmical chorus, 
"it surely must be; the snow is so deep." 

"Oh, do you suppose we'll be taken this year?" said the 
smallest tree so excitedly that it shook off some of its snow. 
"We've been waiting so long. Now we must be big 
enough. Besides, I heard one of the men that took our 
neighbors last year say that we'd probably do next Christ- 
mas." 

"Well!" sighed a low, thick tree, "I'm sure I much pre- 
fer staying here in the Mother Forest to being cut down for 
some spoiled baby's Christmas tree," 

Page Seventeen 



g Eftm a asH ii B^fcwsiaaaEBawiaggaM^giai^^ 



The C o 1 1 e sr e G r e e t i 7i p- s 



"Oh, I'm anxious to go," said the biggest tree. "I ex- 
pect they'll take me to a fine house, where everything is 
grand; and they'll hang expensive presents on me and deck 
me out with silver and gold; and everybody will say what 
a beautiful tree I am." 

Then the next largest tossed its snowy head, as it said 
defiantly, "It seems to me that such a wealthy home would 
scarcely care for such a vulgarly large tree as you. I know 
my size is a great deal more genteel than yours." 

"Hush!" said the smallest quickly. "So near Christmas 
we mustn't quarrel. I'm sure none of us is too large." 
Then, seeking deftly to turn the talk to less dangerous 
channels, "Where should you like to go?" she asked of a 
slender tree that had not yet spoken. 

The slender tree rustled importantly. '*I think I'll go 
to the window of a big store where everybody will see me 
and remark upon my grace. But my twin, here, who is 
almost as charming as I, is prosaic enough to want to go to 
an ordinary house where just a few people live." 

"Yes, but I don't think that's a bit prosaic," murmured 
the twin in self-defense. "I'll stand in the parlor where I 
can peep into the sitting-room and I'll see the children 
hanging up their stockings by the mantel; and in the morn, 
ing, they'll dance around me, and I'll shower presents on 
them from aunts and uncles and cousins. Maybe they'll 
let me stand until New Year's with my pop-corn and tinsel 
decorations and then they'll light my caudles once more 
and watch the old year out. Even then my glory will not 
be quite over, for the children will each break off one of my 
twigs to keep till next Christmas. This is what I'd like to 
have happen to me." 

For a little while there was silence, save for the soft mur- 
mur of the trees in the low wind. Twilight had deepened 
into night, and the clear stars had come to shine on the 
sparkling snow. Then the smallest tree of all proudly lift- 
ed its head. 

"At Christmas time, I believe I could be happy any- 
where." — ly. I. '14. 

Pa^e Bifliteen 



EBaas B ^aBg ' m^&'iJMfls aa ffli iBB S &itfe ^miaa^^ 




The C o 1 1 e §• L Greetings 



JIMSEY'S CHRISTMAS ANGEL 

The snow was falling, covering the dirty ground with a 
new white blanket, as in preparation for the Christmas tide. 
Upstairs in the room that served as living-room, kitchen 
and dining-room, Jimsey sat alone in the dark. Mother 
had been sent for, to work in the kitchen of one of the large 
houses of the city, where there was being given a party. 
Jimsey was used to staying at home on such occasions, for 
they meant an extra dollar for the family treasury, and 
oftentimes left-over things from the party that did for dinner 
the next day. But tonight Jimsey was particularly un- 
happy, in spite of the fact that he had twenty-five cents. 
True, it had taken a long time for him to get that much — 
for ever since last spring he had been saving his pennies. 
At school Jimsey had heard from the teacher about the 
Christmas spirit. Half dazed he had listened to the other 
little boys and girls as they, in proud anticipation, told 
what they were going to give their fathers and mothers. 
Jimsey wanted to give his mother a present — but what was 
it going to be and how would he get it? The little boy who 
sat next to him was going to help his father give his mother 
a seal-skiu coat — and right after school they were to pick it 
out at the big store. Jimsey wondered how much a seal- 
skin coat would cost. He thought of the old shabby shawl 
that mother had to wear. 

"My, wouldn't a brand new coat please mother though!" 

But what was a boy with only twenty-five cents going to 
do about it? The gloom over Jimsey's soul only darkened 
as he thought. 

The street of the tenement was dark and dreary. The 
only light was the white snow as it fell. Out of the dark 
entrance a small figure emerged hesitatingly. Jimsey 
could stand it no longer. 

Uptown where the big stores were, the large street lights 
made it look like day. Crowds of Christmas shoppers were 
hurrying along, their arms full of strange shaped packages. 

Page Nineteen 



The C o I I e g" e G recti ng-s 





Crowds were filled with Christmas spirit, happy, bustling, 
and pushiug>jtheir way to their coveted purchases. Jimsey 
stopped at the corner and hesitated. He had never seen 
the street so light or so many people on it at night. Then 
turning into the crowd he trudged along the inside of the 
walk next to the gaily decorated windows. Inside were 
the people making their purchases without a thought of 
those who might envy them. The boy stopped before a 
window of a candy shop. The window was glistening with 
white and tinsel. Huge boxes with holly and green on the 
covers were lying open, showing the tempting sweets 
Jimsey wondered how that kind of candy would taste. His 
acquaintance with candy was limited to the penny pur- 
chase of the little corner grocery near his home. His whole 
twenty-five would buy but a few pieces of this. With a 
sigh for what might be he moved on to the next window. 
Here were displayed hundreds of toys of every imaginable 
kind. There in the center of the window was a complete 
railway train running around and around. Near it stood 
a small automobile almost like the big one standing that 
very moment by the curb. 

"My, couldn't a fellow have a great time with one of 
those," thought Jimsey. "I wouldn't have to just sit at 
home and make believe then." 

Another sigh and Jimsey moved on to the next window 
and so on up the street. Everywhere was the sign of 
Christmas. Every window beckoned forth to the shoppers, 
each more temptingly than the last. Over it all there hung 
before Jimsey the invisible sign "For those who have 
money." Truly thought Jimsey: 

"Christmas was not made for poor little boys." 

Sadder and sadder the little boy moved along with the 
happy crowd. Other little boys dressed in warm overcoats 
with bundles in their arms trudged along with their elders. 
No one noticed the forlorn little figure that timidly clung 
to the inside of the walk. 

Page Twenty 



The C o 1 1 e p- 1 G r e e t i )i ^ s 





At last he reached the big store and there in front of him 
were the beautiful coats that the boy in school had talked 
about. There were coats of shimmering seal — more coats 
than he thought people could ever wear. i\s he looked 
he imagined that he felt almost warm. For the moment 
the boy lost his sadness as he gazed. Strangely enough, 
they seemed almost his — then came the realization that 
they were no nearer his reach than had been the toys and 
the candy. 

And he wanted so much that mother should have one, 
for he knew how often she caught cold in her old shawl. 
Now maybe there Vk?as one cheap — but no, the cheapest one, 
the one v^^ay over in the corner at the back, almost hidden 
by the gorgeous affair in front, the cheapest one of the lot 
was — twenty-five dollars — and Jimsey had but twenty-five 
cents. It was too much. The complete disappointment — 
the full meaning of it all gripped Jimsey and slowly the big 
blue eyes filled with tears — then a sob and his frame shook. 
Suddenly Jimsey, blinded with tears, felt a soft hand on his 
shoulder. Then a soft voice spoke: 

"What is the trouble, dear?" 

"It's C-Christmas, a-and I've only g-got twenty-f-five 
cents, and they c-cost t-twenty-five dollars." 

"What, my dear?" 

"Those c-coats and m-mother only h-has a s-shawl." 

Then once more that awful choking, and again came the 
gushes of grief that filled the boy's soul. 

How the rest happened even Jimsey could not tell. Al- 
most as in a dream he found himself within the store stand- 
ing with the strange young lady before the gentlemanly 
clerk, who held garment after garment before him. Jimsey 
was too bewildered to speak: was it true? Could he have 
one of those coats for mother? He was afraid to speak lest 
the vision vanish. Finally he ventured, though half 
questioningly: 

"I guess that one will do." 

Page Twenty-one 





The College Greetings 



Then on they went to another part of the store. Jinisey 
slowly realized that Christmas was really Christmas and 
soon entered into the merry spirit of shopping. An over- 
coat, then a suit, shoes, even a huge box of candy, and 
ever so many other things — at least enough to make many 
a day to come into Christmas for Jinisey and mother. At 
last the fairy lady started him home, package laden. Jim- 
sey \vas too full for speech, but turning a happy little face 
to her, he said softly: 

"I guess that vou must be the good Christmas Angel." 

— G. U. '14. 



SPRIGS OF HOLLY 

Gretchen's litlle body ached in every part as she trudged 
wearily up the steep flight of stairs. Mother could not be 
in for an hour 5'^et, she pondered, as her cold fingers fumbled 
with the key. The tiny room, as she looked around, was 
dreary enough — no flowers, no Christmas tree and no pre- 
sents, but then — and Gretchen grew cheerful — mother was 
to bring a bit of fruit and tonight they were going to have 
plenty of fire. She chattered to herself while collecting 
the fuel, the-n kneeling before the tiny fireplace, she coaxed 
a few blazes into life. 

As the room became warm, Gretchen's head drooped and 
her eyes closed. 

A large room, bright with softly colored lights, and filled 
with gay, happy people, appeared before her. It seemed 
to be a fairy bower, with the beautiful Christmas symbols 
everywhere. Strange as it seemed, she was in the midst of 
an admiring group, clad in a misty rose colored gown, as 
laughing and clever as any. Entrancing music reached 
her ear; a dance was formed. In and out, she wove its 
mystic steps. Hov^ light her heart was! She could feel 
her eyes glow and her cheeks burn. Her joy was complete 
as she drifted about like a cloud. 

Page Tweaty-two 





Bmm'MaiijgMmMiM^aaiamii^^ 



The C o 1 1 e g- e Greetings 



A pause, the dance ceased, and the great doors at the end 
of the hall were thrown open. There a marvelous tree 
stood, a shimmering mass of dazzling beauty. Hush! Kris 
Kringle was calling out names and handing down gaily- 
colored gifts; Gretchen gazed on, breathlessly. Here she 
saw a shawl, there a bright scarf, and beneath the tree were 
warm, fuzzy furs. Everywhere the pretty candles blazed. 
Fruits and candies there were in abundance. Surely her 
heart would burst with the great joy of it ail, when in be- 
wildered happiness, she heard her name called as the owner 
of all these treasures. 

Beyond the tree, she caught glimpses of a snowy banquet 
table. To that, too, she could go. Someone called her 
name. Jolly Kris beckoned, she started forward, but a 
touch upon her shoulder stopped her. Again her name 
was called. This time she raised her head slowly. Kris, 
the laden tree, the brilliant table, everything faded away. 
Above her stood her mother, holding out a delicious cake, 
liberally sprinkled with caraway seeds. — F. S. '15. 

"How cold and cheerless the shadowy room," sighed 
the weary girl as she felt herself sink slowly into the depths 
of the only easy chair the room afforded. 

Now and then when a stray flame blazed up from the 
scanty coals in the dingy grate, she could dimly discern 
the rude furniture. As she smoothed her ragged dress, her 
heart sank as she thought of better times than these, when 
she had not been alone, when all the comforts of life had 
been hers. It was Christmas eve, the happiest time of the 
year, but where was the glistening tree, the merry greet- 
ings, and most of all, the warm, loving spirit of the holiday 
season? That she should share none of these, her sur- 
rouniings said only too plainly. Povert)^ and loneliness 
were everywhere about her. She heard the wind howling 
dismally. She could see faintly the snow piled against 

Page Tweiity-tlir«« 



The College Greetings 





the window and drifting through the broken pane. Sobs 
of pity seemed almost to suffocate her. The gay voices 
that floated up mocked her in her desolation. How 
thoughtless were these light-hearted people, secure in the 
joy of plenty and the love of kindred. 

The beautiful, filmy creations, so cherished in girlhood, 
for which her soul ached, were not for her: all, everyone, 
were for others. She longed for a great fire-place with 
merry faces around it — here she sat alone. Her gifts 
should be many and love laden. Bitter, indeed, was the 
contrast of such a thought to her empty hands. 

The heavy perfume of roses seemed to envelope her. 
Half arising, she tried to grasp a cluster, held out to her, 
in the dark. Then sinking wearily back, she realized, in 
despair, that it was only a cruel vision. Her heart seemed 
bursting with hopelessness as it grew colder and the wind 
moaned more dismally. 

Then, gradually through the confused maze of thoughts, 
the girl became conscious of some one approaching. She 
felt a wave of w^armth. Vaguely she wondered who it 
could be. Nearer and nearer drew the presence. It took 
her hand and spoke softly. The terrible spell was broken. 
Opening her eyes, the girl looked about her own luxurious 
room, then into her mother's face, smiling down upon her. 

F. S. '15. 

Jamie turned away from the window shivering as the 
wind swept through his thin, tattered clothes. With his 
heart full of aching disappointment he had been watching 
the little boys and girls inside the large house dancing 
around a Christmas tree. Slowly he crept down the street 
in hopeless despair. He soon came upon the busy st eets 
where crowds of happy Christmas shoppers were making 
their last purchases. Gradually Jamie began to catch the 
Page Twenty-four 





The C o 1 1 e g- e Greetings 



spirit of the evening. He found himself looking eagerly at 
the window. 

"Pooh! What made me feel so badly; doesn't Santa re- 
member poor little boys as well as rich ones?" 

When the crowd began to thin out he ran joyfully round 
to the corner of the toy-shop to the barrel that served as his 
bed-room and nightly protection. How glad he was that 
he had saved the pin so as to close up the big hole in his 
stocking — for you never could tell, he thought, what Santa 
might put way down in the toe. Wasn't that nail just in 
the right place to hang the stocking? Sauta wouldn't have 
any trouble finding it there. 

"I sure am lucky. Wonder who thought of me and left 
it here,'' said Jamie, as he snatched an old gunny sack and 
wrapped around his little bare leg. 

Bven the barrel gave off an unaccustomed warmth as 
Jamie curled up inside it. 

Scarcely had dawn arrived when Jamie was up with a 
whoop and grabbed his stocking. At first he didn't under- 
stand — his face was masked in deep wonderment. Slowly 
understanding gripped hira and his pinched little face be- 
came distorted by realization of the truth. His once glori- 
ous dream of Santa had been dissipated. Half dazed he 
wandered around the streets all day, scarcely knowing and 
not caring where he went. Night time and the bright 
lights brought him to himself. Could he — could he stand 
the sight of joys denied him? He would try and perhaps — 
but no, Jamie's belief and faith were at an end. Last night 
he had gone tremblingly up to the big house where before 
his eyes were the things he dreamed of and so longed for. 
He could stand it no longer. Choking and sobbing Jamie 
crept away, insensible to everything but his own anguish 
and misery. — G. U. 

The roistering wind swept furiously up the long streets 
and sharply around corners, blowing the soft, powdery 

Page Twenty-five 




The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 




flakes in small eddies and whirls. The stars shone like 
small steel points in the clear gray sky of Christmas Eve. 
Inside the small house under the shelter of two tall, stiff 
fir trees, the cozy warmth of a grate fire and warm, shaded 
lights tried to dispel all idea of cold discomfort. In one 
corner of the snug room, a small but sturdy Christmas tree 
stood guard, softly aglow with the glimmer of colored 
candles. Miss I,etty's wheel chair, pulled up under the 
soft red rays from the light above the library table, com- 
pleted the cheery calm of the whole. Her snowyfcap rested 
above a face bright with happy plans and thoughts. The 
serene face was lighted up by the eyes, kindly, gentle, 
steady and glowing with anticipation. The small fragile 
hands moved rapidly through the maze of holly ribbons, 
the bright-colored stickers, sorting and arranging with 
practiced, loving touch the bewildering array of gaudy toys, 

A tinkle of the silver hand-bell within easy reach brought 
into the room a big, comfortable black gowned woman 
busily smoothing out the stifSy starched folds of her snowy 
apron. "Hannah, please hand me that pile of dolls over 
on the sofa. Each one must be labeled. Let me see, for 
lyucy shall it be the bright-haired baby in blue or that little 
sailor-boy in white? How little Annie's bright eyes will 
dance over the gorgeous lady in red with the feathered hat. 
And that biggest one in pink silk — ". Miss Letty's voice 
trailed off into silence. A strangely sad look of retrospec- 
tion flitted over her face. She seemed to be thinking deep- 
ly. As her eyes wandered slowly from the sputtering coals 
in the flickering glow of the fire-place back to the heaps of 
toys, her glance fell upon her two crutches leaning against 
the chair. As the thoughts of the past flooded over her 
the bright blue of her steady eyes deepened into dark 
purple. 

With a start, she turned back to the waiting Hannah, 
awkwardly holding the gorgeous dolls at arm's length. 
"Yes, my little lame Lizzie shall have the pink lady. Now 

Page Twenty-six 



mxmmmmiiim -t m t mai mMimiaimmji mmiim 




The C o 1 1 e g" e Greetings 



Hannah, put the little beauties up on the tree. There, 
that's right, I want them to be in the most conspicuous 
places — fasten them on tight with this holly ribbon. If one 
of them should get a broken crown, some one's heart would 
break. This horn and top are for Willy; since he saw them 
in Brown's toy window weeks ago he has talked nothing 
else. What did I get for Bobby? Oh yes, the cart and 
'the really horse with hair' as he calls it. I must wrap 
them up so his sharp eyes won't spy them the minute he 
comes in. Now put them away back in a dark corner." 

Speedily the heap of toys on the table was transformed 
into oddly shaped, humpy parcels gay with holly ribbon 
and each one nestled confidingly in the soft, green branches, 
seemingly aware of its tantalizingly suggestive outlines. 
The shade was gone from Miss jetty's face; she gazed 
happily at the stiff, prim little tree, its soft, feathery green 
branches dotted with the glow of candles and weighted 
down by the mysterious parcels. The dolls swayed coquet- 
tishly in their places. Miss I^etty sighed contentedly, 
"Oh, Hannah, that is perfect. Now I want to see just 
how it will look when my little friends first see it. Please 
turn off the lights. " The brightness faded from the red 
shaded light; only the grate fire and candles cut flickering 
lights and shades over the cozy room. Miss L<etty leaned 
forward, excitedly, eyes intent on the glistening tree, then 
sank back into her cushioned chair with a sigh of satis- 
faction. 

Suddenly there was a faint scuflBing noise on the snowy 
walk outside. Above the roar of the noisy wind sounded a 
chorus of wavering, husky voices, some of them hopelessly 
out of tune, but all of them raised in loving, joyous har- 
mony of purpose: 
"While shepherds watched their flocks by night, all seated 

on the ground. 
The Angel of the I^ord came down, and glory shone 

around." 

P age Twenty-eevea 



The C o 1 1 e o- e G 7' e e t i n jqt s 





As the notes died away, there was a rush of childish feet 
up the steps and Hannah just had time to throw open the 
door as the happy mob tumbled into the room. I^ittle 
lyizzie brought up the rear, her little crutcbes thumping 
joyously and her eyes forgetful of everything but the 
wonder of the Christmas tree. Miss I^etty's dream world 
was flooded with the brightness of Christmas joy and 
happiness. — M. H. '12. 

Not another thing in the stockings dangling in long, 
black limpness from the fire-place; the last gay-colored 
bon-bon and red, shiny apple had been delved from the toe. 
The tree in the corner stretched out its needled branches — 
bare except for the tinseled balls and fluffy strings of pop- 
corn. The floor, strewn Vt^ith holly-paper and bright ribbon 
told of the devastation of its laden boughs. In the living- 
room, pandemonium reigned. A busy little engine on a 
track was doing its best to drown the deafening clatter of a 
brass band, composed of horn and drum, while at intervals 
a steam engine was emitting weird shrieks. A Humpty 
Dumpty circus spread out in full array was performing feats 
wonderful to behold, although it was in imminent danger 
of being knocked over by an automobile of the latest model, 
threading its way through dense traffic. At a most crucial 
moment when the clown was in the act of balancing him- 
self on a ladder placed on a chair, came the call, 
"Breakfast!" 

Breakfast! on such a day as this? Breakfast! when the 
steam engine was working its smoothest and the New York 
I,imited had just made its second trip! Eggs and bacon 
when the most delectable sweets were at our disposal! 

But again, "Breakfast, children! Your toys can wait 
for awhile. Come! everyone of you. " — T. R. '14. 

Everything was ready. The lovely new doll in her red 
velvet coat and ermine furs, was tied at the front of the 

Page Twenty-eight 



r E3MRMMS a^g5E Sia ' i g K»3MSMSBmj«i^}'gaga !! i ! Riii^^ 



"^m 



The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 




tree, where it could not possibly escape being seen the very 
first thing; the new sled was pulled around in front of the piles 
of books and games at the base of the tree; the little white 
stockings filled with nuts and candy had been tied on every 
branch, and the beautiful Christmas angel, in the frame of 
tinsel, had been fastened in the very top of the tapering 
branches. 

It was nine o'clock — soon the children would becoming, 
thought Mrs. Martin, as she rose from her chair near the 
grate, laid down her work and went to look at the tree 
once more. Yes — everything was ready, every bundle tied 
on tight and every candle lighted. How surprised the 
children would be, for, as she reflected, it had been four 
years since she had been well enough to endure the con- 
fusion and the nervous strain attending the preparation of a 
Christmas tree. But this year, she and her husband had 
decided that the children's Christmas should be perfect. 
They had devoted all their spare time in planning for it, 
and now, it had come. Mrs. Martin smiled as she pictured 
the children's faces. She could not wait to see Eleanor 
stretch her eager arras toward her doll. How glad Billie 
w^ould be that it had snowed the day before, even if that 
morning he had strenuously objected to cleaning the walks. 

People were passing the house now — the entertainment 

at the church was over, she thought. They were on their 

way home. As eager as a child, she waited for the sound 

of the children's voices and her husband's step on the 
porch. 

Finally, she heard them. The door flew open and with 
a whirl wind of enthusiasm, the children rushed for their 
mother, both talking at once, telling of the songs and 
"pieces" and the funny old Santa Clans. Bat only for a 
moment did they stay in their mother's arms, for their eyes 
fell on the beautiful tree. 

"0-o-oh!" they shrieked in chorus, as they made a dash 
for the opposite side of the room and pranced madly around 
the tree, trying to see everything at once. 

Page Twenty-nine 




i MiMMamttiig gaBBaBBi 

The C o 1 1 e g- e G r e e t i n g' s 



"Hi, there — a sled," yelled Billie, triumphautly dragging 
it forth, his eyes shining. 

"Get me my dolly, quick, papa," commanded Eleanor, 
holding her arms up toward it. 

Then — after a time — when the excitement was over and 
Billie sat calmly on his sled trying to catch the "fish" in 
his new "fish pond", Eleanor looked up from the chair 
where she sat rocking her doll, and saw her father sitting 
near the fire-place, reading his paper. 

She looked at him a minute, and the tears came into her 
eyes. Laying her beloved doll on the floor, she ran sobbing 
to her mother. 

"Why, what is it, dear?" Mrs. Martin asked wonderingly. 

"Daddy didn't-didn't get any Christmas presents," 
sobbed Eleanor, creeping into her mother's arms. 

Mrs. Martin looked at her husband, and remembered. 
She looked again, but he had carefully raised his paper and 
she could not see his face. — R. Y. 



Nothing was left on the big Christmas tree but the 
glittering tinsel ornaments. Scattered around the room 
were gifts which gave full evidence that Santa Claus had 
come and gone. The children congregated in one corner 
of the room. Now and then, in spite of the repeated 
parental admonitions, Johnnie's automobile broke into the 
circle of older people, scattering them indiscriminately in 
all directions. The toys were held in common; fire com- 
panies, aeroplanes, engines and cars, Noah's arks and 
blocks, heaped up in a pile, surrounded by their admiring 
owners. They had long since forgotten which plaything 
belonged to which child. Whatever one wanted, he grabb- 
ed, hugged it close to him for a minute, examined it, and 
threw it down to take up something new. Occasionally, 
when Harold took too much delight in a certain woolly 
dog, little Jack immediately craved it for his own, where- 

Pftg« Thirty 



t mrsm t xjam t».'> i !j ! usmrj^iy»im^!mwissimm i 





The C o 1 1 e g" c Greeting's 



upon that dog bacatna the most desired of all the pile. 
Again the parents had to be pressed into service, this time 
to place the dog high up on the mantel piece to be gazed 
upon equally by both would-be possessors. 

Three little girls contentedlj'' played "house" with new 
dolls, marvels of perfection. Now, greater even than the 
comparative lengths of sashes became the absorbing ques- 
tion of selecting names. All was going according to a 
most peaceful program, until one of the boys, momentarily 
tired of his latest treasure, playfully twitched a cnrl — an 
innocent act that called forth a shriek of indignation, fol- 
lowed by an energetic slap, 

A little apart from the older boys and girls, occupied;with 
books and games, sat Mary, rather dubiously surveying her 
hoard. Every one, remembering that she "loved to read", 
had given her a book. She looked with envy upon her 
cousin, whose list of presents included all the foolish and 
unsubstantial furbelows which delight a girl's heart. She 
envied Bob's enthusiasm, for Bob was in the height of his 
glory. At last father had trusted him with a rifle, "a 
dinger of a twenty-two". Now those sparrows had better 
look out! Little could he understand the ill-concealed 
moping of his sixteen year old sister. True, she had been 
given a bracelet, two rings, a new locket, and a vanity-box, 
but the worlds she would have given for a little finger ring 
with the letters of her sorority embossed upon it. — C. C. 



Mrs. Jones was adjusting the decoration of holly and 
mistletoe on the hall chandelier, when the chair, upon 
which she was standing, slipped, and she found herself in a 
heap on the floor. Fortunately, the fall did nothing more 
than to shake her up a bit and ruffle her temper, for as Mrs. 
Jones was remarking to herself: "No time to waste falling 
down when there's a hundred and one things to be done 

Page Thirty-on* 



r.58MiHi<!«BiaiBMM»a*i!LWims«mM^^ 



The College G r e e t i n g- s 




before the joyful morrow, Christmas day," — and rather 
tartly her voice emphasized the "joyful". 

At this point, Mrs. Adams, the next door neighbor, an- 
nounced her presence by "Why, Sarah Jones, what a;-<? you 
doing on the floor? Here, pick yourself up," she exclaim- 
ed, lending a hand. "I just ran over to see if you needed 
help. You see, I haven't any children to plan for, and I 
know they make a lot of difference. Can't I string cran- 
berries for the tree, or something like that?'' 

"Yes, there's a plenty to do, so much that I can't see my 
way clear," she continued, as she pushed in the loose hair- 
pins. "Merry Christmas, indeed," she said, pressing her 
hands to her throbbing head, "I think rather that I'll be 
sick abed. Just so the children are happy, though, it 
doesn't seem to matter much about us grown folks." 

The cloud of sympathy could not quite overcast the beam- 
ing good nature in Mrs. Adam's round face. "Cheer up, 
Sarah, you just go on with your work and I'll attend to the 
tree. I know how it ought to look, even if I haven't had 
one of my own for nearly forty odd years." 

"Oh, yes, there's Nellie's doll to finish dressing, Johnny's 
skates to be exchanged, the candy bags for the tree to be 
sewed, the plum pudding to make, and — oh, those pies 
must be burned to a ciuder," she shrieked, as she fled to 
the kitchen. In a few minutes she returned, wringing her 
hands and with a look of dismay stamped on her face, she 
ejaculated: "Julia, I don't know what to do! Not a minute 
to make any more pies and pies they will have for Christ- 
mas dinner.'' 

"Now, Sarah, you sit right down. I've got something 
to say, and it's going to be said," she asserted, as she 
pushed the tired woman into a chair. "I've seen you for 
three years now at this, almost distracted with work, and 
there isn't any sense in it. You're not going to wear your- 
self out like this again. You say, 'it doesn't seem to 
matter much about us grown folks'. Well, I rather guess 
Page Thirty -two 



The C o 1 1 e g' e Greeting-s 





it does! The spirit of Christmas depends upon us and what 
kind of a spirit do you think you're showing? The child- 
ren look to you for their happy Christmas and you go 
around all dragged out and looking like — well, all I've got 
to say is, you're foolish. You could be happier and the 
children into the bargain, if you'd only think more of your 
own feelings. We hear a deal about a sane 'fourth' — I'd 
like to see a little sense in Christmas. Now, these trim- 
miu's are ready; as soon's that tree's fixed, you go to bed 
and rest awhile. Yes, rest, I say." With this parting 
shot she was gone. 

Mrs. Jones sat, huddled up in her chair, staring in dazed 
silence at the strings of cranberries on the table beside her. 
A frown gathered between her eyes, but iu a minute passed 
away, as the happy tears came. "Julia's right," she said, 
at last, "I'm going to be merry zvith the children." — B. B. 



Outside the street lamps reflected the Christmas snow 
falling in great, soft flakes, heaping the drifts higher and 
higher. Inside the firelight lighted faintly the big, old- 
fashioned room, and lingered lovingly on two snowy white 
heads very close together. Had the smoldering logs blazed 
for an instant, one might have seen that tears dimmed the 
wistful, far-away look in the old eyes. 

"Christmas Eve! It jest somehow don't seem natural 
without the children, Mary. * * * Never been away 
before, hev' they? Seems as if Christmas couldn't be 
Christmas without Nancy and the Boy to be fussin' around 
and fixin' things up, and iaughin' and hollerin' and tryin' 
to drag each other and us under the mistletoe. * * * 
Just last year, wasn't it, they sawed down that young ever- 
green out in the back yard and come draggin' it in and — " 

"Tree! why, John, this is the first Christmas since Jackey 
was a little baby, we haven't had a tree. * * * jj-'g 
seemed all day as if I couldn't bear to have tonight come. 

Page Thirty-three 



^SiilfiiBj'Ega'HiL'ggaa.-aaaaffiarmBq 



^^ 



The C o 1 1 e p- e G r e e t i n s" s 



& 



It all come oyer me this morula' when I was up in the 
attic gettin' those things for the missionary box. I found 
all their things in that old hair-cloth trunk — all their 
candles and Christmas cards, all the playthings they've had 
since their first Christmas. Jest seems as if I can't stand it 
without the children." 

Did the little Christmas elves who want everyone to be 
happy at Yule tide whisper the big idea, or was it just the 
longing in two old hearts? 

"Why, mother, we'll hev that tree anyhow! I kin get 
one right quick from old Silas down to the store, and we 
kin fix it up ourselves!" 

"John! we couldn't ever do it! Yes we can too. You 
go and get that tree, an' I'll pop the corn while you're 
gone, an' — but what'U we do for presents? There ain't 
anything we kin put on it, if we do get it. I jest didn't 
feel like gettin' anything, somehow, this year. We'll hev' 
to give it up. There ain't no use to think about it." 

"Yes wife, there is too. 'Member that hair-cloth trunk! 
I'll jest tote that downstairs an' we'll hev that tree in a 
jiffy." 

An hour later lamplight and firelight aided shaking 
hands to tie mysterious packages on a gaily decked tree 
standing in one corner of the big room. 

"Look at this old doll of Nancy's, John. 'Member the 
Christmas we gave it to her and how scared and funny she 
was when it said 'Mama'; an' here's her dishes an' Jackey's 
old blue sweater an' his skates, and O John! here's — " 

They were so excited that neither heard the muffled foot- 
steps in the hall, nor the half smothered whisper — "I saj^, 
Nancy, what on earth can they be doing up this time of 
night? By Jove! do you suppose they're actually — ? 
Here, wait a minute, can't you? Why, Mother! Father! 
Merry Christmas!" 



"Johnnie! Johnnie! Is 'oo 'wake?" piped a voice from 
the regions of a tiny bed. 

Page Thirty-lour 



The C o 1 1 e g' c Greetings 

"Um-huh," came a sleepy drawl from another. 

"Johnnie, ididn't 'oo hear something?'' the shrill little 
voice again sounded through the darkness. 

"Um-uh," was the indifferent answer. 

"Johnnie, 'oos not awake — just playin' pretend." Marie 
climbed out of her crib, carefully picked her way across the 
room and began to shake lier brother vigorously. 

Johnnie sat up and jammed his tin}^ fists into the stub- 
born eyes. "S' matter?" quavered the startled voice. 

Then Marie began her breathless explanation. "I was 
just a sleepin', as nice, an' den I heard de funniest n.Jse, 
'ike a whole lot o' dolls an' uver tings hittin' 'gainst each 
uver, an' den I heard someone whisper real low, 'ike dey 
didn't want us to hear. I just know 'twas Santa Claus, 
'cause pitty soon dere was some sleigh bells, and it didn't 
sound 'ike horses but 'ike reindeers.'' 

Before she had finished, Johnnie had clambered out of 
his bed. "'Ets go see," he lisped. 

Clasping hands, they toddled into the living room, where 
by the dying fire, they could distinguish two fantastic 
shapes dangling by the fire place. Each child grasped a 
stocking and began to poke vigorously. "Don't dare take 
nuffin' out, 'cause if 'oo do, Santa Claus 'ill turn and take 
'em all back. Mama said so,'' Marie warned, shaking her 
head knowingly. Then, almost in the same breath, she 
cried: "Johnnie, feel here. Feel here quick. Here's a 
doll wif curls — nuffin but dolls has curls — an' I bet its dot a 
boo dwess an' pink hat, an' — . " 

But Johnnie was too interested in his own investigation 
to heed Marie's excitement. "A gweat big top," he 
squealed, "an' marbles, 'ots a marbles, a wed ball. See! 
see!" 

"Marbles, an' a wed ball," Marie mocked, "'oo tan' t tell 
dat by punchin'. I bet it's candy an' a orange. But 
Johnnie, see here." She had left her stocking and was 
busily feeling the packages strewn on the floor. "Listen 

Page Thirty-five 





rr 


The C o 1 1 e g- e Greetings 

) c 






\ 


b^ 


^^S^ 



at dese dishes wattle. Here's a picture book. Dis is a 
doll's dwess, 'cause it punches soft. Johnnie, where is 'oo?" 

"Here," sounded from the corner. Marie turned. There 
sat Johnnie astride a new hobby horse. 

"Oh!" Marie's voice quavered with indignation. "Dats 
just as bad as pullin' tings out. Now we've bof got to stop. 
It's cheatiu' Santa." She grabbed his am and jerked him 
off the horse. 

"It's no badder den v/attlin' dishes,'' he whimpered. 

Marie hesitated, "Well, maybe it ain't, but ets stop." 

Silently the children trudged into the other room and 
climbed in bed. Then Johnnie's plaintive voice broke the 
silence, "Sisser, what was dat ting dere by my horse? 
Didn't it 'ook 'ike a tool chest?" 

"Naw," scorned Marie, "bet 'twas my dolltwunk." 

Johnnie began to sob. 

"Don't twy, Buvver," Marie said consolingly, "I 'spect 
dat was a horn in dat pink paper." 

'Es," was the quick answer, "an' a fiddle, an' a dwum 
an'—" 

"Oo can't have everyting," Marie interrupted. 

""gjKs I tan too," he began to sob again. 

Marie drew a deep sigh. "'Ets go to seep, or we never 
'ill wake up to see what he did bwing. Now don't say 
anuver word," she admonished. 

The children tossed and tumbled for awhile, then all was 
still. The sandman triumphed at last. — E. E. '14. 

The day was dark and gloomy. The rain was falling in 
torrents, turning the dirty, soot streaked snow into slush. 

Mrs. Martin sat by the window, unconsciously listening 
to the monotonous falling of the rain, as she tried to read 
by the dull gray light. 

At a louder shriek than usual from the play room up- 
stairs, she wearily raised her eyes from her book, and look- 
Page Thirty-six; 



^^ss^^^Bssaimaa 




ed around her. Although she had picked up broken toys 
that morning until her head ached, the children had again 
strewed the house with segments of games, tin soldiers, ten 
pins and dominoes, in such hopeless confusion that she had 
no courage to attempt a second clearance. The fire in the 
grate had gone down until the coals glimmered through a 
bed of ashes and the room was beginning to get cold. In 
the corner stood the Christmas tree, stripped of it burden, 
its branches bare and broken. Pieces of tinsel and strings 
of dirty popcorn and crushed cranberries hung on the lower 
branches and lay on the floor, while evergreen, holly ribbon 
and tissue paper surrounded the base of the tree. The top 
of the library table was a confusion of doll clothes, hair 
ribbons, books and handkerchiefs. Billie's football reposed 
gracefully on the mantel while his skates held undisputed 
possession of a mahogany chair. Eleanor's new doll dishes, 
three of them broken, lay on the tile hearth; near them 
were two tiny shoes. Billie's sweater and new overcoat 
covered the sofa; his hockey club was safe from molestation 
on top of the book-case. 

Mrs. Martin heard Eleanor scream again, then a scuffle 
overhead and more shrieks; but she did not go to the rescue. 
She was completely exhausted — for it was the day after 
Christmas.— R. Y. 



"Henry, isn't it about time for the mail carrier? Poor 
man, his cart is loaded down these Chiistmas days. Some 
folks might well learn a lesson of cheerfulness from the 
way he bears up under it all." This query and observa- 
tion came from a little gra}^ haired woman, busily engaged 
in patching by the window. Ever}' now and then her eyes 
turned from her task to look out over the snowy expanse to 
the road, around the bend of which she was waiting for the 
rural mail cart to appear. 

Her husband, replenishing the grate fire, looked up with 

Page Thirty-sevea 



The C o I I e o- e Greeting's 




a last vindictive poke. "Yes, it's time, Marthy. We 
ought to hear from the children this morning." He bent 
over the fire once more and overturned the glowing log. 
Great sparks flew in all directions, so that the old man 
drew back quickly as if in fear of singeing his beard. Heat 
showed both in face and voice, as he turned to his wife. 
"I don't know, though, as I want to see him, if he's going 
to bring any more shawls and tobacco pouches." 

"Have you been thinking of that, too? That's what I^ve 
been trying all morning to forget. It makes me sick at 
heart. Don't you remember how last year there were so 
many bedroom slippers that we didn't know what to do 
with 'em? Maybe, though," and her face brightened with 
hope — "they have talked it over together this year and 
won^t send so many of the same things. You know, Henry, 
that was a lovely shawl John's wife sent me yesterday; and 
even if ni}^ old one is good's new, I'm glad to have another." 

"Just then the old man's face lighted up, as he spied the 
red top of the mail cart. He hurriedly pulled on his great 
coat avid jammed bis fur cap down over his ears, and with 
an encouraging pat on his v«?ife's shoulder, was out of the 
door. She excitedly v,-atched him as the carrier loaded 
him with bundles and as he came hurrying back, joyously 
scuffling through the snow, As she threw open the door, 
a flurry of snow ushered him in. 

Henry stood by the fire for a mom lit, chafing his hands, 
as she tore off the VvTappings of the first bundle. When 
they made out from the wrappings the donor, he tentatively 
remarked, as she continued the untying of numberless 
strings, "Sam never did have any ideas about Christmas, 
so I 'spose lyOttie picked it out." 

"Henry," she cried, "just feel! It's something kinda 
hard — and soft, too. You don't suppose Lottie's sent me 
one of those new bags u'e saw in lovvn the other day, do 
you?" 

Both vv^ere as excited as children, for the last wrapping of 

Page Thirty-eight 



Ba;ns'^i!ta^i'XsaE3gtTigJt?r:??HagHg^^SBS9Ma^ 




The College Greeting's 



tissue paper was being stripped off. "Bedroom slippers!" 
came with a groan from the old man's lips, while his wife 
sank limply into a chair. "I thought last year they'd 
given us all of those things they could find. They must 
think we walk around a good share of the night, from the 
way they expect us to wear 'em out. From the start of 
things this year, though, I expected shawls for you and 
tobacco pouches for me. Well, Marthy," he said grimly, 
"we might as well have it over with. Let's see what's in 
the rest." 

Not daring to hope for happy surprises in the inclosures, 
silently they unwrapped the three remaining packages. 
For a moment neither spoke. Then the little woman^s 
head was bowed in her hands, tears trickling through her 
fingers, for around her was spread an array of shawls and 
various kinds of tobacco receptacles. Immediately he was 
beside her, comforting and rebellious at the same time. 
"Never mind, Marthy, we have each other. You and I 
know that we ain't as old as they think." 

"But why do they think that because we are older we 
don't care, that it ain't necessary to plaij together for our 
Christmas?" she sobbed. "I think ten times more of the 
Christmas card Sam's little Nancy sent me yesterday, — 
some thought behind that," she continued, as she pushed 
aside the fluffy mass at her feet. Suddenly she straightened 
up and her eyes flashed. "Henry, they've got to be shown! 
Maybe I'm wicked to feel that way, but do you know what 
I'm going to do? I'm going — yes, I'm going to lay all 
these things away, and next Christmas we'll send 'era to 
the children." — B. B. '14. 



<^?j^ 
W'W 



The large doors creaked on the frosty hinges; the cold 
air rushed in like clouds of smoke as a lantern cast its 
flickering rays through the long barn. The cows rattled 
the dusty stanchions as they struggled to their feet; a small 

Page Thirty-nine 



im^s^mmsmssisnw^^^^mtwssmm^ms^mmsi^gmmmmmmsmmmmmsrsm^^mMmmmmm 



'^m 



The C o 1 1 e or e Greeting's 



red calf stretched first one, then another, of his sleepy legs. 
The horses, sleepily, submitted to the vigorous movements 
of the curry-comb. Perched on a manger, a lone hen drew 
her head out from under her wing just in time to dodge a 
generous forkful of hay. A large black and white cat 
arched its back, Stretched and yawned, then settled down 
on the edge of the feed box. Then the doors creaked again, 
the dim light of the lantern disappeared, leaving the com- 
ing day to mark the faint outlines of the mangers and 
animals. 

There was a dull crunching of corn and the rustling of 
hay. Then the pet of the stable and the pride of the farm 
nudged her stallmate and said: "Merry Christmas, Pat." 

"Oh, is that why we got so many oats? I had forgotten 
all about it." 

"Forgotten about it!" came an incredulous voice from 
the guest stall. "I have been reminded of it daily for 
weeks, and yesterday when I was bringing those children 
out here, they couldn't wait for me to travel at a decent 
pace, but urged me through drifts so deep that a walk 
would have been difficult enough. There must be some- 
thing more in Christmas than I can see." 

The cat blinked her eyes. "Yes, those same children 
made life miserable for me. I guess Merry Christmas 
means pulling my tail and blowing in my ears. I came 
down here to stay until they go, though I do like to smell 
the cooking and to see all of the bustle and excitement." 

The word cooking quite upset the hen that was sitting 
on the edge of the manger. Petulantly, she said, "A sad 
Christmas! We are no more than through the dangers of 
Thanksgiving then we have to fear the slaughter of Christ- 
mas. Go by the chopping block and see the old gobbler's 
head and my brothers' heads lying in the bloody snow and 
you will think it a 'Merry Christmas'." 

A small plump, gray horse-of-all-work did not like this 
turn of the conversation. As she pushed the oats to one 

Page Forty 



The C o 1 1 e §• e G r e e t i n §• s 



side of her feed box she volunteered, "I've just had a jolly 
time helping get ready for Christmas. It's been fun to 
keep secrets and carry bundles around. You ought to have 
been in the woods when the boys had an exciting time try- 
ing to choose the prettiest tree, the tree that I brought 
home for them." 

"But it's terrible to be left alone," sobbed the hen, "I 
couldn't bear to go to the hen-house so I came here to sleep. 
The snow is red up there with their blood, the blood they 
shed when their lifeless bodies left the chopping block." 

—A. P. '14. 



Christmas Kve had come again and with it such excite- 
ment and commotion that quiet seemed impossible. The 
little old lady had waited patiently until the rest of the 
famity were wholly absorbed in the last preparations for 
the Christmas tree; then she slipped quietly away out of all 
the merriment and light into the darkness of the hall. 
Softly, very softly, she felt for the big package that bore 
her name, then, almost guiltily, she seized it in her frail 
hands and climbed the stairs. 

It was nice, very nice, to have a big strong son who 
wanted her in his home at Christmas time. All this she 
realized and on the morrow she would enter into his joy as 
heartily as the rest. All her other gifts she would save 
until then; but tonight, Christmas Eve, she wanted to be 
alone with the big brown box that had come from the far 
off city. All day she had been waiting for the evening, for 
just this opportunity; but once in her own room, she 
hesitated before cutting the stout strings. 

Wistfully her eyes sought the little sampler hanging by 
bed — the first Christmas gift Anna had ever made for her. 
How she loved it! Every single stitch had its meaning, 
and now here beside her lay the box from Anna, so big, so 
different, that it made the little girl and those first Christ- 
Page Forty-ow 



The C o I I e g" e G r e e t i n g" s 





mas' seem very far away. Softly she read the message of 
the motto hanging there on the wall: "Peace on earth, 
good will toward men." 

The tears stood in her eyes, as the process of unwrapping 
commenced. At last the strings were off, then she paused, 
reached for her glasses to examine more carefully the queer 
little sampler. Then she caught her breath as she came to 
the inner wrapping, — such a wealth of Santa Claus faces 
greeted her, smiling in a most friendly way from all over 
the paper. And the ribbons — they seemed more as if they 
were sprays of holly saying, "Merry Christmas," than real 
ribbons. Her fingers trembled as she broke the seals. 
Could it be her little Anna sending such wonderful things? 
She almost held her breath as she untied the beautiful 
bows. A great mass of white fluffiness met her eyes. For 
a long time she gazed at it in speechless happiness, then 
lovingly she fondled it until within its folds she found the 
little Christmas card bearing a Merry Christmas wish and 
happy words of long ago, "Peace on earth, good will to- 
ward men." — A. H. 

"Well, Mamma said maybe Santy'd leave me a doll at 
Grandpa's, Irene; and if he left you one last night, why, 
I'll get one, too — you just see.'' 

"You'll know 'fore long," said Irene, as we stood with 
four other cousins just outside the parlor door waiting 
breathlessly to see Grandpa's Christmas tree. Santa Claus 
had brought me a big doll swing and now my one desire 
was to have a doll large enough to fill it. After what seem- 
ed to us a never ending five minutes, the door opened and 
we saw the realization of the picture we had had in our 
minds for weeks. Immediately, I was caught by the sight, 
in the very top of the tree, of a dolly dressed in pink and 
white. I was completely happy, for Irene had told me all 
about the baby doll that Santa had brought her, before we 

Page Forty-two 



B W f flB I MWSt t lB WB aB M ^^ 




The C o 1 1 e g" e Greetings 



ever saw the Christmas tree, and now all I had to do was 
to be patient. My other presents were coming one by one, 
and I opened them as fast as I could in order that I might 
be ready to do nothing but love my pink doll. I looked 
up every minute to admire her and longed to get her in my 
arms. 

When I saw her being untied from the tree and as I 
thought I must, in this moment of triumph, appear uncon- 
cerned, I got up to mother just a little closer and said, 
"Don't you think my ring is pretty?" 

When I dared to look around, a lump, which would not 
go down, filled my throat. My pink dolly was in Irene's 
arms and its little head was close to her's. 

"Here, what is in this box?" Mother said as she put her 
arm around me, and began to untie the package. When I 
saw the contents, the lump seemed to get five times bigger, 
for there was a doll with a hickory nut face and a cheese 
cloth dress. Was this to be my longed for dolly? I had 
seen Irene kiss Aunt Jennie and thank her for her pink 
baby. I could only try to think what naughty things I nad 
done to deserve from the same dear Auntie a.doU sixinclies 
long and, worst of all, a doll with a hickory nut 'face. It 
took all the courage I could gather to thank Aunt Jennie 
for what to me was a mere nothing. Just then I saw Uncle 
John right behind her with a big brown box, and as I end- 
ed my thank-you speech, he handed me his gift. When I 
saw the ideal that had seemed lost to me ten minutes be- 
fore, I rau to mother and didn't stop crying until I heard 
Irene say, "I think that little nut dolly's cute." 

— E. J. A. '14. 

She was little and old and wrinkled. As the snow laden 
wind came sweeping past her, she drew her old tattered 
shawl closer and pressed nearer to the shop window — a 
wonderful window with its light and color and brightness. 

Page Forty-three 




The C o 1 1 e g" e Greetings 



Her hungry old eyes took in every jdetail; the portly form 
of Kris Kringle, his reindeers and his box of toys. Swiftly 
her mind reverted to the time when just such things as 
these were the delight of her own children, but that was 
long, long ago. 

Why should not she be one of this merry throng hurry- 
ing to and fro on missions of love? Why not forget for a 
while her poverty and just imagine she could have any, 
all of these wonderful treasures? For a time at least she 
could be like these people, act like these people and with 
them enjoy all the exhilirating delight of the Christmas 
time. 

With new light in her eyes and quicker heart beats, she 
entered the store. At first she could only stand and look 
and be glad. All the brilliancy and light dazzled her, and 
the noise of the crowd was bewildering. 

•'Something, madam?" and with a start she came back 
to earth. 

"O no — yes I-I think I'd like to look at the toys." 
Soon she found herself in a bright fairyland of child's de- 
light, drifting on with the crowd, absorbing the spirit of 
Christmas breathing everywhere. 

By the time she reached the doll counter, her old faded 
eyes were sparkling; the color came and went in the wrink- 
ed cheeks and the joy and wonder of it all made her heart 
leap strangely. Pausing at the counter she lifted a large, 
beautiful doll in her shaking hands. She fondled it ten- 
derly and held it close. Wouldd't Elizabeth love it? 
What a surprise it would be! 

"How much is this one, please?" she inquired of the 
clerk with an unwonted air of confidence. 

"Only five," was the short reply. 

"lyet me see — maybe I had better look farther before 
selecting one," she said, though as yet nothing dispelled 
her dream. With a little farewell pat she put the treasure 
back in its place. 

Page Forty-four 



The C o 1 1 e g- e Greetings 



m 



As she passed the counters laden with marvelous assort- 
ments of mechanical toys, she joyously overheard a by- 
stander requesting the clerk to wind up one of bears. She 
stood expectant. The funny antics made the old lady 
laugh aloud with delight. Benny would like this, she was 
sure. She could come back after a little to make her pur- 
chase. Her mystified delight increased as she came next 
to foot balls, base ball outfits, then whole houses furnished 
completely for little Miss Dolly. It was all so wonderful, 
she could hardly decide which she liked best. Ned want- 
ed a sled, too, and here were some beauties, with red bodies 
and yellow runners. Well, that could wait till she had in- 
spected the hobby horses. How real they looked, with 
their long flowing manes. She could almost hear Bobbie's 
crow of delight as he clucked to his gallant charger. 

On and on she went, pricing, considering, and always 
moving to the next display with a little i excuse. Always 
eager, always expectant, she hurried on with the crowd, 
experiencing all the joy and delight of the season. She 
forgot these children were children no more, forgot she was 
poor and penniless. Suddenly she discovered that the 
throng of late Christmas shoppers had vanished — salesmen 
were hastily covering counters. She must go. With her 
hand ou the door, she turned, gave one longing, hungry 
look at the entrancing scene; then with a deep sigh she 
vanished into the cold and fog of the December night. 

M. S. '15. 



THANKSGIVING DAY 

Thanksgiving at I. W. C. is always looked forward to as 
one of the most pleasant days of the college year. And 
Thanksgiving was, if possible, even more delightful than 
usual this year. 

The morning dawned bright and clear — a typical New 
England Thanksgiving. The bell for the much talked of 

Page Forty-five 




The C o 1 1 e §' e Greeting's 



corridor breakfast rang promptly at eight, and such a throng 
of chattering kiraona-clad girls as gathered in the third 
floor of Harker Hall and on the second floor of the main 
building! 

At ten o'clock the girls went to church, returning in time 
to don their pretty light gowns, which with their happy 
faces, added the finishing touch to the dining room as 
beautifully decored by the Freshmen in their class colors — 
rose and white. 

Whenthesumptuous turkey dinner was over. Dr. Harker, 
as only Dr. Harker can, introduced those who were to have 
toasts. The toast program centered about the theme, "The 
College Orchestra," and told how president, faculty und 
students each had a part to play in this orchestra. Mrs. 
Lambert told us of "The College Concerts;" Miss Rearick 
of "The Orchestra Drill;" Miss Weaver of "The Strings 
and Wind," and Mr. Donald Swarthout of "The Man with 
the Baton. " 

At the close of the program Dr. Harker told of the needs 
of the college and that it had, for a long time, been one of 
the desires of his heart that we might have a pipe organ. 
Then he most unexpectedly made the announcement that 
this desire had been gratified, that Dr. Welch had given us 
five thousand dollars for an organ to be placed in Music 
Hall. This seemed the crowning joy of the day, and every 
one was in the mood to make our old college song ring 
with enthusiasm. 

In the evening we assembled in the chapel for Dr. and 
Mrs. Harker's "surprise" for the girls. This surprise has 
always been delightful and this year was no exception. 
The Music faculty, assisted by Miss Loveday, gave us a 
most enjoyable two hours. 

As a conclusion to this happy day guests, faculty and 
students formed for the grand march through the halls and 
to the alcove, which was decorated with Dr. Welch's "ads" 
and where Dr. Welch's grape juice formed the center of 
attraction. 

Page Forty-six 



GEO. T. DOUGLAS 

FANCY GROCERmS 

234 West State St. 738 E. North St. 



A brig-ht and blessed Christmas Day, 
With echoes of the Ang-els' songf, 
And peace that cannot pass away, 
And holy gladness, calm and strong. 
And sweet heart carols, flowing free, 
This is my Christmas wish to thee. 



Joseph Heinl & Sons 

FLORISTS 
Jacksonville, 111. Both Phones 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 



DR. KOPPERL 
Dentist 

326 W. state St. 



SHOES 



We invite you to come to onr 

store and look over a line 

of shoes that are right 

W. T. REAUGH 

Fashionable Footwear 
South Side Sq. 



E. W. BASSETT 



0;C3L_L.E0fc. 


ub:wel-f?\^ 1 


Copper and Brass Goods, Desk Clocks, Desk Sets, Chaf- 


ing- Dishes, Percolators, Alcohol Stoves, Kettles. 


COLLEGE AND SOCIETY STATIONERY 


SPECIAL SOCIETY ENGRAVING 


DONE TO ORDER 

Kodak vSupplies Amateur Finishing 
21 South Side Square 


May the web of Christmas wishes 


Which spreads so far and wide 


Hold you in the happy spirit 
Of the o-ood old Christmas-tide. 


A BARGAIN 




IN STATIONERY 




78 Sheets of Linen Paper 
and 50 Envelopes to match 

all for 25c 


H. J. & L. M. SMITH 
Fancy Bazaar and Millinery 


Armstrongs Drug Store 


211 West state Street 


The Quality Store 




Southwest Corner Square 




A. L. BROMLEY 


I DO 


TAILOR 

315 W. State St. 111. Phone 169 
1 Suits, Coats and Skirts 
nmade to order by expert tailors 


Kodak Finishing- 
Bromide enlarging- 
Flashlig-hts 
and Views 


Clcaninof, Pressing-, Dying- 

and alterations of all kinds 

Special rates to students 


CLAUDE B. VAIL 

Oswald's Drug Store, 71 E. Side Square 


Work cuileJ iur and delivered promptly. 

i 


Residence Phone, 111. 1493 



The most dainty tilings in Rings and Jewelry. New 

and handsome styles of goods in Sterling Siver. 

Highest grades of Cut Glass, and every ^description 

of Spectacles and Kye Glasses 

Fine Diamonds a Speciality 

at 
RUSSELL & LYON'S 

West Side Square 
Both Phones 96 



May love and peace and happiness 
With dear old Christmas come, 
And brighten and protect and bless 
Thy heart and hearth and home. 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 E. State St. Jacksonville, 111. 

Illinois Telephone 388 



Ladies' High Grade, Late Style 
FUR SCARFS and MUFFS 



ARE SOLD BY 



Frank Byrns 



Most Reasonable Prices 



College Girls are invited to take 
advantage of the resources of this 
store for supplying their needs in 
the dry goods line. Dress Goods, 
Silks, Ribbons, Laces, Handker- 
chiefs, ets. are to be had here in 
attractive patterns at poplar prices. 




'JOCKEN H U LL BlDG.. JaCKSO NVI LLC. lit 



-A DELIGHTFUL RIDE" 
This will always be the or} 
if the rig- came from 
CHERRY'S 
Horses are fine travelers but 
g-entle and safe. 

All equipage the finest 
Call either phone 
CHERRY'S LIVERY 



MONTGOMERY & Dl^PPEi'S 

KVERYTHING IN DrY GoODS — WELL LIGHTED 

FIRST FLOOR CIvOAK AND vSUlT ROOM 

Agents for Ladies Home Jourual Patterns 

The new "Howd" front laced corsets 



May all the Season's joys be tliitie, 
Thy life made bright by love divine. 
And g-uided by God's perfect plan 
Of ''Peace on earth, good will to man". 



SNJi^RLY & TAYLOR 
Select Groceries 

221 West State Street 



GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 




Established 1890 

Low Prices, Square Dealing 
Keep us busy 



Illinois Phone 57 Bell Phone 92 

Fresh Drugs, Fancy Goods, 

Stationery 

THE 
BADGER DRUG STORE 

2 doors West of PostoflSce 
235 E. State Street. 



Dr. AivByn Lincoln Adams 

Oculist aud Aurist to 

School for the Blind 

323 W. State St. 

Practice limited to diseases of 

Eye, Bar, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 


Dr. R. R. BUCKTHORPE 
Dentist 

(111. House 1054. 
Phones-^ Bell. Office 512. 
( 111. Office 750. 

Over Hatch Drug Store 

Jacksonville, 111. 


After all, Christmas living- is the best kind of Christ- 
mas g-iving-. 


DENNIS SCHRAM 
Jeweler 

College Pins, Spoons, Etc. 

South Side Square 
JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 


DR. CARL E. BLACK 

Office— 349 E. State St. 
Telephone, either line, No. 85. 

Residence— 1305 West State Street 

Telephone, either line, No. 285 
Surgery— Passavant Memorial Hospit- 
al and Our Savior's Hospital 
Hospital Hours — 9 a. m. to 12 m. 
Office Hours — 1:30 to 4 p. m. Even- 
ings and Sundays by appointment 


BARGAIN BOOK STORE 

West State Street 


nmmm hair dresser 

I am prepared to manufacture hair 
combings in the latest style. Sham- 
pooing and scalp massage done by ap- 
pointment at your residence. 

FLORF.fiC[ KIRK KING 

503 W. College St. 111. Phone 837 



IE YOU ARE LOOKING 

for the latest in Suits, Ladies' Underwear, Ribbons, 

Laces, Embroidery Materials or Notions 

Visit the store that carries the 

up to date merchandise 

PHELPS & OSBORNE 


Life is in tune with harmony so deep, 

That when the notes are lowest 

Thou still canst lay thee down in peace and sleep. 

For God will not forget. — Henry Van Dyke. 


CHAS. M. HOPPER 
Dentist 

21* S. Side Square 


Brady Brothers 

Hardware, Cutlery 
Paints 


COOK 

LIGHT with GAS 

HEAT 

Jacksonville Railway & 
Li^ht Company 

224 South Main Street 


Fancy Toilets Christmas Goods 

COOVER & SHREVE'S 
Drug Store 

Kodaks and Supplies 

Developtng and Finishing 




Andre & Andre 

HOUSK FURNISHINGS OF QUALITY 

When you think of Furnishiug-s for 

the Home or Office 

THINK OF US 

48-50 North Side Square 



This is what I think of Christmas, 
It is the blessed, cherished isthmus 
That connects me once each year 
With the friends I hold so dear. 



The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital . . . |2oo,ooo 

Surplus . . . 20,000 

Deposits . . . i,roo,ooo 
U. S. Depository for Postal Savings Bank 
Julius e;. Strawn, President 
Miller Weir, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B.Orear, H.J.Rog- 
ers, A- A. Curry, C. B. Graff 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



We make a specialty of catering- to I. W. C. students 
We also make nice Birthday Cakes with dates and ini- 
itials and delicious new Sundaes which colleg*e g-irls 
appreciate so much. 
Phone us your wants and we will deliver same to colleg-e 
Let us furnish you an estimate on your next class recep- 
tion or social function of any kind. 
We have both phones. No. 227 

VICKERY & MERRIGAN 
Caterers 527 West State St. 



Matliis, Kamm & Shibe Say 

We can furnish your 

Shoes and Part}^ Slippers 

in the popular st34es 

leathers, and 

fabrics 



J. P. BROWN 

Sheet Music and Musical 
Merchandise 

Talking Machines and Supplies 

Mail Orders Solicited 

S. W, Cor. Square 



CHRISTMAS EVERYWHERE 

Christmas in the land of the fir and the pine, 
Christmas in lands of the palm tree and vine; 
Christmas where snow peaks stand solemn and white, 
Christmas where cornfields lie sunn}'- and bright. 

Everywhere, everywhere Christmas tonight. 



JOHN K. LONG 

Job Printing 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 

Ivoose Leaf Note Books 

Illinois Phone 400 

no North West St. 



[1111111 filu llliiiylLl 

ALL KINDS OF FRESH and 

SALT MEATS, FISH, 

POUI.TRY, ETC. 

Both Phones 196 230 W. State St. 



Dry Goods Store 

Safest Place 
to Trade 



Ask vour grocer for 



BREAD 

Made clean. Delivered clean 
in waxed paper wrappers 



F. J, WADDELL & CO, 

Suits, Coats, Costumes, Skirts, Waists, Corsets 

Muslia Underwear, Gloves, Hosiery 

Novelties and Newest Models 

Shown always at moderate prices 



Christmas where children are hopeful and g"ay, 
Christmas where old men are patient and g"ray; 
Christmas where peace like a dove in its flig-ht 
Broods o'er brave men in the thick of the iig"ht. 

E)verywhere, everywhere Christmas tonig-ht. 




We Repair Shoes 



THE NEW SHOE STORE 
For Dress "f Footwear 

The classy new shoe store is offering a classy 
lot of shoe styles. 

We make an extra effort to supply the wants 
of College trade in their various shoe wants, 
street shoes, dress slippers, lounging slippers. 

HOPPERS 

Southeast Corner Sq. 




BROTheSs 



Jacksonviilcs Largest M&ns' Store 
Pennants and Banners 

I. W. C. and Fraternity special designs 

Manish Cut Sweater Coats 

Hand Bags, Trunks 

and Suit Cases 



McCULLOUGH BROS. 

Professional 
Photog'raph ers 

Hockenhull Bldo-. 



PACIFIC HOTKIv 

H. Foulk J. B. Snell 
Proprietors 

JACKSONVILI/E, II.LINOIS 



McDougall's 

Photographs 

Represents 25 years experience 

West state Street 



For the Christ-child who comes is the Master of all — 
No palace too great and no cottag-e too small; 
The ang^els who welcome him sing- from the height 
"In the city of David a King" in his mig-ht — " 

Everywhere, everywhere, Christmas tonig^ht! 



"ROBERTS' for QUALITY" 

Is not a mere phrase. It is the foundation of our success 
and reputation and our aim for the future. 

ROBERTS BROTHERS 

HIGH GRADE GROCERY AND PHARMACY 

DELIVERY SERVICE PHONE 800 



VISIT 



EHNIES' 



FOR 



FRESH HOME MADE CANDY 

Pure Ice Cream and Soda Water 

Fine Box Chocolates 

216 EAST STATE ST. 



SKIRT BOXES 

ROCKKRS, SCREENS, DESKS 

AND BED ROOM CURTAINS 

AT 

JOHNSON, HACKETT & GUTHRIE'S 



Then let every heart keep its Christmas within; 
Christ's pity for sorrow, Christ's hatred of sin, 
Christ's care for the weakest, Christ's courag'e for rig-ht, 
Christ's dread of the darkness, Christ's love of the light. 
Everywhere, everywhere Christmas tonig-ht. 



F. E. Farrell E. E. Crabtree 

Established 1865 

F. G. FARRELL & CO. 

BANKERS 

Successors to First National Bank 

Jacksonville, 111. 



C. S. MARTIN 

Fine Pictures — Artistic Framing 

Frames and Ovals of all 

descriptions and sizes 

314 W. State St., Scott Block 

Jacksonville, 111. 




Prank Elliott, Prea. Wm.R.Routt, V-Pres. 
C. A. Jobnson. Cashier 

J. Allcrton Palmer, Asst Cashier 
J. Weir Elliott, Asst. Cashier 

ELLIOTT STATE BANK 

Jacksonville, 111. 
Capital $100,000 

Undivided Profits $ 56,000 

DIRECTORS 
Prank Elliott Prank R. Elliott 

J. Weir Elliott John A. Bellatti 

Wm. R. Routt C. A. Johnson 

Wm. S. Elliott 



IPboto ipottrafture 

Successor to 
The Watson Studio 

Southwest Corner Square 



Ivo, the stars of the miduig-ht which compass us round 
Shall see a strange glory and hear a sweet sound, 
And cry, "Look, the earth is aflame with delight, 
O sons of the morning rejoice at the sight!" 

Everywhere, everywhere Christmas tonight. 



V/e always have 

The Latest Novelties 

for Young Women 

We have made our success by 

anticipating 
Correct Styles for each season 

EVENING SHIPPERS 

JAMES McGINNIS & CO. 

62 E^st Side Square 



Piepsniirings Variety Store 

One block east of College 

HERE TO PLEASE 

Candies, Cakes, Cookies, Pies 

Sandwiches, Pop on Ice, 

Groceries, 

California Fruits, 

School Supplies 



I 

Designs, Cut Flowers 
Plants 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

Store: Pell Phone 154, 111. 182 

Greehouses, Bell 775 



GIRLS: Come and visit me 
at my little Hat Shop, 
give especial attention and 
prices to college girls. 

DORA P. ROBINSON 

537 South Diamond Street 



Zbc College (Breetfngs 

€|The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 
ijfContributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month 

^Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies 15c. 
^IJEntered at Jacksonville Postofl&ce as second class matter. 



Contents 

Editorial 3 

After Vacation, What? - > 5 

At the Box Office , . 6 

Fox Versus Chickens . ; .7 

A Ride Down Hill .10 

The Old Barn I,oft 11 

A Wired Ball 12 

Reperesentative French Art ............. 13 

Memories Revived ...... ...;...... 15 

A Poor Substitute 17 

The New Neighbors ; .• 19 

Locals ; . 20 

Alumnae Notes . 21 

Exchanges ; 23 



^ 



^ 



ka 



THE SNOW DROP 

Many, many welcomes, 
February fair maid, 
Ever as of old time, 
Solitary firstling 
Coming in' the cold time. 
Prophet of the gay time, 
Prophet of the May time. 
Prophet of the roses. 
Many, many welcomes, 
February fair maid. 

— Tennyson. 






ZhcCollCQC(3vcctinQQ 

Vol. XV. Jacksonville, 111., February, 1 912 No. 4 

Faculty Committee — Miss Weaver, Miss Tanner, Miss Cowgill 
Editor — Jauette C Powell 

Associate Editoks — Louise Gates, Helen Moore, Edith Lyles 
Business Managers — Annette Rearick, Myrtle Walker, Marian 
Lombard. 

I. W. C. has had many assurances that her "friends" 
are more than friends in name. Equipment, library and 
buildings attest not only their generosity but their un- 
bounded faith in the growth of the school. The latest gift 
marked the culmination of a long cherished vision — the 
vision of a pipe organ in Music Hall. All year the grow- 
ing demand for an organ has been felt. Increased interest 
in pipe organ practice and the holding of chapel services in 
Music Hall have made the need imperative. With the 
actual need came, at last, the realization. On Thanks- 
giving Day announcement was made that through the 
generosity of Dr. Welch a pipe organ would take its place 
among the "gifts" of the college. The appreciation of the 
students was expressed in no uncertain terms. Even a 
chapel service, given over to further celebration did not 
exhaust their appreciative enthusiasm. 

One realization, however, calls forth another vision. 
Already the new organ is creating other demands in con- 
sequence of which plans are rapidly taking form for a new 
building. Since the organ will be in use during the greater 
part of the recitation hours, the Expression Department 
feels the necessity of new Expression Halls, with better 
equipment for dramatic presentations. Much enthusiasm 
is manifested among the student body, and whatever form 
the plans for the enlargement and upbuilding of I. W. C. 
may take, there is promise of sustained interest and hearty 
co-operation from all connected with the institution. 

Page Three 



The College Greetings 




We are hearing mucb these days about plans for a still 
greater I. W. C. Wherever a need is felt there is a cor- 
responding activity. The library is receiving its due 
amount of attention, the new organ has both met and 
created demands, the endowment fund is growing, and 
everywhere more and more people are declaring themselves 
"friends" of I. W. C. It would seem that this is sufficient 
proof of the school's continued well-being. What more 
could be desired than present realizations and future hopes? 
We are, however, fortunately conscious that there is one 
thing needful; a thing very largely dependent on the stu- 
dent body. No matter how many gifts, no matter how 
much interest, no matter how much equipment, it is the 
students themselves that are making the institution as re- 
gards standards, for it is they with whom the question of 
scholarship rests. What they demand is what they will re- 
ceive. As the college increases, the standard of scholarship 
must advance, or the efforts for betterment will be largely 
purposeless. 

Now seems a particularly fitting time to consider such a 
question. The second semester, unattended by the strange- 
ness and confusion of the first offers new opportunities to 
those who disregarded the importance of a student's respon- 
sibilities to herself and to her college in this matter of 
scholarship. While no one admires the grind with her 
sneer at fun, no one can truly say she admires the girl who 
always "bluffs" and never "looks at a book.'' The time 
has come when the word student is no longer synonymous 
with grind. The student is the girl we all admire, the girl 
whose sense of porportion teaches her that study is right- 
fully first in a college. Pleasures there are in abundance, 
but these she makes subservient to her work. To her are 
given the places of greatest trust, on her depends the well 
being of the school. 

The public announcement of the academy grades, several 
weeks ago occasioned not a little shifting in seats and un- 
Page Pour 



The C o 1 1 e g- e Greet in g-s 




easy glances among the college classes, a wholesome 
symptom — may it be more than momentary. With the 
coming of the new semester each girl, fresh from some 
harrowing test, may resolve to "work hard"; but how long 
does this resolve last? Its length is usually all too depen- 
dent on the first clash of "study" and "spread". We all 
admit there isneed of both. Work and play have their 
place in the college girl's development; which, however, 
gains ascendency is the measure of what college has done 
for the girl and whatlthe girl has done for the college. The 
responsibility of the individual is no mean thing, for the 
present demand will determine the future standard. Of all 
thegifts of which the college stands in need, should not 
this gift of a high ideal of scholarship among her students 
rightfully take its place among the first? 



AFTER VACATION, WHAT? 

Before the listlessness and apathy, which is a sure ac- 
companiment of the return to school after the holidays, 
have worn off, deep dull melancholy settles down over the 
place. The secret of this terrible, threatening cloud, which 
obscures every pleasant thought, is found in one short word, 
exams. As the bugbear of the instructor and the horror to 
the student, they are dreaded and hated by all alike. The 
light, frivolous girl comes to her senses with a start of guilty 
realization. Thus far, she has calmly drifted; but, with 
the fatal reckoning upon her. she futilely tries to make up 
for the months of neglect by a few strenuous days of vigor- 
ous, but ineffectual cramming. The studious girl studies 
only the harder; from morning until night nothing but cram, 
cram, cram, until she wonders wearily how much more her 
head will hold. History dates, punctuation rules, intricate 
logarithmic functions hold high carnival in her poor, long 
suffering head. In her dreams, she struggles through long. 

Page FIT* 




The C o I I e g- e Greetings 



dark avenues, beset by unspeakable horrors in the shape of 
queer little personages who dance tantalizingly before her 
tortured eyes, jauntily chanting, 'What did I write? What 
are my dates? What was my influence on the literature of 
the time?' The whole atmosphere of the school seems to 
be changed; it is surcharged with strained tensity. The 
goal of everyone's endeavor seems to be 'exams*. After that 
— smooth sailing, rest, relief. The corridor teacher has no 
noisy, scurrying mob of girls to disperse and marshall to 
their rooms at the tap of the seven o'clock bell. The big 
lonely corridor is silent — its doors decorated solemnly with 
large, conspicuously lettered signs, flaunting the words, 
"Engaged to all". Behind those closed doors the girls, 
with heads bent low over voluminous history notes or 
puzzling problems and lips pursed with determination, are 
endeavoring to stow away all the knowledge possible in 
their throbbing heads. Kven in the library the change is 
noticeable. The lyadies Home Journal lies crisp and spot- 
less in its alloted nook; the latest copy of Harper's stands 
stiffly in its place with leaves still uncut. The tables once 
littered with confused heaps of magazines now groan with 
heavy, formidable looking reference books, for the fight is 
on. What a relief it is when the strain is over, the tension 
relaxes, and we slip back once more into our old comfort- 
able ways of living. — M. H. '12. 

^^ 
WW 

AT THE BOX OFFICE 

Finally, it was Jane's turn, and she stepped up to the 
box office of the theatre, saying, "Three seats, please." 

"At what performance?" asked the ticket seller. 

"Oh, Saturday afternoon — matinee. I forgot that there 
are six performances," she answered absent-mindedly. 

"And about what priced seats, pleasti?" again asked the 
ticket seller. 
Page Sis 





The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 



"Why, the best seats, of course. I always buy the best 
seats," she answered pertly. 

"Well, we have a few good box seats, — three dollars. " 

'•Three dollars? I don't believe I'll take those. I don't 
really care about sitting in a box, anyway." 

"These seats are left in the first six rows, — two dollars." 

"Two dollars? Well, I call that robbing. No, I don't 
care to sit so far down." 

"Then the next ten rows are one and a half," he patient- 
ly explained. 

"Why, you can get seats as good as that for half the 
price, at the Grand. No, I won't pay a dollar and a half. 
What are the balcony seats?" 

"One dollar, after the first six rows," he continued, 
growing disinterested. 

"Well, the price isn't so bad — but you can't hear well 
back there. ' ' 

"Would you please decide what you want? Remember, 
there is a line of people behind you, waiting." 

"Why, certainly, I 11 decide as soon as I find what I 
want. How much are gallery seats?" 

"Fifty cents," he answered shortly. 

"Are those the cheapest you have?" 

"The very cheapest," he said disgustedly. 

"Well, I don't see how I can go, if those are the cheapest. 
Anyway, I've seen Kthel Barrymore once and Saturday 
afternoon is the very afternoon I am invited to that bridge, 
party. Well, I'll just have to give it up, altogether." 

— F. F. 



FOX VERSUS CHICKEN 

The pride of Bob's heait was his chickens, a dozen or 
more white leghorns which were kept in the most fantastic of 
chicken houses — an original invention of Bob's — and fed 

P&se Sey«n 



The C o 1 1 e g" e Greetings 



and tended with the utmost care. Proud as Bob was^ his 
enthusiasm could not equal Fred's as he came racing home, 
late for dinner, with tlje wonderful news that Mr. Curtis, 
up in the next block, was going to give him a pet fox for 
his very own. Immediately after dinner Fred started on 
an exploring expedition to see if Bob bad left any boxes 
that would do for a fox kennel. 

"O, please, Marm, you'd better come quick, Marm, the 
boys is havin' an awful fight. ' ' Thus Katie, having watch- 
ed the boys as long as she could stand it without interfering, 
called Mrs. Harris. The mother rushed out toward the 
cloud of dust from which small arms and legs were sticking 
out in all directions and finally extricated from the heap 
two small boys. Bob was a few inches taller than his 
younger irresponsible brother, but Fred was as indignant 
as a twelve year old boy can be under such trying cir- 
cumstances. 

"Why, boys, what on earth's the matter?" 

"Well, I don't care. I guess I've got every bit as much 
right to have a fox as Bob has to have those ornery old 
chickens — and I'm going to have him, too. '' — and Fred 
kicked the ground viciously, wiping some of the dirt out of 
his eyes where Bob's grimy fist had landed it. 

"But, Mama, he needn't think he can keep his old fox 
in with my chickens, and he shan't, so there." 

"Well, my fox Is tame and won't hurt your chickens a 
single bit and you're an old stingy, that's what you are." 

"See here, boys, come up to the pump and let's get some 
of the dirt off your faces and then you can tell Mother 
what's the matter — Mother doesn't like to have her boys 
fight. Now come along like good little fellows." 

"Well, I can tell you what's the matter mighty quick 
and I know this, that Fred can't keep that old fox." 

"Now, Mother, I don't see that I need to fix another 
place; Bob's just stingy, that's all, and a tame fox would 
just enjoy being with the chickens, and — " 
P&K« Bight 



The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 




"Well, my chickens are too good to associate with any 
old fox of yours," put in Bob, between his frantic endeavors 
to get his face clean and at the same time keep the water 
from getting into his eyes. 

"Now let me suggest this plan," Mrs, Harris proposed 
when she had finally been made to understand that the 
place for the fox was the subject of the quarrel. "Freddie, 
you fix a nice box for your fox, all warm and cozy, and put 
it here in the corner of the yard. Then you can tie up the 
fox but give him room to run around and he'll not be near 
Bobbie's chickens and yet will have a good place to run in, 
too. Now won't that be fine?" 

So the discussion ended and Fred spent the next few 
days arranging the box, with frequent suggestions from 
Bob as to the exact relation that must exist between that 
outlawed corner of the yard and his precious chickens. 
At last the fateful day arrived, and late in the afternoon 
came th? fox but he was far too awed by the constant stream 
of visitors to move from his house, for Fred must bring 
every neighbor and friend to see his new pet. Dire threats 
still came from the direction of the chicken house as to the 
fate of the fox dared either of them trespass. 

After a last look at the fox Fred had gone up to bed and 
was peacefully dreaming that the fox was the envy of the 
whole town, that people were even coming from a distance 
to see the boy and his wonderful trained pet when — squak! 
squak! — and Bob was out of bed in a minute, for he would 
have heard those precious chickens in Egypt. 

"O, Fred, something's happened to my chickens." 

"Why — what's the matter?" — and the sleepy Fred fol- 
lowed his brother to the window and then pell mell down 
the stairs fled two pajama clad figures. Out there in the 
moonlight lay six of Bob's choicest chickens, while over 
the fence jumped the new pet, the chewed end of a rope 
hanging around his neck. 

"Didn't I tell you something was going to happen if you 

Page Nlae 




The C o 1 1 e g- e Greetings 



had that fox? And O, there's poor Orphan Annie — you'll 
just have — and here's Speckles — O!" a teary voice came 
from the chicken yard where Bob was brooding over his 
poor chickens to Fred as he sat on the steps, crying. 

"I don't care, 'cause my fox is gone and — boo hoo — you 
can get lots more chickens and I'll never, never have 
another fox. Oh! boo hoo." — I,. G. '12. 



A RIDE DOWN HILL 

Soon after commencement last year, our society held a 
picnic in the woods about two miles from town. After our 
noon dinner, we walked to a little old saw mill a short dis- 
tance away. It was at the top of a long and — for our part 
of the country — extremely steep hill. At the foot of the 
hill we found the running-gears of an old buggy; that is, 
the wheels with the connecting cross-pieces, and the shafts. 
We pulled the buggy to the top of the hill; two of the mos 
adventurous girls seated themselves on the cross-pieces, 
hesitated a moment, then guiding their horseless carriage 
by the shafts, took a swift ride down hill. Wish flushed 
faces and tumbled hair, they dragged the old buggy back 
to the summit where they waived their right to it in favor 
of three or four more of us. Finally after we had all, more 
or less fearfully, taken the breathless ride, we were 
ready to give up the sport, when someone conceived the 
brilliant idea of our descending en masse. With much 
pushing and shoving and no little enthusiasm, we crowded 
together into a somewhat tangled compactness. Then with 
a shout we were off. But suddenly a hush fell over us. 
Startled, we saw that we were rushing straight towards a 
large tree. We shouted to the girls that were guiding to 
change our course, but the heavy weight made the wheels 
unmanageable. With terrible directness we came toward 
the tree. A cold sweat broke out on our foreheads. With 

Page Ten 




The C o 1 1 e g- e Greetings 



nervous grip we clung to any available support. Suddenly 
four girls on the back jumped. Then, just a few feet from 
the tree, the wheels, in response to a final desperate effort, 
turned. The hill was so steep that the buggy upset, smash- 
ing the front wheels into kindling wood and hurling us into 
a confused heap. For a second we did not realize what 
had happened. The men at the sawmill came running to 
help us. Between their exertions and our own we managed 
to disentangle ourselves; then count twisted ankles and 
bruises. We looked at one another and began to laugh 
hysterically. Hair pins and combs, ribbons and torn pieces 
of clothing were scattered for yards around. The poor 
buggy resembled the probable appearance of the *• Wonder- 
ful One- Horse Shay" after its last trip. We laughed till 
we cried, then sat looking at one another helplessly. 

"Girls," said our president dryly, "the meeting i« 
adjourned." — I^. I. '14. 



THE OLD BARN LOFT 

One of my favorite retreats was the old barn loft. The 
room was little and low; the rafters, gray and projecting; 
the walls were covered everywhere with childish inscrip- 
tions. In the narrow room was only one small window, 
but myriads of cracks and knot-holes furnished suflScient 
light and ventilation. In many places, the floor was loose 
and treacherous, several boards were missing entirely, 
where we could sit with our feet dangling over the edge 
and fish for imaginery fish in an imaginary stream. In one 
corner was a wee stack of hay. the home of numerous small 
kittens. Here and there, the scattered hayseed had sprout- 
ed in the moist boards forming yivid patches of green in 
striking. contrast with the prevailing gray. Here we had 
built our fairy city, the home of our paper dolls. How real 
were the mansions of dry goods boxes, the rail fences 

Page EUeyen 




The College Greeting's 



of twigs, the shoe box auto, and even the tiny sprouting 
grass utilized both as a lawn and as a pasture for miniature 
horses and cattle. Here all was quiet and still. We were 
never annoyed by a hasty command from mother, sending 
us on distant errands or by a ravaging broom in the hands 
of an over-scrupulous maid. Our treasures could rest here 
in happy confusion undisturbed by unsympathetic hands. 

— E. E. '14. 



A WIRED BALL 

That evening I had gone out on the porch to read, but 
the game of croquet my two brothers were playing drew me 
from my story. I let the book lie open in my lap, so that 
I might retreat to it if my advice were asked on any dis- 
pute, for I had seen enough of these games to know that 
some arbiter would be necessary before the end. I remem- 
bered, also, very distinctly that I had never proved a suc- 
cessful peacemaker. 

This game was evidently being played to decide who was 
the better player, for my younger brother Don tauntingly 
said to Jack, "Oh, you're not the champion yet." Jack's 
reply that he was only fooling with him in the other games 
seemed to put new life in Don, as he struck his ball from 
the farthest end of the yard and knocked Jack's ball out of 
position for the middle arch toward the home stake. The 
ball had not hit before Don was there, as he said to "play- 
around." I held ray breath as he did play around to the 
place from which he had knocked Jack's ball, and, silently, 
I thought, "If you were just fooling the other games, its 
best to stop now." Jack's chance seemed to vanish, when 
he found his ball was wired. When Don turned around in 
time to see if I had noticed his spendid play, Jack decided 
there was a hole out of which it was lawful for him to lay 
his ball. He did lay out but Don turned before he struck; 

Pag* Tw«lT« 





The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 



and then trouble began. Back and forth they argued. 
The precedents that they recalled were to be wondered at. 
Don cited many examples of good players who would, 
under no consideration, allow a wired ball to be touched. 
That removing it was the only thing to do, was Jack's firm 
belief. Don, in his excitement, vowed he would not con- 
tinue the game unless the ball were replaced. Jack was 
willing to give it up, but just at this point Don, deciding 
the game was coming on far too well to be stopped, used all 
his persuasive powers. Jack threw down his mallet dis- 
gustedly, gave Don one look, and stalked away. Don lost 
ao opportunity then to say just what he thought, and look- 
ing up at me as Jack disappeared around the corner of the 
house, said with a superior air "Coward! Don't you 
think—" but I was occupied with my book. — E. J. A. '13. 



REPRESENTATIVE FRENCH ART 

Within the last decade American Art Museums have 
enriched the hearts of countless people by bringing from 
abroad various representative exhibitions of modern art. 
First to come was a collection from the Glasgow School of 
Painters, which was the revelation of a very virile art; fol- 
lowed in a few years by that remarkable collection from the 
Modern German School which created such wide-spread 
interest and pleasure, and only last year the marvelous ex- 
hibition of the work of Senor SoroUa, wonderful painter of 
sunshine, an exhibition full of charm and inspiration to 
laymen and painters alike; and now, through the persuasive 
efforts of Miss Sage, the director of the Albright Museum 
of Buffalo, a most remarkable exhibition of modern French 
Art is being held in the Chicago Art Institute. Shown 
first in Buffalo, it goes from Chicago to St. Louis, and we 
of the middle west are extremely fortunate in being so 
favored , for no other cities have been able to secure the 
exhibition. 

Page Thirt««n 




1 h e College Greeting's 



It is the exhibition of the Societe des Peintres et 
Sculpteurs of Paris. Never before has the society beett 
willing to exhibit outside of its own city, and it was only 
after a personal visit from Miss Sage to the studio of each 
of the painters, not only in Paris, but in Meudon, where 
Rodin creates, in Saint Cloud and various out-of-town 
studios where the members of the Society have their sum- 
mer residences, aided by the infiuence of Sorolla himself^ 
who has a deep faith in the future of American art, that 
the interest of these distinguished men was won, as well as 
the interest of the Directors oi the I^olivre and I^uxembourg 
and French Government officials. The annual exhibitions 
of this Society constitute the strongest oi all of the French 
artist fraternities and with Auguste Rodin at its head it 
holds a group of thirty painters and sculptors of great dis- 
tinction at home and abroad. 

A decidedly individual outlook marks the greatest charm 
of the exhibition, for it is no school that is represented, but 
the work and expression of the individuality of each 
separate painter and sculptor, and while it is marked by 
much freedom of expression, one is profoundly impressed 
with the seriousness and sincerity and absence of affectation 
in each man's work — and there is a decidedly spiritual 
quality in every example shown. Did you see only those 
wonderful marbles and bronzes by Rodin, that master than 
whom no other has so nearly equalled Michael Angelo you 
would be repaid. There is a "Danaide" so palpitating 
with life and breath, it is an almost living form, and a 
"Beethoven" of heroic size that is a powerful conception of 
that master of symphonies. Prince Troubetskoy contri- 
butes a number of charmingly executed bronze and plaster 
portraits and the work of several other sculptors is shown. 

To enjoy any work of art one must recreate its atmos- 
phere for himself, and remembering the traditions of French 
art, its wonderful history and present promise, one feels the 
atmosphere of the poetic and romantic French temperament 
Page Fountoen 



The Collect Greeting's 




very keenly. The modern arrangements of Lucien Simon 
have great personal charm; the sombre realism of the por- 
trayals of peasant life in Brittany by Cottet make one 
serious, while M. Rene Menard takes you into an atmos- 
phere of such charm and serenity as you imagine only 
Greece could give, for it is here and in Sicily he has sought 
his material, and breathed into it the true spirit of which 
dreams are made; beautiful in conception, noble in senti- 
ment, charming in color, his pictures are masterpieces. 
Eugene Carriere is represented by a number of enchanting 
pictures of childhood and motherhood, all done in an un- 
usual monochromatic color scheme, but vibrant with 
emotion and exquisite in feeling. Raffaelli's crisp portraits 
of places, the decorative panels of Edmund Aman-Jean, Bes- 
nards' portraits, beautiful in color and execution, and the 
gaiety of Gaston I^a Touche's Watteau-like compositions all 
carry their own atmosphere of charm and interest. The dig- 
nified innately charming work of Emile Blauche holds one's 
interest as do the pictures of Le Sidaner, Henri Martin, 
Dauchez and others. Two Americans are included in the 
list, Walter Gay and John W. Alexander, who shows a 
charming, graceful woman shadowed against an open win" 
dow — the same charming composition in line and form and 
color that always comes from his brush, A brief survey 
does not give opportunity for extended expression, but the 
exhibition is one of the most important in years, and viewed 
by the sympathetic observer gives a rare insight into 
modern French Art, for here are examples of the noblest 
and most expressive art that is being produced in France 
today, characterized as it is by so sincere and individual a 
spirit that the impression holds — one of permanent delight. 

— N. A. K. 



MEMORIES REVIVED 

One day last summer as I was rummaging in my closet 

Page Fifteen 



MMumimMiK^ieaBm 




The C o 1 1 e g" t Greeting's 



S^ 



my eyes fell upon my doll trunk, tucked snugly away in 
the corner: Hundreds of times had I seen it sitting there, 
but for years I had paid it no attention. Today, however, 
something prompted me to drag it forth by the remains of 
its broken leather handle. Beneath its dusty cover I dis- 
covered not only the little dresses, bits of silk and muslin 
that are usually found in doll trunks but a queer collection 
of relics saved from school days — papers, drawings, 
letters, boxes of water colors, pencils, trinkets, valu- 
able enough to me in their day. The outlook was tempt- 
ing. I turned the trunk upside down and dumped every- 
thing into a pile. Then I began an examination of each 
article. In a box containing several pencils, a book-mark, 
a tiny mirror, I selected the prize of the package — a horse- 
shoe magnet. I still have vivid recollections of the days 
when magnets were the rage in the fifth grade. We tested 
the magnetic properties of everything we touched, mag- 
netized all articles that could be magnetized, until even the 
teacher felt the effect of the wonderful force and attracted 
all magnets to himself. As another tin box fell open, I 
picked up water color pencils, paint brushes, and bits of 
charcoal, relics of the artistic period. I glanced up at two 
of the pictures on my wall. They, too, testified that there 
had been a time when I longed to be an artist, when my 
only ambition was to paint. Lying scattered about were 
some faded drawings that had been honored by a place in 
the row of pictures that adorned the walls of the fourth 
grade. Here were master works, Dutch blue lakes with 
pink and yellow skies, sepia light-houses standing upon 
rocky promontories to guide the course of a frail looking 
sepia sail-boat. As I laid them all carefully away again, I 
picked up a little booklet stuffed full of envelopes. These 
were memoirs of the sixth grade, promissory notes, checks, 
letters of recommendation, letters of introduction, business 
letters of various kinds, all written in most legible, vertical 
characters, and slipped into vertically addressed envelopes. 

Page Sixteen 





The College Greeting's 



With the booklet was a formidable roll of bills of credit and 
accounts, written in red and black ink. How they again 
brought before me the hours of toil spent over bookkeeping! 
An embossed envelope containing valentines reminded me 
instantly of the day when I found the big blue one lying 
on my desk after recess. There, too, were letters. The 
one in the square envelope, from my third grade teacher, 
had more than compensated for the sore throat that had 
kept me at home. Another was a birthday letter that 
Father had written from Denver on my tenth birthday. 
Most cherished of all was a postal card from abroad that I 
had looked at with awe, thinking how far and how long it 
must have travelled in order to reach me from Paris. Ly- 
ing under the letters was a little box where I found two 
little pebbles. East Indian pennies, the old bishop had ex- 
plained when he gave them to me. In the same box were 
some Indian bead and arrow-heads which we used to search 
for on the gravel walks. Last of all came the stack of 
yellow examination papers, saved out of nineties and hun- 
dreds. I smiled as I put them into the trunk again, won- 
dering why the present is storing away no trophies of A 
grades. — G. F. 



A POOR SUBSTITUTE 

"Come, Bobby, see how fast you can undress," Father 
called. 

"Why, Daddy, I tan't undwess myself," was the 
plaintive answer. 

"Now, Bobby, shame on you, a great big boy!" 

"I tan — maybe. Mamma don't make me anyways." 

"Alright, Daddy'll help you." 

"Don't unfasten dat! It comes off dis way. — See! Oh, 
Daddy! 'oo sticked Bobby. Mamma don't stick." 

"Bobby, you must sit still. You know Daddy didn't 
stick you." 

Page Seventeen 



The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 



s®e 



'"Es 'oo did. — See? Don't take dat off. Mamma 'eaves 
it on." 

"Alright, leave it on. Where's your nightie?" 

"Don't know. Mamma always dets it." 

"Well, where does she get it. You see her get it, don't 
you?" 

"'Es, but she dets it." 

"Well, where, then?" 

"If I tell '00, will 'oo det it?" 

"Yes, if y^u tell me quick." 

"It's on dat door. See!" 

"Alright, here it is. Put it on quick." 

"Mamma puts it on. — No not dat way. Fasten it in 
front.— See!" 

"Jump in bed now and go to sleep." 

"Mamma rocks me; sometimes anyways." 

Father rocks Bobby in silence for a few moments; then — 

"Mamma sings to Bobby." 

"Now, Bobby, Daddy can't sing. Go to sleep like a nice 
little man." 

"Sometimes mamma don't sing; den she tells stories — 
nice long stories, Daddy." 

"Alright; once there were three bears and " 

"Oh! I knows dat one Tell anuver one. Tell one 
'bout when 'oo was a 'ittle girl, 'ike mamma does." 

"Bobby! I never was a little girl. Be still and go to 
sleep." 

Silence for a few seconds, then persistent Bobby resumes: 

"Daddy, I'm thirsty, awful thirsty." 

"Well, here's a drink on the table all ready for you." 

Ise not thirsty for water, Ise thirsty for a cookie." 

'•I don't know where Mamma keeps the cookies. Go to 
sfeep." 

"I knows, Daddy. They'se in de kitchen in a gweat 
big jar." 

"Alright, lie fhere on the bed and I'll try to find one." 
Page Elsrhteen 





The C o 1 1 e §■ e Greeting's 



As Father leaves the room, the voice of Bobby foUovrs 
him with: "Daddy, where is 'oo? Ise 'fraid." 

"I'm huntiag you a cookie." 

"Hurry den, some'in '11 det me." 

"Can't find a cookie. Won't this do?" Father asks as he 
returns with a cracker. 

"Dessso. — Mamma'd found a cookie. But Mamma 

'oves Bobby, Bobby-don 't-' ike crackers — ^Bobby — 

'ikes — cookies. Bobby — 'ikes ." The little voice 

trailed away in sleep. — E. E. '14. 



THE NEW NEIGHBORS 

Miss Minerva was busy pruning roses in the front yard. 
Lovingly she lingered over each plant, snipping away the 
dead leaves and half-regretfully pinching off the buds. 
Now and then she paused to rest, pushing back the blue 
calico sunbonnet from the thin, sweet face and leaning back 
to view the result. It was during one of these brief respites 
that something unusual across the street caught her eye. 
The little drab house on the corner, for many years unoccu- 
pied, was this morning distinctly an abode of people — no 
longer a haunt of mice and spiders. Fascinated, Miss 
Minerva stared wonderingly. How had it ever happened 
that, after all these years, the old house where she had 
spent many happy hours with the friend of her girlhood 
and where afterward the beautiful girl had faded and died 
— what strange thing was this, that a family and a decid- 
edly lively one, was moving in? 

Miss Minerva left her roses and walked to the fence. 
Across the street the picketed gate was open, disclosing the 
mossy brick walk and the long, thorny arms of the rose- 
bushes, which had been hastily pushed aside. On the 
porch stood a mop in a wooden pail, and a heap of brush 
told of the destruction of the ancient wood-vine, which had 

Page Nln«teeD 





The C o 1 1 e g- e Greetings 



clung for generations to the rickety trellis. The shutters, 
once green but now a weather-beaten gray, admitted the 
bright rays of the morning sun, its beams dancing on the 
window-panes, now cleared of dust and cob-webs. Mis» 
Minerva watched a tall, broad-shouldered boy and a slender 
girl enveloped in a huge apron emerge from the side porch. 
They were dragging an old carpet which they threw on the 
ground and then ran to escape the clouds of dust. 

At that moment a moving-van backed up to the gate. 
This called forth a shout from the boy; and in answer to it,, 
the others appeared. A frail little woman, her head tied 
up in a towel hurried from the other side of the house, two 
gingham clad girls ran breathlessly down the steps, making 
a great clatter with a broom ani dust-pan, and a chubby 
little lad in rompers, with a sleepy looking kitten in his 
arms rolled from under the porch. There was great hurry 
and flurry, as each one lent his aid to the unloading. Even 
the baby gravely struggled with a stool. 

Miss Minerva went back thoughtfully to her pruning. 
"It does beat me," she murmured, "how that little house 
can hold 'em all. Before, there was just Elizabeth and her 
mother. Well, I'm getting old and finicky, I guess; but I 
do hope those children won't chase the cat." — F. R. 



LOCALS 

Dr. Wilson, pastor of one of the Presbyterian churches 
in Minneapolis, was a guest in chapel January ii. 

Helen Harrison, who has studying at home last semester, 
has returned to I. W. C. 

The old students are glad to welcome the many new girls 
who have entered since the holidays. 

Several of the girls were unavoidably detained at home 
until the beginning of the second week of school. 
Paige Twenty 





The C o 1 1 e g"e Greeting's 



The old girls welcome back Zelma Howe, who was called 
back home last year because of the lilness of her mother. 

A full account of Director aud Professor Swarthout's re- 
cital, January 27, will be givee in the March issue. 



ALUMNAE NOTES 

The death oi Mrs. Belle Paxson Drury, class of '63, re- 
moves from life one of I. W. C.'s most loyal and gifted 
daughters. 

Mrs. Drury was a daughter of the early pioneer Mission- 
ary, Stephen Paxson, who organized hundreds of Sunday- 
schools in the middle west during the days when such 
organizations were truly missionary efforts. It was this 
daughter's pleasure to write in her own graphic style the 
story of her fathre's heroic life. 

Mrs. Drury was a woman of rare mentality, of lofty aims 
and earnest purpose. Through all her years she was tire- 
less in her investigations and studies in nature, in literature, 
in art, and in all things that would enrich the mind and 
uplift the spirit. Her home was a center of an inclusive 
hospitality that welcomed friends, neighbors, the lonely 
and bereaved who needed sympathy and encouragement, 
men of letters, missionaries, and who-so-ever knocked at 
her door. She was the spirit of Catholicity, and her open 
minded tolerance extended her influence the wider. 

Mrs. Drury's going is a loss to the college, to the entire 
community, but the inspiration of her life lives in many 
hearts. 

Mrs. Alice McElroy Griffith, of the class of '52, spent 
part of the holiday season in Jacksonville with her daughter, 
Mrs. Pitner. Mrs. Griffith, although in the eighth decade 
of life, still has an active interest in the literary and social 
life of Springfield, where she has been a recognized leader 
in church and literary circles. 

Page Twent]rH>n« 





The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 



Mrs. Mary Huntley Metcalf, class of '59, and her hus- 
band, S. M. Metcalf, recently celebrated the fiftieth anni- 
versary of their wedding. Relatives and friends in a limit- 
ed number were delightfully entertained by this genial and 
gracious couple whose hearts remain young and full of 
cordial good will. 

Mrs. Jennie Kinman Ward, class of ^65, and her hus- 
band, Mr. John Ward, are visiting their daughfer, Mrs, 
Grace Ward Calhoun, class of '95, in Clemens, S. C. Mrs. 
Ward will remain through the winter. 

Mrs. Clara Woods Read, class of '74, recently visited in 
Jacksonville at the home of her 'sister, Mrs. J. T. King,, 
who is a member of the class of '79. Mrs. Read resides in 
Atlanta, Ga. 

Mrs. Manda Lanning JPalmer, class of '88, with her 
daughter and husband, Capt. John M. Palmer are now liv- 
ing in Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. Mabel Hooper Kern, '89, is the director of a vested 
choir of boys in the Methodist Episcopal Church in Mattoon, 
111. Twenty-four boys, her son among the number, are 
being trained, not in music only, but in devotion to the 
church and some responsibility for its support and useful- 
ness. 

Miss Manda Martin, '90, is one of the indefatigable 
workerf in the fine new First M. E. church in Decatur. In 
the Y. W. Missionary Society and in the Sunday school she 
finds her most congenial tasks and pleasures. 

Mrs. Reon Osborne Elliott, class of '96, and Mr. Elliott 
are happy over tqe advent of a winsome baby boy in their 
home at the Pattiagton in Chicago. The baby is the first 
grand-child in either the Osborne or the Elliott families 
and brings much joy with him. 

Page Twenty-two 




The C o 1 1 e g" L Greeting's 



EXCHANGES 

The Christmas numbers of our exchanges that were wait- 
ing for us when we returned after the holidays were un- 
usually attractive and Christmas pages find a responsive 
note in the glad spirit of joyous happiness that we have 
brought back with us. 

We are especially glad to welcome a new comer from over 
the sea, the Kwassni Quarterly from the students of 
Kwassni Jo Zakko at Nagasaki, Japan. It is a most inter- 
esting paper of a style in pleasing contrast to our other 
exchanges. A unique view point makes the articles of un- 
usual inteiest and there are tales of delightful happenings 
and earnest work in cherry-blossom land. 

We congratulate the Almanack on the number of poems 
among its pages — good poems are scarce among our ex- 
changes. There is a wealth of interesting material between 
the covers of this visitor. 

The Blackburnian is one of our best exchanges — its social 
notes are interestingly written. There is much of local in- 
terest along with some splendid editorials. 

We would suggest that the Optimist add some stories or 
clever sketches to the enthusiastic articles on the progress 
of the University. The articles show a splendid spirit in 
the student body — we wish you the good luck that your 
efforts deserve. 

The College Rambler is to be commended for its snappy 
editorials that discuss and suggest remedies for student 
problems. 

While the Augustana Advance has perhaps a less pleas- 
ing appearane thaj some of our exchanges we were greatly 
pleased with its contents. It is primarily a students' paper 
with articles that show careful work and free discussion of 
up-to-date student affairs. 

Pace Twenty-tlire« 



The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 




The Carthage Collegian is a neatly gotten up paper. 
The plan and description of the new Science Hall in the 
November number is of interest and we congratulate the 
College on its splendid prospects. The idea of continued 
stories is new to most of our exchanges, probably because 
of the difficulty in getting stories long enough and snappy 
enough to stand dividing. But "Under the Moonlit Sky" 
in the last two numbers of the Collegian has held our inter- 
est keenly. 

We have had one number of the Concept from Converse 
College, Spartanburg, S. C, and are anxious to form a 
better acquaintance with it. This number is full of excel- 
lent material, gotten up is an attractive style. 

The Rock ford Rallas' attractive appearance is but a 
pleasing promise of its contents. One story, "The Eyes of 
the Blind," with a theme not usually taken in college 
papers, is pathetically sweet. The paper is fortunate in 
having such a splendid list of advertisements that ought to 
assure, besides the interest of your merchants, a most suc- 
cessful financial year. 

Our only weekly visitor is the Illinois Advance that 
brings us greeting from the School for the Deaf. The 
paper — printing, editing, writing — is all done by the stu- 
dents and does great credit to their enthusiasm. 

The Hackettstonian comes to us this year for the first 
time. It stands high in our list with some exceptionally 
good stories. 

The Western Oxford is a neat paper that brings with it 
a novel suggestion of a rental collection of current fiction, 
a plan well worth adopting. The Inter-Collegiate notes in 
the December number suggests another good plan. One of 
the best of onr Christmas stories is "One Christmas Eve" 
in the Christmas number. 

Page Twenty-four 



GEO. T. DOUGLAS 

FANCY GROCE)RmS 

234 West State St. 738 E. North St. 



SAYINGS OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN 

"No men living- are more worthy to be trusted than 
those who toil up from poverty — none less inclined to 
take or touch ought which they have not honestly 
earned." 



Joseph Heinl & Sons 

FLORISTS 

Jacksonville, 111. Both Phones 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 



DR. KOPPERL 
Dentist 

326 W. state St. 



SHOES 



We invite you to come to onr 

store and look over a line 

of shoes that are rigfht 

W. T. RKAUGH 

Fashionable Footwear 
South Side Sq. 



E. W. BASSETT 

OOL-LECSiE UE\A/EL-FR>r 

Copper and Brass Goods, Desk Clocks, Desk Sets, Chaf- 
ing Dishes, Percolators, Alcohol Stoves, Kettles. 

colive:ge: and society stationery 

special society engraving 

done to order 

Kodak Supplies Amateur Finishing 

21 South Side Square 



"Suspicion or jealousy never did help any man in any 
situation." 



A BARGAIN 
IN STATIONERY 

78 Sheets of Linen Paper 
and 50 Envelopes to match 

all for 25c 

Armstrongs Drug Store 

The Quality Store 
Southwest Corner Square 



W A. PETERS 
TAILOR 

315 W. State St. 111. Phone 169 

Suits, Coats and Skirts 

made to order by expert tailors 

Cleaning", Pressing-, Dying" 

and alterations of all kinds 

Special rates to students 

Work called for and delivered promptly. 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 
Fancy Bazaar and Millinery 

211 West State Street 



I DO 

Kodak Finishing" 
Bromide enlarg"ing" 
Flashlig"hts 
and Views 

CLAUDE B. VAIL 

Oswald's Drug Store, 71 E. Side Square 
Residence Phone, 111. 1493 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe Say 

We can furnish your 

Shoes and Party Slippers 

in the popular styles 

leathers, and 

fabrics 


J. P. BROWN 

Sheet Music and Musical 

Merchandise 

Talking Machines and Supplies 

Mail Orders Solicited 

S. W. Cor. Square 


"Stand with anybody that stands rigfht. Stand with 
him while he is right, and part with him when he goes 
wrong-." 


JOHN K. LONG 
Job Printing- 
Engraved Cards and Invitations 
Loose Leaf Note Books 

Illinois Phone 400 

no North West St. 


Hillerby's 

Dry Goods Store 

Safest Place 
to Trade 


mm m\ 

ALL KINDS OF FRESH and 

SALT MEATS, FISH, 

POULTRY, ETC. 

Both Phones 196 230 W. State St. 


Ask your g-rocer for 

HOI,SUM 

BREAD 

Made clean. Delivered clean 
in waxed paper wrappers 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING 

for the latest in Suits, Ladies' Underwear, Ribbons, 

Laces, Embroidery Materials or Notions 

Visit the store that carries the 

up to date merchandise 

PHE:LPS & OSBORNE 


"There is no grievance that is a fit object of redress 
by mob law." 


CHAS. M. HOPPER 
Dentist 

2ii S. Side Square 


Brady Brothers 

Hardware, Cutlery 
Paints 


COOK 

LIGHT with GAS 

HEAT 

Jacksonville Railway & 
Ligfht Company 

224 South Main Street 


Fancy Toilets Christmas Goods 

COOVER & SHREVE'S 
Drug Store 

Kodaks and Supplies 

Developtng and Finishing 



The most dainty things in Ring's and Jewelry. New 

and handsome styles of g"oods in Sterling- Siver. 

Hig-hest grades of Cut Glass, and every 'description 

of Spectacles and Rye Glasses 

Pine Diamonds a Speciality 

at 

RUSSE)LL & LYON'S 

West Side Square 
Both Phones 96 



"God must like common people, or he would not have 
made so many of them." 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 E. State St. Jacksonville, 111. 
Illinois Telephone 388 



Ladies' High Grade, I^ate Style 
FUR SCARFS and MUFFS 

ARE SOLD BY 

Frank Byrns 

Most Reasonable Prices 



College Girls are invited to take 
advantage of the resources of this 
store for supplying their needs in 
the dry goods line. Dress Goods, 
Silks, Ribbons, Laces, Handker- 
chiefs, ets. are to be had here in 
attractive patterns at poplar prices. 




HOCKENHULL BlOC. JACKSONVILLE, ilL. 



"A DELIGHTFUL RIDE" 

This will always be the cry 

if the rig- came from 

CHERRY'S 

Horses are fine travelers but 
gentle and safe. 

All equipage the finest 
Call either phone 

CHERRY'S LIVERY 



MONTGOMERY & DEPPE'S 

Everything in Dry Goods— Well Lighted 
first floor cloak and vsuit room 

Agents for Ladies Home Journal Patterns 
The new "Howd" front laced corsets 


"Men are not flattered by being" shown that there has 
been a difference of purpose between them and the 
Almighty." 


SNERLY & TAYLOR 
Select Groceries 

221 West State Street 


Cloaks. St//rs. FurbanoMillinert^ 


^^^^^V^^nBLIl^Hl^L) ra<jo ^^^1 


^^^^^^ijACKSONVII.LB, /LL» 

Established 1890 

Low Prices, Square Dealing" 
Keep us busy 


GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 


Illinois Phone 57 Bell Phone 92 

Presh Drug's, Fancy Goods, 

Stationery 

THE 
BADGER DRUG STORE 

2 doors West of Postof&ce 
235 E. State Street. 




Andre & Andre 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS OF QUALITY 
When you think of Furnishing"s for 
the Home or Office 
THINK OF US 

48-50 North Side Square 



"The government must be preserved in spite of the 
acts of any man, or set of men." 



The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital . . . $200,000 

Surplus . . . 20,000 

Deposits . . . 1,100,000 
U. S. Depository for Postal Savings Bank 
Julius E. Strawn, President 
Miller Weir, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear, H.J.Rog- 
ers, A- A. Curry, C. B. Graff 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



We make a specialty of catering" to I. W. C. students 
We also make nice Birthday Cakes with dates and ini- 
itials and delicious new Sund2es which college g^irls 
appreciate so much. 
Phone us your wants and we vv^ill deliver same to college 
Let us furnish you an estimate on your next class recep- 
tion or social function of any kind. 
We have both phones. No. 227 

VICKFRY & MFRRIGAN 
Caterers 527 West State St. 



Dr. AivByn Lincoln Adams 

Oculist and Aurist to 

School for the Blind 

323 W. State St. 

Practice limited to diseases of 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 


Dr. R. R. BUCKTHORPE 
Dentist 

( 111. House 1054. 
PbonesK Bell. Office 512. 
1 111. Office 750. 

Over Hatch Drug Store 

Jacksonville, 111. 


"We will speak for freedom, and against slavery, as 
long- as the Constitution of our country guarantees free 
speech, until everywhere on this wide land the sun shall 
shine upon no man who goes forth to unrequited toil," 


DENNIS SCHRAM 

Jeweler 

College Pins, Spoons, Etc. 
South Side Square 

JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 


DR. CARL E. BLACK 

Office— 349 E. State St. 
Telephone, either line. No. 85. 

Residence — 1305 West State Street 

Telephone, either line. No. 285 
Surgery— Passavant Memorial Hospit- 
al and Our Savior's Hospital 
Hospital Hours — 9 a. m. to 12 m. 
Office Hours — 1:30 to 4 p. m. Even- 
ings and Sundays by appointment 


BARGAIN BOOK STORE 

West State Street 


EXPERIENCED HlllR DRESSER 

I am prepared to manufacture hair 
combing.'! in the latest style. Sham- 
pooing and scalp massage done by ap- 
pointment at your residence. 

FLORENCE KIRK KING 

503 W. College St. 111. Phone 837 



F. J. WADDELL & CO. 

Suits, Coats, Costumes, Skirts, Waists, Corsets 

Muslin Underwear, Gloves, Hosiery 

Novelties and Newest Models 

Shown always at moderate prices 



"Gold is g"ood in its place; but living", brave, and 
patriotic men are better than gold." 

"Let none falter who thinks he is right." 




We Repair Shoes 



THE NEW SHOE STORE 
For Dressy Footwear 

The classy new shoe store is offering a classy 
lot of shoe styles. 

We make an extra effort to supply the wants 
of College trade in their various shoe wants, 
street shoes, dress slippers, lounging slippers. 

HOPPERS 

Southeast Corner Sq. 




VERS 



Jacksonvilles Largest Mens' Store 

Pennants and Banners 

I. W. C. and Fraternity special designs 

Manish Cut Sweater Coats 
Hand Bags, Trunks 
and Suit Cases 



McCULLOUGH BROS. 

Professional 
Photographers 

Hockenhull Bldg. 



PACIFIC HOTE)L 

H. Foulk J. B. Snell 
Proprietors 

Jacksonville;, Illinois 



McDougaH's 

Photographs 

Represents 25 years experience 

West state Street 



"The way for a young" man to rise is to improve him- 
self every way he can, never suspecting- that anybody 
wishes to hinder him." 



"ROBERTS' for QUALITY" 

Is not a mere phrase. It is the foundation of our success 
and reputation and our aim for the future. 

ROBERTS BROTHERS 

HIGH grade: grocery AND PHARMACY 

DEIvIVERY service; PHONE 800 



VESIT 



EHNIES' -« 



FRESH HOME MADE CANDY 

Pure Ice Cream and Soda Water 

Pine Box Chocolates 

216 EAST STATE ST. 



SKIRT BOXES 

ROCKERS, SCREENS, DESKS 

AND BED ROOM CURTAINS 

AT 

JOHNSON, HACKETT & GUTHRIE'S 



"Let us have faith that right is might, and let us in 
that faith, to the end, dare to do our own duty as we 
understand it." 



F. E. Farrell E. E. Crabtree 

Established 1865 

P. G. FARREIvL & CO. 

BANKERS 

Successors to First National Bank 

Jacksonville, 111. 



C. S. MARTIN 

Fine Pictures — Artistic Framing 
Frames and Ovals of all 

descriptions and sizes 

314 W. State St., Scott Block 

Jacksonville, 111. 




]m^ 




Frank Elliott, Pres. Wm. R. Routt, V.-Pres. 

C. A. Johnson, Vice-Pres. 

J. Weir Elliott, Cashier 

J. AUerton Palmer, Asst. Cashier 

ELLIOTT STATE BANK 

Jacksonville, 111. 
Capital $150,000 

Undivided Profits $ 12,000 

DIRECTORS 
Frank Elliott Frank R. Elliott 

.1. Weir Elliott John A. Bellatti 

Wm. R. Routt C. A. Johnson 

Wm. S. Elliott 



Ipboto portraiture 

OXTCD ©F=»IEXH 

Successor to 
The Watson Studio 

Southwest Corner Square 



A TRIBUTE TO WASHINGTON 

"Washing"ton is the mightiest name of earth — long" 
since mightiest in the cause of civil liberty, still mightiest 
in moral reformation. On that name a eulogy is expect- 
ed. It cannot be. To add brightness to the sun or 
glory to the name of Washington is alike impossible. 
Let none attempt it." 



We always have 

The Latest Novelties 

for Young Women 

We have made our success by 

anticipating 

Correct Styles for each season 

EVENING SivIPPERS 

JAMES McGINNIS & CO. 

62 EBSt Side Square 



HARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO. 

Designs, Cut Flowers 
Plants 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

Store: Pell Phone 154, 111. 182 

Greehouses, Bell 775 



Piepenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 

HERE TO PLEASE 

Candies, Cakes, Cookies, Pies 

Sandwiches, Pop on Ice, 

Groceries, 

California Fruits, 

School Supplies 



GIRLS: Come and visit me 
at my little Hat Shop, 
give especial attention and 
prices to college girls. 

DORA P. ROBINSON 

537 South Diamond Street 



Zhc CoUeoe (Breetings 

€}fThe College Greetings is published mdrithly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 
^^Contributions to its pages are solicited from the Students 
of all departments, atid from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month 

'tjf Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable iti advance. Single 
copies 15c. 
€]jEntered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 



Contents 

Metrical Poems , . . 3 

Odd Numbers .6 

By Laughing Water ...*.. 8 

Bargain Hour » i 9 

Where Nuts Were Few 10 

Editorial 4 * 14 

Faculty Recital 15 

The Dickens Centennial 16 

Washington's Birthday . . . ^ ... . 17 

Convention at Monmouth . 18 

The Seniors 19 

Department Notes . . . s . . 20 

Chapel Notes . ..... 22 

Greetings from California 23 

Locals ........... k » 23 



"With rushing winds and gloomy skies 
The dark and stubborn winter dies: 
Far-off, unseen, Spring fairly cries. 
Bidding her earliest child arise; 
March." 

— Taylor, 




'gbe College (3reetinQ6 

Vol. XV. Jacksonville, 111., March, 1912 No. 5 

METRICAL TRANSLATIONS 
Horace, I, VHI 

Tell me why, by Gods I beg it, 
Tell me why, Oh pleasing I^ydia, 
You persist in ruining Sybaris 
By your tender gracious wooing? 
Tell me why he scorns the campus 
And the pastimes of the solaier, 
For to him there is none equal 
Taming horses or in combat. 
He no longer swims the Tiber, 
Ha avoids the boxing matches 
Fearing them as poisoned vipers. 
Tell me why you hide him with you 
Almost as the seaborn Thetis 
Hid Achilles with the maidens 
lyest he fall before the onset 
Of the mighty Trojan allies. 
There Ulysses by his cunning 
Found him scorning precious jewels 
Just to feel the polished sword-blade. 
Do yout Irydia, fear for Sybaris 
That you keep him with your cunning? 

—I.. G. '12. 



Horace, III, IX 

"Just as long as I pleased you and rivals lived not 
To embrace your white shoulders so fair, 

Persian kings might be happy, yet happier I 
lyived my life free from sorrow and care. ' ' 



Page Three 





The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 



"Just as long as no other caused your heart to burn 

And not Chloe but Lydia ranked first; 
Still more famous than Ilia of Rome I was known, 

Of renown then by no means the worst. ' ' 

"As for me Thracian Chloe now rules o'er my heart, 
She who sings and plays sweetly the lyre; 

I could die without fear, even gladly for her 

If the fates spared my love from death's fire.'^ 

"As for me, Thurian Calais, Ornytus' son, 

Burns my soul with reciprocal flame; 
I could suffer twice over to die for his sake. 

If the fates let him live here the same." 

"What if love, former love, should return to our hearts. 
Through her yoke parted lovers to chide? 

What if yellow-haired Chloe were yet shaken off, 
And shunned Lydia found doors opened wide?" 

"Although he is more handsome than bright gleaming stars, 
And more wrathful than rough seas are you ; 

Though your heart is less steadfast than light floating cork, 
Yet with you I'll live, gladly die too." 



Horace, I, XI 

• We cannot know as time rolls past 
But that today may be the last. 
And what God's plan for us may be 
He, in His wisdom, holds the key. 
The man is blessed who can say: 
"Whatever comes, I'll live today!" 
Lenconce, ask not again 
What stars may bring to happy men. 
For Babylonian numbers void 
Have many good men oft annoyed. 
And since your time is flying past, 

P&re Four 



The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's J 

Far from your heart your sorrow* cast. 

Promise always to joyful be 

And for it God will give you fee. 

Come on, come oni Strain now the wind 

Give to the hour and make it thine! 

Heed not the day that never comes, 

On your heart-strings bright joy now drums. 

— K. J. A. '13. 



Horace, Odes, I, 23 

You shun me, Chloe, like the doe, 
That seeks its frightened mother; 
As thru' the breezy wood you go 
The solitude makes you shudder. 
A rustle in the bramble bush. 
Of leaves by stray wind tossed; 
Or lizard in the blackberry bush. 
Quails your faint heart, when lost. 
But think not that I follow you 
To crush like a fierce wild beast, 
Then you, ripe age for one to woo, 
Come away from your mofher at least. 



Catullus 

Now Spring free from chill is fast returning, 

Now the maddening equinoctial heavens 

The mild Western wind calms with pleasant breeze. 

But Catullus will leave the grassy Phrygia 

And forsake the rich fields of hot Nicaea. 

Let us fly to the famous towns of Asia. 

Now the tremulous soul will long to wander. 

Now his feet are impatient, filled with longing. 

Oh, farewell to our pleasant bands of friends here. 

Those friends gone from their homes to far off new lands, 

Many various paths will carry homeward. 

— E. A. '12. 

Pai^e FIT* 




The C o 1 1 e §■ e Greeting's 



Catullus, 12 

Oh, Asinius Marrucinus, badly 

Both in feasting and revel have you acted, 

Those oblivious lose their valued napkins 

Do you think it so smart and witty, stupid?' 

It is totally sordid, very common. 

Trust me! Recognize that your brother wishes 

To make recompense for you e'en by money, 

He is erudite, gentle, witty, young, too; 

Bring the dainty napkins to me or else take 

Whate'er punishment you get, verses follow 

Now, I care only little for their value 

But Veranius and Fabullus gave them; 

The thread is of the finest — they're from old Spain — 

Of necessity I love them and these, too, 

My Veranius and Fabullus dearly. 

-L. C. '13. 



Catullus Epigrams, No. 86 

Fair-skinned and straight is Quintia, though others may 

call her handsome, 
Tall she is too, I will grant, points that will stand one by 

one. 
Beautiful can not describe her, for charm is not found in 

her body. 
Nor is there found in this girl one little morsel of salt. 
Iveabia merits the name that we cannot give to the other, 
She at her best will allure, she will take all of our love. 

— E. A. '12. 



**ODD NUMBERS" 

l,ong has the notion that ill luck attaches to numbers 
Pag« Six 




The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 



prevailed. That fate is determined by the dreaded thirteen 
seemed to me a laughable superstition. In~fact I had al- 
ways considered the dreaded thirteen of which some people 
stand in awe, as lucky rather than ill-omened. But within 
a week my proud independence of sign-provoked fears have 
suffered collapse. Now my conviction is firm that luck is 
forever banished from one and three when combined with 
February and nineteen hundred and twelve. 

You wonder why dread should fill the first days of this 
innocent month. Possibly your catalogue has not for 
months been stamping these dates as the half-semester ex- 
aminations. To me, however, the thought of their 
approach, the questions they involve and results they 
tabulate are gruesomely blended with my notion of February 
one and three. In truth my feeling that when I looked at 
the calendar February first stood protruding through the 
January leaf, has not proved a fear dispelled as groundless. 

The morning of February first I rushed to class at eight 
o'clock with a supply of sharpened pencils and a dazed 
head. Nervously I took my seat. Then, after a shudder 
in the face of danger, I bravely, almost defiantly, faced the 
chalk covered blackboard. For a moment I was exhilirated 
with confident joy when I spied as the first question a sub- 
ject that seemed almost friendly in its familiarity. Then 
the next instant down went all hope as I looked at nine 
other staring interrogations that flaunted in my face sub- 
jects that to my little knowledge were hostile and exclusive. 
To make matters worse I suddenly discovered that every 
one around me was busily writing. I stared, wrinkled my 
brow, fidgeted as if a shift in position might bring revela- 
tions. Some how the hour must have ended for I found 
myself gathering my pencils, collecting my papers in order, 
and surrendering them meekly to the instructor. Then I 
rushed out of the room and down the corridor; not to re- 
lease, but to a repetition of the ordeal in another classroom. 

The day continued with no alteration of miseries, only an 

Page Seven 



The College G r e e t i 7i g- s 



immaterial change of rooms and questions as hour-bells 
regulated the fatal program of this day. At last the four- 
fifteen bell brought an end to this torture. Slowly I went 
to my room; surely my head was empty but it felt too 
heavy for my shou'ders. 

On Friday my hopes arose. Only one examination 
scheduled! This day I should make ready in earnest — for 
Saturday. Not even a foot note should be skipped; I knew 
too well how they had always played for my defeat in 
history. 

Saturday the third loomed up before me. Of course, 
when I needed, not every moment, but every second, we 
were the last table to come from the breakfast room. An 
excuse that must be signed left me standing long in line 
before the dean's door, till I heard the peal of the eight 
o'clock bell. Late to my first examination — and it was 
model auxiliaries. The time for chapel I even begrudged, 
but go I must. Then came English, A theme to write in 
an hour! At the half hour bell I was still struggling over 
an introduction . At the end of the hour I left the room with 
the depression of certain failure. At each bell during the 
rest of the day my heart and head sank lower. I had 
thought Thursday was long enough but Saturday was a re- 
finement for that day's sufferings. 

No, I believe that I never again shall see one and three 
without shuddering. — M. S. '15. 



BY LAUGHING WATER 

The Indian never tires of his tales of the wild, mad 
beauty of the dashing waters, in the days when he was 
sovereign of wood and plain. He never fails to speak with 
reverence of the mysterious tales told him by the sparkling 
turmoil. Even yet, although the white man has bridled 
the falls to do his will, the Indian will travel many weary 
Page Bight 



The College Greetings 




miles just to. stand below and hear again of the free happy- 
life of the past. Even we, when standing on the little 
rustic bridge below, with our less simple natures, can in 
some small degree understand its call and song. The mist 
of dashing spray in our faces, and we are lost in quiet 
reverie. Watching the waters dance and whirl, then cast 
themselves over the ledge at our feet, we can almost hear 
the laugh of a girl, some mystic Minnie with a joyous 
ha-ha. Her shouting laughter changes to a smile, as the 
waters become quieter. Then we, too, can imagine the 
happy fate of some glad spirit, who, in a wonderful way, 
became the proud mistress of the "Falls of lyaughing 
Water."— A. P'h. 



BARGAIN HOUR 

One morning about half after eight as I was leisurely 
sauntering by the "Grand Leader," I noticed over the door 
a flaming placard — "All trimmings at half price from 9:00 
to 10:00 today. No goods on approval or credit." Seeing 
an anxious crowd assembled, I stepped in the store merely 
for a casual glance at the wonderful bargains. Fashionable 
women, shop girls, every conceivable class, were eagerly 
striving for a front place in the surging line. Almost in- 
voluntarily, I had entered the line and was swaying to and 
fro with the crowd. As the clock struck nine, the mad 
rush began. Hats were jostled to one side; skirts were 
jerked loose from their fastenings; women screamed frantic 
orders to the distracted salesmen. The dainty fabrics were 
ruthlessly snatched and torn. Several hands grasped the 
same piece and pulled frantically until, at a sign of ripping, 
it was dropped by all with one accord. Thus the struggle 
went on, until all the fabrics were soiled and crumpled. 
Everyone wanted something, no one wanted any certain 
piece. Then, as if suddenly realizing that the time was 
almost gone, everyone began to buy. Each woman grabbed 

Pag« Nine 





The C o 1 1 e g- e Greetings 



something and hastily extended the necessary change. 
Color or pattern were unthonght of. The salesmen now 
rushed helter and skelter, endeavoring to serve everyone at 
once. The clock struck ten; with a final sweep the tables 
were cleared and the crowd su ged out. The whole collec- 
tion of valuable trimmings worth J5ioo had been sold for 
the paltry sum of $150. — E. E. '14. 



WW 

WHERE NUTS WERE FEW 

The warm autumn sunshine smiled down upon four gay 
girls as the carriage rolled smoothly over the bard road. 
The driver asked as she pulled the horse down to a walk at 
the cross roads, "Now, Peggy, which way?" 

"Straight ahead to the next turn," directed Peggy. 

"You don't either, Nelle; turn here," and Edith empha- 
sized her remark by reaching over and yanking the rein. 

"Edith Blair, you know there isn't a nut down there, 
that is the road to the fern-hill. Better go my way, Nelle, 
or you won't find anything but rough " 

"Oh do be quiet, Peggy, you're all wrong — I know this 
is the way," affirmed Edith in a voice that would brook no 
contradiction. 

"Well," acknowledged Nelle, "I don't know anything 
about these roads, but I have a feeling that '" 

"My goodness, Nelle," sputtered the impatient Edith, 
"If you stop to analyze your feelings we never will get any 
place. I say this road," and Edith settled all dispute by 
giving the right line an emphatic pull. 

"Oh well, it really won't make much difference. We'll 
get to the same place in the end," said the complacent 
Helen. 

Peggy sniffed indignanly. "I don't doubt that we'll 
land somewhere, but we'll have a nice time doing it, and 
there won't be any nuts at the landing either." 

"Oh well, calm down, Peggy, you probably — oh — ouch 
PAt« T«n 




The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 



— well such roads," and Nelle's sentence was left unfinish- 
«d, interrupted as it was by a succession of very deep ruts 
and treacherous mud holes. "Well, goosie, drive out here 
at the side," advised Kdith. "Now, this is better^ mercy! 
don't hit all the stumps — back a little, whoa— now go on; 
don't screech so, Helen, you won't get killed." 

"Nelle, if you don't want this carriage smashed to pieces, 
you had better keep in the road, since you have chosen this 
one," sagely put in Peggy: 

"Then we'll be j-j-olted to death," gasped Helen, "how- 
ever, that would be preferable to being hung in a tree," 
she added, as a huge limb brushed their faces and raked 
the top of the carriage. 

On they zig-zagged, among the trees, crashing through 
underbrush and dodging stumps. Nelle was kept busy 
with the reins and the many directions the girls gave her. 
A sudden bump took their eyes from a distant log which 
they had each warned her not to hit. After the bump 
there was a scraping noise and a halt. "Well, Nelle," 
expostulated Peggy, '^couldn't you see that tree?" 

"Why couldn't you see it?" re':orted Nelle, backing old 
Fay and edging around the big oak. Then they stopped 
to look for any signs of nuts. If any were there they failed 
to see them, for suddenly gnats and bees began to swarm 
thickly about them. Helen grew frantic. "I'll be a sight 
for that party tonight, won't I?" she stormed as she threw 
a lap robe about her head and ran for the open. 

Peggy led the bewildered, disgusted horse back to the 
road, calmly asking: "Have you girls noticed any hickory 
nuts? I believe that was an oak tree that we drove into." 

"Oh, rub it in, Peggy,' blustered Edith, readjusting her 
cap, which was dangling over one eye. "Get in here; we 
haven't come to the place yet." So Peggy assisted Helen 
in and they jogged on around the turn in the road, where a 
big creek stretched itself across their path. The girls 
were speechless; not a bridge in sight! 

Page Blvren 




The College Greeting's 



"Mercyf" exclaimed Edith, then catching herself — "Oh, 
yes, I had forgotten about this stream, but there is a ford 
here. See that wagon?" she finished triumphantly. Sure 
enough, there was a wagon going up the road on the other 
side. It must have crossed; so, reassured, the girls urged 
much-enduring old Fay into the water. 

"See," exulted Edith, "this isn't half bad, not bad at— 
I — Oh, Horrors!" and she added her screams to those of 
the other three. With a sudden whirling and gurgling, 
the waters had rushed up to the carriage seats and Fay be • 
gan to swim for her life. Peggy recovered first, "Hold 
those reins up, Nelle," she commanded sharply. The cur- 
rent was swift, the river deep and distressingly near. 
Nelle and Edith, resting their feet on the dash-board, 
spoke words of encouragement to old Fay in shaky voices. 
Helen and Peggy, from their perches on the back of the 
rear seat, watched the water in fascinated horror. 

Suddenly a voice exclaimed: "Wal, I swan — findin' it 
perty wet, ain't ye? I could a tole ye it wuz deep." 

With a gasp the girls in front jerked their feet from the 
dashboard, only to replace them when they splashed into 
the water in the carriage. They looked across and there 
among the willows, with his fishing pole and pipe, stood a 
tall country boy. The girls deigned no reply. Their 
dignity, however, suffered a shock when they discovered 
the next moment that he, laughing at their predicament, 
was ambling on down the bank. Slowly but surely old 
Fay, upon whom all hopes of rescue depended, drew them 
out of the water, on to the dry, sandy road. 

Each stared silently at the others, all too thankful to be 
safe, to resent the amusement they had afforded. Then of 
one accord they began to describe their feelings when the 
carriage dropped down into the deep water. 

"I never thought we'd come out alive," vowed Helen. 

"I thought about swimming but decided I wouldn't until 
Page Twelre 



The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 




it was necessary," contributed Edith a little less 
energetically; while Nelle made clean confession that, '*I 
simply shut my eyes and trusted Fay." 

At last Peggy sweetly inquired: "How about the nuts, 
Edith?" 

"There weren't any back there, so they really must be 
farther on. I really do know where they are girls; they 
are — oh, well, what direction is that? North? I'm all 
turned around now so I can't tell where — never mind the 
old nuts, we've had enough excitement. Let's stop in 
these woods and eat our lunch." 

Peggy's nose went in the air with an "I told you so" ex- 
pression, while the others laughed at Edith's confession. 
But as all were hungry old Fay was tied to a sapling. 

Nelle reached for the lunch box. "Oh girls, look here," 
she moaned as she held up the limp box with streamlets 
running from each corner. Then the funny side of the 
whole affair seized her and sinking down on a stump she 
laughed so infectiously that after a moment's amazement 
the other girls joined her. Suddenly she made a dash for 
the carriage, looked under both seats, then exclaimed 
tragically, "Girls, where is the tin bucket and that new 
halter?" 

Blank faces met her incfcuiring look. Then light broke 
upon Helen. "Oh, I know, I saw them both floating off 
down the creek when we were about half across, but I 
never thought about mentioning it.'' 

Peggy arose from her seat on the ground. "Of course 
Edith would have dived after them if you had," she said 
sarcastically. Then she added as she picked some burrs 
from her skirt and replaced several hairpins, "This nutting 
expedition has turned out to be one grand surprise party. 
Now I move that we go home and end this agony. Is 
there a second?" 

"Miss President," murmured Edith meekly, "I second 
the motion." It was unanimously carried. — F. S. '15. 

Page Thirteen 




The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting-s 



Faculty Committeb — Miss Weaver, Miss Tanner, Miss Cowgill 
Editor — Janette C. Powell 

Associate Editoks — Louise GfateB, Helen Moore, Edith I^yles 
Business Manageks — Annette Rearick, Myrtle Walker, Marian 
I/Ombard. 

The *' Greetings" Board is happy to announce the open- 
ing of the "Greetings" office on the main floor of Harker 
Hall. More and more is the "Greetings" becoming a 
college paper, representative of the work done by the stu- 
dents, reflecting the college spirit and recording the events 
of college life. Its place among the school organizations 
is given further recognition by the opening of the Greet- 
ing office. This office will make it possible to conduct the 
business of editing the paper with more system and dis- 
patch. The students are cordially invited to come to the 
office to leave contributions, to receive their copies of the 
paper, to make suggestions or even to make a long deferred 
payment. 



In a recent issue of the "Classical Journal" there appear- 
ed an article calling attention to the metrical translation of 
Latin poets by students in advanced Latin courses. We 
are happy to state the Latin Department of I. W. C. has 
already adopted this comparatively new method with great 
success. We are glad, in this issue, to bring to the notice 
of the college at large several selections from Horace and 
Catullus recently translated by the students of the depart- 
ment. From these it will be seen that such translations not 
only do away with the "word for word" translation of a 
few years ago, but also stimulate interest in the literary 
value of the old classics by keeping their poetic form intact. 



Dr. Harker has been away from the College very often 
this month in the interest of the Educational Forward 
Movement. 
Pag« rourt«en 



The C o 1 1 e p- e Greetins's 



COLLEGE EVENTS M 



FACULTY RECITAL 

On the evening of Saturday, January 27, in the Music 
Hall, Director Max Swarthout, violinist, and Professor 
Donald Swarthout, pianist, of the College of Music, gave 
their initial recital before a discriminating and enthusiastic 
audience, which moreover was large enough to test the 
capacity of the hall. 

The program might be loosely termed an ensemble pro- 
gram, as both gentlemen appeared on each number, though 
strictly that term could only be applied to the first number, 
the Spanish Symphony of lyalo, a most exacting composi- 
tion consisting of five movements. It was rendered with 
great smoothness despite its many tricky rhythms and tech- 
nical difficulties. 

The second group, Bruch's G minor Concerto for violin, 
gave more ample opportunities for Director Swarthout to 
display his ability as a violinist. His rendition was intelli- 
gent, musicianly and thoroughly artistic. He never seemed 
to lose his poise. His climaxes were approached with sure- 
ness and completed with fine tonal breadth. Prof. Donald 
Swarthout presided at the piano. 

The third number was Rubinstein's Concerto in D minor, 
for piano, a composition originally ,played in Jacksonville, 
by the composer himself, at the old "Strawn Opera House. " 
In his really masterful handling of this number Prof. 
Swarthout demonstrated his right to the title of "artist", 
proved that such things as sweeping arpeggios, scales in 
octaves and thirds can be made expressive and eloquent. 
He was assisted by his brother, Director Swarthout, who 
rendered a transcription of the orchestral score upon the 
second piano. 

Page Fifteen 





The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 



Of both men it may be said that they have- perfect rhythm^ 
a thing much more rare than is usually supposed; their 
work is always fntelligently artistic, suflScientry tempera- 
mental, and thoroughly satisfying. The program is; 
appended. 

V101.IN AND Piano 

Spanish Symphony Lal& 

Allegro non troppo 
Scherzando (Allegro tuolto)^ 
Intern^zzo (Allegjretto non troppo) 
Andante 
Rondo (Allegro) 

ViOWK 

Concerto in G minor, Op. 26 , , , . Bruch 

Vorspiel (Allegro moderato) 

Adagio 

Finale (Allegro energico) 

Piano 

Concerto in D minor, Op. 70 . . Rubinstein 

Moderato sssai 

Andante 

Allegro 



THE DICKENS CENTENNIAL 

With the Dickens' atmosphere that our interest in his 
centennial has created, it seemed the most natural thing in 
the'°wofld to find ourselves talking freely with the old 
friends that this author has with his magic charm made 
ours. On February seventh the girls of the Expression 
Department brought to our minds more vividly than ever 
before some of our favorite characters. We heard, this 
me, Mr. Squeers engaging his assistant, we lived over 
again the talk of Lucie Manette and Mr. Carton, we felt tha 
pathos of his wasted possibilities more keenly then ever but 
felt the nobleness that was shown at his execution. We 
visited the School of Facts, we traced again the life of P»ul 

Pag« Sixt«ea 





The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 



Dombey, with a renewed tender pity for Florence. We 
laughed over the courting of Mrs. Corney and Mr. Bumble 
and cried over lyittle Joe. Peter Magnus' anxious prepara- 
tion for his proposal made us share his excited expectation 
4is he accepted his friend's advice. 

With these memories with us it did not seem the least 
unusual to find behind the teapots in Expression Hall, 
Mrs. Chick and I*ucie Manette, Betsy Trotwood, Mrs. 
Corney and dear old Pegotty, though we drank more from 
the good cheer in her wholesome face than from her tea. 
The Uriah Heep that we had imagined so often when we 
had stopped io our reading to be sure that his crafty smile 
wasn't lurking behind oar shoulders, now wiggled his way 
among us, satisfactorily rubbing his horny bands. David 
Copperfield was there with tender care for his child wife, 
Dora, who clung to him and cuddled her precious doggie. 
Barkis and the Micawbers still kept within David's sym- 
pathetic reach. Nicholas Nickleby and Barnaby Rudge 
talked to us in the most natural fashion and Mr. Dombey 
proudly led around the heir of Dombey and Son, while 
gentle little Florence followed meekly. Mr. Bumble, Pick- 
wick and Sam Weller chatted jovially in one corner, while 
Joe the Fat Boy fell off his chair sound asleep. With one 
accord we pay homage to the genius of Charles Dickens 
that has given to us this wealth of friends. 



WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY 

February 22nd is always one of the gala days at the 
Woman's College, and this year the "Father of his Country" 
received the usual honors. The dining room, with its 
walls and chandeliers gay with many flags, with its tables 
decorated with mimic forts and musket place-cards, sug* 
gested early chapters in our nation's history — chapters with 
pages illustrated by colonial characters in stiff brocades and 
powdered wigs. The chatter and the merriment during 

Page Seventeen 





The C o 1 1 € g" e Greetings 



dinner hour, however, disclosed the fact that these dig- 
nitaries were only happy college girls masked in the bor- 
rowed finery of long ago. But when the dinner ended, thej- 
again assumed the dignit)', also borrowed with the costumes 
and marched in stately procession to Music Hall. For a little 
time they talked and fluttered and admired as girls either 
of today or of yesterday are sure to do, and then settled 
themselves to enjoy some of the Expression girls in a 
charming colonial play: "Maids and Matrons." Each of 
its three acts with its movement and its sparkle was deserv- 
ing of much applause, and had it. Then the day was over 
and despite the afternoon holiday, lessons for the 23d peer- 
ed and whispered about the pillows and made restless 
dreamers of the merry revellers. 



CONVENTION AT MONMOUTH 

February the second, third and fourth, the second meet- 
ing of the Central Illinois Student Missionary Conference 
was held at Monmouth College. Nineteen schools were 
represented by eighty-six delegates, workers in Y. W. and 
Y. M. C. A.'s. 

The leaders were Miss Anna Brown of Wellesley, Dr. T. 
Dwight Sloan, both Traveling Secretaries of the Student 
Volunteer Movement, and O. E. Pence, Y. M. C. A. Sec- 
retary of the Colleges of Illinois. The needs of the foreign 
fields were presented by Miss Bertha Johnson of India, Dr. 
Hart of China, Dr. M. A. Clark of Brazil, and Professor 
Porter, formerly of India but now of Monmouth College. 

The conference was especially helpful because of its dis- 
cussion of live, up-to-date problems and of practical, work- 
able plans for meeting those questions. The theme of the 
first day was the means of promoting missionary intelli- 
gence in colleges. The second day was devoted to the 
Student Volunteer Movement, its meaning, its growth and 
its power. 

Illinois Woman's College was represented by Annette 
Rearick, Anna Shipley, Frances Frazee and Celia Cathcart. 

Page Eighteen 




MMHlMfMWMHIIiMiM 

The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 



THE SENIORS 

At the opening of the present semester, the girls in the 
special departments who are to have diplomas in June, re- 
ceived their classification as Seniors. Those in Music are: 
Myrtle Walker, Clarissa Garland, Stella Shuff, I^ena 
Hopper, Ruth Stimpson and Ruth Widenham; in Art: Pearl 
Schlosser; in Expression: Frances English, Sue Fox, 
Mayme Severns, Jeannette Taylor and Beryl Vickery; in 
Home Economics: Edna Allison, I^ucille Allison, Mayme 
Allison, Rhea Curdie, Ella Newman, Sidney Newcomb, 
Elsa Richter and Mary Watson. 

On February ninth Miss Cowgill entertained the Seniors 
at four- thirty in the afternoon, at an informal itea party, 
held in the alcove of the fourth floor of Harker Hall. The 
new Seniors were very cordially welcome into the class, 
plans for the year were discussed and everyone present had 
a delightful time. 

Ou the evening of February the fourteenth President and 
Mrs. Harker gave their annual dinner in honor of the 
Seniors. The Senior Dinner is known from year to year 
as one of the most delightful events of the college year. 
Marvelous tales of its joys are handed down by each Senior 
class to the one succeeding. This Valentine's evening was 
no exception to the rule. The six course dinner, perfect in 
every detail, was served at small tables appropriately deco- 
rated in hearts and lighted by red shaded candles. After 
ainner rivalry ran high to see who could guess the most 
answers to the Musical Romance, as it was read by Mrs. 
Harker and interpreted in snatches of old, familiar tunes 
by Mrs. Hartmann on the piano. Mrs. Harker presented 
the two successful tables with a large bunch [of red carna- 
tions. 

During the evening Mrs. Hartmann sang and Miss 
Kidder read. The Seniors of 1912 reluctantly said the 
good nights, and felt that this Senior Dinner was indeed an 
event worthy to be passed down into history. 

Pa^ Nhx«t«en 




The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 



Beside the Seniors, the guests were, Miss Weaver, Miss 
Cowgill, Senior Class Officer, Director and Mrs. Swarthout, 
Miss Knopf, Miss Kidder, Miss Gillett and Mrs. Hartmann. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

A Vesper Concert by the students Sunday afternoon, 
February i8th, was the first of a series of similar concerts 
to occur every few weeks during the remainder of the year. 
A very interesting though impressive program was given. 

The course in Ensemble music but recently offered by 
the College of Music is proving even more popular than 
was expected, three classes having been organized thus far 
while a fourth is practically assured. This work is under 
the personal supervision of the Director and the Associate 
Director and doubtless will continue to be one of the most 
popular courses offered to the students. The advanced 
class in Ensemble is at present working on an eight-hand, 
two- piano arrangement of Mendelssohn's A major (Italian) 
Symphony. 

In recognition of the large number of inquiries received 
from young women desirous of taking a Supervisors' Course 
in Public School Music, the College of Music has decided 
to add this course to its catalogue for next year. Though 
as yet it is too early to state definitely as to this line of 
work, the College can assure its patrons a thorough, com- 
prehensive course in this branch of musical education under 
capable and efficient instructors. 

Mr. Phillips will be heard in recital on the evening of 
March nth in Music Hall. This news will undoubtedly 
be most gratifying to all friends of the College who are in- 
terested in good music for, judging from Mr. Phillips' pro- 
grams and success in the past his coming recital will prove 
a delightful musical evening. 

Page Twenty 





The C o 1 1 e g" e Greet ing-s 



The Faelten class for primary instruction in piano re- 
cently organized is meeting with a very gratifying atten- 
dance, eleven children having taken up the work. The 
class is in charge of Miss Hay of the Faculty, who made a 
thorough study of this well known method a few years ago 
under the direction of Mr. Granberry, the present head of 
the Faelten School in New York City. 

President Harker and Director Swarthout made a trip to 
Urbana, 111., Friday, February 1 6th, to hear Clarence Eddy 
of Chicago in a recital on the new Austin organ in the 
Trinity M. E. Church of that city. 

Mrs. Hartmann has just received four autographed songs, 
compositions of her friend, the eminent American composer, 
Mr. Arthur Foote of Boston, Mass. 

Miss Knopf went to Chicago the first of February to 
attend a banquet and reception given at the Art Institute 
to the artists exhibiting at the annual exhibition of the 
Chicago Society of Artists, which is held from February i 
to 28 inclusive. Miss Knopf is fortunate in having three of 
her pictures shown. 

Miss Zilla Ranson had charge of the studio work during 
the absence of Miss Knopf. 

Special classes in Crafts and China Painting are being 
organized. 

On Monday evening, Feb. 12th, by request of the girls 
in the Department of Expression, Miss Kidder re-read 
"The Servant in the House" for the students and faculty. 
She had a very appreciative and delighted audience. 

The Jacksonville Woman's Club extended to the Ad- 
vanced Home Economics class an invitation to hear the lec- 
ture given on Saturday, February 10, by Miss Isabel Bevier 
from the [University of Illinois. The class unanimously 
responded to the invitation. 

Page Twenty-one 




1 h e C o 1 1 e g- e Greetiyig-s 



^^ 



The seniors in Home Economics are developing a course 
of study in cookery which shall correlate home life with the 
remainder of their school work. Practical aesthetic and 
educational values are being considered. 

The money which the second year Home Economic stu- 
dents earned before the holidays has been invested in 
much needed silver for the dining-room. 



CHAPEL NOTES 

Dr. Jo-Hannen, a man very prominent in Turkey be- 
cause of his work and his help in translating the Bible into 
the language of that countrp, visited the Woman's College 
Chapel. The girls were very much interested in hearing of 
this newly developed country, and the personal charm of 
Dr. Jo-Hannen made the chapel exercise very unusual. 

Seldom have we enjoyed a chapel talk more than we did 
Bishop Anderson's terse remarks January 26th. His theme 
seemed to be summed up in his opening words: "A mind 
to comprehend, a heart to warm, and a spirit to lighten the 
burdens of others. 

February seventh, Dicken's Birthday, will always be asso- 
ciated with the beautiful address which Dr. Morey gave in 
honor of that day. In a very concise way he sketched the 
wonderful power and capacity of Charles Dickens, illus- 
trating his statements with bits from his well known books, 
reviving the name which has brought so much joy and 
comfort into the world. 

"We have been having interesting talks in the old chapel 
too. On February fifth Miss Weaver told the girls about 
her visit to the Fresh Air Camp in Cleveland, Ohio, 
Page Twenty-two 





The C o 1 1 e §■ t Greeting's 



GREETINGS FROM CALIFORNIA 

The Los Angeles Branch of the Illinois Woman's College 
Association held a very pleasant meeting at the home of 
Mrs. Mary Lane, 2344 West Twentieth Street. There 
were present Mrs. Lane, Mrs. Anthony, Miss Sibert, Mrs. 
Elliott, Miss Ruth Elliott, Mrs. Hoblit, Mrs. Murray, Mrs. 
Alkire, Mrs. Homer Woods of Pomona and Miss Nina 
Veach of Redlands. Miss Emma Sibert, neice of Mrs. 
Lane, was a special guest. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and an inter- 
esting discussion followed concerning the object of the 
Society, the number of meetings to be held and other 
business. Mrs. Phoebe Kreider Murray sang two or three 
songs very delightfully and Miss Nina Veach gave a 
"Sketch of the College from 'The Bulletin'." The pro- 
gram closed with our College Song, which was written by 
Mrs. Murray. Tea was served, and many a college story 
was told over the teacups. 



LOCALS 

First Semester exams are over! 

Mrs. Burnham and little daughter of Mason City were 
guests of Pansy Burnham recently. 

Miss Rolfe, who was a member of the faculty two years 
ago, was visiting here recently. 

Isa MuUikin went to Petersburg for a week end. 

Mrs. Hartmann and Miss Miller attended the performance 
of "Tristan and Isolde" in St. Louis February third. 

Pas« Twent7-t3ir«« 



PACIFIC HOTEL 

H. Foulk J. B. Snell 
Proprietors 

Jacksonville, Illinois 



McDougalPs 

Photographs 

Represents 25 years experienc 

West state Street 



A theme had been read on "Study in the Library" in 
which snatches of an Algebra discussion had been 
chronicled. 

Miss T — : "Is there any criticism?" 

Marjorie T — : "I think there is too much mention 
made of Algebra." 

Part of the class smiled and the rest wondered why. 



"ROBERTS' for QUALITY" 

Is not a mere phrase. It is the foundation of our success 
and reputation and our aim for the future. 

ROBERTS BROTHERS 

HIGH GRADE GROCERY AND PHARMACY 

DEIvIVERY SERVICE PHONE 800 



v,s,T EHNIES' 



FOR 



FRESH HOME MADE CANDY 

Pure Ice Cream and Soda Water 

Fine Box Chocolates 

216 EAST STATE ST. 



SKIRT BOXES 
ROCKERS, SCREENS, DESKS ^ 
AND BED ROOM CURTAINS 

AT 

JOHNSON, HACKETT & GUTHRIE'S 



Music pupil to teacher: "Am I old enoug-h to take the 
yellow jaundice?" 

It was later learned that she meant "Yellow Jonquils." 

"What is a vacuum?" 

**A big", empty place where the Pope lives." 



F. E. Farrell E. E. Crabtree 

Established 1865 

F. G. FARRELL & CO. 

BANKERS 

Successors to First National Bank 

Jacksonville, 111. 



C. S. MARTIN 

Fine Pictures — Artistic Framing 
Frames and Ovals of all 

descriptions and sizes 

314 W. State St., Scott Block 

Jacksonville, 111. 




Frank Elliott, Pres. Wm. R. Routt, V.-Pres. 

C. A. Johnson, Vice-Pres. 

J. Weir Elliott, Cashier 

J. AUerton Palmer, Asst. Cashier 

ELLIOTT STATE BANK 

Jacksonville, 111. 
Capital $150,000 

Undivided Profits $ 12,000 

DIRECTORS 
Frank Elliott Frank R. Elliott 

J. Weir Elliott John A. Bellatti 

Wm. R. Routt C. A. Jobnaon 

Wm. S. Elliott 



F. J. WADDELL & CO. 

Suits, Coats, Costumes, Skirts, Waists, Corsets 

Muslin Underwear, Gloves, Hosiery 

Novelties and Newest Models 

Shown always at moderate prices 



CARNIVOROUS SHIPS 

"Aeneas brought back six deer to feed his ships." 

— Vergil Examination. 




We Repair Shoes 



THE NEW SHOE STORE 
For Dressy Footwear 

The classy new shoe store is offering a classy 
lot of shoe styles. 

We make an extra effort to supply the wants 
of College trade in their various shoe wants, 
street shoes, dress slippers, lounging slippers. 

HOPPERS 

Southeast Corner Sq. 




VERS 



Jacksonvilles Largest Mens' Store 

Pennants and Banners 

I. W. C. and Fraternity special designs 

Manish Cut Sweater Coats 

Hand Bags, Trunks 

and Suit Cases 



McCUIvLOUGH BROS. 

Professional 
Photographers 

Hockenhull Bldg. 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING 

for the latest in Suits, Ladies' Underwear, Ribbons, 

Laces, E^mbroidery Materials or Notions 

Visit the store that carries the 

up to date merchandise 

PHE:LPS & OSBORNE 


Art Student in Studio: "Dojyou mind if I tint my 
skin here?" She hastened to explain that she meant her 
Phi Nu skin. 


CHAS. M. hoppe:r 

Dentist 

2ii S. Side Square 


Brady Brothers 

Hardware, Cutlery 
Paints 


COOK 

LIGHT with GAS 

HEAT 

Jacksonville Railway & 
Light Company 

224 Soutli Main Street 


Fancy Toilets Christma* Goods 

COOVER & SHREVE'S 
Drug Store 

Kodaks and Supplies 

Developtng and Finishing 



Math is, Kamm & Shibe Say 

We can furnish your 

Shoes and Party Slippers 

in the popular styles 

leathers, and 

fabrics 



J. P. BROWN 

Sheet Music and Musical 
Merchandise 

Talking Machines and Supplies 

Mail Orders Solicited 

S. W. Cor. Square 



"What is a semikarns?" she asked, and her accent was 
on the second syllable. She held the poem where it could 
be seen, — and the word wrs semi-chorus. 



JOHN K. LONG 

Job Printing" 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 

Loose Leaf Note Books 

Illinois Phone 400 

no North West St. 



ALL KINDS OF FRESH and 

SALT MEATS, FISH, 

POULTRY, ETC. 

\ Both Phones 196 230 W. State St. 



Hillerby's 
Dry Goods Store 

Safest Place 
to Trade 



Ask your grocer for 

HOLSUM 

bre:ad 



Made clean. Delivered clean 
in waxed paper wrappers 



Dr. Albyn Lincoln Adams 

Oculist and Aurist to 

School for the Blind 

323 W. State St. 

Practice limited to diseases of 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 


Dr. R. R. BUCKTHORPE 
Dentist 

111. House 1054. 
Phones ■< Bell. Office 512. 
111. Office 750. 

Over Hatch Drug Store 

Jacksonville, 111. 


Miss N — was telling- of the excitement that ran hig-h 
among- the Mohammedans when the rumor was started 
that the foreig-ners were excavating under Omar's Tomb 
— for they thoug-ht the ark mig-ht be there. 

Miss S — : "Why, do they really think that Noah's ark 
is there?" 


DENNIS SCHRAM 

Jeweler 

Colleg-e Pins, Spoons, Ktc. 

South Side Square 
JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 


DR. CARL E. BLACK 

Office— 349 E. State St. 
Telephone, either line, No, 85. 

Residence— 1305 West State Street 

Telephone, either line. No. 285 
Surgery— Pasaavant Memorial Hospit- 
al and Our Savior's Hospital 
Hospital Hours — 9 a. m. to 12 m. 
Office Hours — 1:30 to 4 p. m. Even- 
ings and Sundays by appointment 


BARGAIN BOOK STORK 

West State Street 


EXPERIENGED HAIR DRESSER 

I am prepared to manufacture hair 
combings in the latest style. Sham- 
pooing and scalp massage done by ap- 
pointment at your residence. 

FLORENCE KIRK KING 

503 W. CollegejSt. 111. Phone 837 



E. W. BASSETT 

OOL-I-EC3E UENA/EL-FRX 

Copper and Brass Goods, Desk Clocks, Desk Sets, Chaf- 
ing' Dishes, Percolators, Alcohol Stoves, Kettles. 

COLLEGE AND SOCIETY STATIONERY 

SPECIAL SOCIETY ENGRAVING 

DONE TO ORDER 

Kodak Supplies Amateur Finishing 

21 South Side Square 



"Why do we broil meat?" asks a teacher in Home 
Economics. 

"Meat is made up of g"erms, and we cook the meat to 
kill the g-erms,'* came the answer. 



A BARGAIN 
IN STATIONERY 

78 Sheets of Linen Paper 
and 50 Envelopes to match 

all for 25c 

Armstrongs Drug Store 

The Quality Store 
Southwest Corner Square 



W A. PETERS 
TAILOR 

315 W. State St. 111. Phone 169 

Suits, Coats and Skirts 

made to order by expert tailors 

Cleaning", Pressing, Dying 

and alterations of all kinds 

Special rates to students 

Work called for and delivered promptly. 



H. J, & L. M. SMITH 
Fancy Bazaar and Millinery 

211 West state Street 



I DO 

Kodak Finishing 
Bromide enlarging 
Flashlights 
and Views 

CLAUDE B. VAIL 

Oswald's Drug Store, 71 E. Side Squar 

Residence Phone. 111. 1493 



The most dainty things in Ring's and Jewelry. New 

and handsome styles of goods in Sterling Siver. 

Highest grades of Cut Glass, and every ^description 

of Spectacles and Rye Glasses 

Fine Diamonds a Speciality 

at 

RUSSELL & LYON'S 

West Side Square 
Both Phones 96 



"Isn't that music too hard for me?" asked a maid of 
musical propensities. "I has so many black marks that 
connect the notes, and doesn't that make it harder?" 



E. A. SCHOKDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 E. State St. Jacksonville, 111. 
Illinois Telephone 388 



I^adies' High Grade, Late Style 
FUR SCARFS and MUFFS 

ARE SOLD BY 

Frank Byrns 

Most Reasonable Prices 



College Girls are invited to take 
advantage of the resources of this 
store for supplying their needs in 
the dry goods line. Dress Goods, 
Silks, Ribbons, Laces, Handker- 
chiefs, ets. are to be had here in 
attractive patterns at poplar prices. 




HocKCNHuu Bloc Jacksonvilic III. 



"A DELIGHTFUL RIDE" 

This will always be the cry 

if the rig" came from 

CHERRY'S 

Horses are fine travelers but 
gentle and safe. 

All equipage the finest 
Call either phone 

CHERRY'S LIVERY 



MONTGOME^RY & DKPPE'S 

Everything in Dry Goods — Well Lighted 
first floor cloak and suit room 

Agents for Ladies Home Jourual Patterns 
The new "Howd" front laced corsets 



"We Started off to our picnic on a bright and beautiful 
morning", taking" one small dog" and other provisions." 

— English Composition. 



SNERLY & TAYLOR 
Select Groceries 

221 West state Street 



GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 




Cloaks, Suits, Furb amoMiujmei^ 




jAGKSOMViLUt, tu.. 

Established 1890 

Low Prices, Square Dealing 
Keep us busy 



Illinois Phone 57 Bell Phone 9: 

Fresh Drugs, Fancy Goods, 

Stationery 

THE 
BADGER DRUG STORE 

2 doors West of Postoffice 
235 E. State Street. 




Andre & Andre 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS OF QUALITY 

When you think of Furnishing's for 

the Home or Office 

THINK OF US 

48-50 North Side Square 



STRANGE STATEMENTS 

"Coleridge died because he was an opium pheme." 

"The world was once thought to be a triangular 
sphere." 



The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital . . . $200,000 
Surplus . . . 20,000 

Deposits . . . 1,100,000 
U. S. Depository for Postal Savings Bank 
Julius E. Strawn, President 
Miller Weir, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear, H.J.Rog- 
ers, A- A. Curry, C. B. Graff 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



We make a specialty of catering- to I. W. C. students 
We also make nice Birthday Cakes with dates and ini- 
itials and delicious new Sundaes which college girls 
appreciate so much. 
Phone us your wants and we will deliver same to college 
Let us furnish you an estimate on your next class recep- 
tion or social function of any kind. 
We have both phones. No. 227 

VICKERY & MERRIGAN 
Caterers 527 West State St. 



pboto portraiture 
oxTO ©f=»ie:xh 

Successor to 
This Wataon Studio 

Southwest Corner Square 



"When you finish your report, you may put it under 
my door," remarked the teacher. 

Later the Jitudent wias seefci standing- before the 
teacher's door^ in evident distress, for the door was open, 
and what should she do with her report? 



We always have 

The Latest Novelties 

for Young" Women 

We have made our success by 

anticipating" 
Correct Styles for each season 

EVENING Slippers 
JAMBS McGINNIS & CO. 

62 EBst Side Square 



HARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO. 

Designs, Cut Flo^pvers 
Plants 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

Store: Pell Phone 154, 111. 182 

Greehouses, Bell 775 



Piepenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 
HERE TO PIvEASE 

Candies, Cakes. Cookies, Pie 

Sandwiches, Pop on Ice, 

Groceries^ 

California Fruits, 

School Supplies 



GIRLS: Come and visit m 
at my little Hat Shop. 
g"ive especial attention an< 
prices to college g"irls. 

DORA P. ROBINSON 

537 South Diamond Street 



^be College (Breettngs 

€(fThe College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 
€|Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month^ 

€jf Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies 15c. 
€|{Entered at Jacksonville PostoflSce as second class matter. 



Contents 

Editorial 3 

Mischief of the Forest 4 

The First Robin . . 7 

Some Dates Changed, Others Canceled 7 

The Porch Across the Street 8 

Moonlight and Shadows 10 

Its Origin 10 

Unfruitful Labors 11 

Discouraged 12 

The Spirit of the Plain 13 

As I See It 13 

Class Affairs 15 

Belles Lettres Play 17 

Shall They? 17 

Department Notes 18 

Y. W. C. A. Notes 19 

Alumnae Notes 21 

Illinois Woman's College Guild 22 

Exchanges 23 



lo U t T ill li fe 



3 C 



A gush oi bird song, a patter or 
dew, 
A cloud and a rainbow's 
warning, 
Suddenly sunshine and perfect 
blue— 
An April day in the morning. 



51 li==ill^^ [E 



^be CollCQC (greetings 

Vol. XV. Jacksonville, 111., April, 191 2 No. 6 

Faculty Committee — Miss Weaver, Miss Tanner, Miss Cowgill 
Editor — Janette C. Powell 

Associate Editobs — Louise Gates, Helen Moore, Edith Lyles 
Business Managebs — Annette Rearick, Myrtle Walker, Marian 
Lombard. 



Again and again we must be reminded of the respon- 
sibility we as students must feel for our college. Seldom, 
however, have we been more moved to rise to the best 
within ourselves than we were by the address recently 
given by Dr. Blaisdell of Pomona College. Full of en- 
thusiasm for the great cause for which he is working, he 
considers Education no musty inactive term; rather it 
stands for unselfish activity, an activity that expresses it- 
self in terms of steady growth for both the individual and 
the institution. To him, in just so great a degree as a 
school fits the student for Service has it fulfilled its obliga- 
tion; moreover, the student's obligations increase in corres- 
ponding degree. There is no better way of expressing this 
appreciation than by hearty co-operation in whatever may 
promote the growth of the school. In the end it is upon 
the student body that the manner and extent of develop- 
ment is largely depentdent. With the heritage of priceless 
ideals left by the students of former times, we of the pre- 
sent day have a double responsibility to meet. The pre- 
sent stands as a result of the work of the past. The re- 
marks of President Blaisdell were most timely, for with ad- 
vancement in standard, in attendance and equipment we 
might easily be content with present achievement. In our 

Page Three 





The C o 1 1 e g- 1 Greeting's 



pride we might easily become self-congratulatory and com- 
placent, but this would mean that we disregard our heritage 
from the past, together with the heritage we must give to 
the future. The less apparent need for student responsibility 
the greater the tendency to let things take their course. 
What we should face now, however, is the question of 
scholarship. The standard formed now will be the gage 
for the coming years. The matter of equipment and re- 
quirements must be met by those in authority, but there 
their work ends. They can only suggest and direct; upon 
the student himself is the quality of work dependent. The 
question of scholarship is no trivial one and in these days 
of increased interest in college graduates, criticisms, just 
and unjust, are heard on every hand. Many of these 
criticisms are based, not upon statements of college presi- 
dents, but upon inferences drawn from observation of col- 
lege students. This makes the student's position one of 
trust; his demands will mark his degree of interest in his 
college's welfare, his achievements will show the true 
value of these demands and as he is judged the school will 
be judged. Working together, then for the greatest good 
possible is the present duty of those students who would be 
the Builders of tomorrow. 



MISCHIEF OF THE FOREST 

"Mischief," said the Queen of the fairies, as she eyed 
this small, self important little fellow, with very evident 
disapproval, "what am I to do with you? You live up to 
3''our name only too well. Tell me about yesterday. I've 
heard various bad reports." 

Mischief, as he thought of yesterday, and all its fun, 
especially Freddy Smith's predicament, chuckled aloud. 
His little nose looked like a button when he laughed. The 
eyes you couldn't see at all and the mouth was always a 
vast grin. 

Page Four 



The C o 1 1 e §" e Greeting's 



It was long ago that this all took place and very far 
away. It was in the heart of an old forest, just how old 
no one but the fairies knew. Everything there was bright 
and cheerful. The fairies that lived there were devoted to 
their queen. 

With none had the Queen so much trouble as with 
Mischief, the little son of the beautiful Mirth and funny 
old Prank. She often labored with Mischief, the funny 
little fellow, and very often scolded him, for he was alto- 
gether too energetic and active. Her sage counsel seem- 
ed in vain, for just as of old, whenever Mischief, in 
walking along the street, saw a small boy who had an idle 
brain, straight to him he went and filled this small boy's 
mind with many an ingenious plan. Five minutes later 
he would laugh as the old Dutchman's apples were tipped 
over or as some poor kitty ran down the street followed by 
some energetic youngster. 

Mirth, who was loved dearly by her small son, scolded 
and pleaded with him by the hour. Many a time she suc- 
ceeded in toning him down, when along would come 
Prank, the very idol of Mischief's life, and all Mirth's ad- 
vice was scattered to the four winds. 

"If you were a mortal, how should you like to be bother- 
ed by bad, bad fairies? Where do you get your naughty 
ideas. Mischief?" she would plead. 

"Like father, like son," quoth the sagacious Mischief. 

The Queen strove to hide the smile lurking behind her 
lips, but Mischief saw it there and knew the Queen couldn't 
be very angry. So he kept up his witty remarks much to 
his own enjoyment. At the end of this interview, the 
Queen knew something must be done and done soon to 
keep Mischief in bounds. 

Gathering around her the four wise fairies of the forest, 
she told them of her troubles, and asked their advice and 
help. All night they pondered. Finally they decided 
that Peace must accompany Mischief in his travels here- 

Page FIT* 




The C o 1 1 e g- 1 Greeting's 



after. Mischief, when he heard of this plan, was pleased, 
and gladly as the sun rose next morning he started, accom- 
panied by the beautiful Peace, to begin his work. 

Accompanied by Peace he stole into the bedroom of 
Freddy Smith, a regular victim, and whispering to the 
little boy, who was just wakening, he told him it was late, 
and time for Grace to arise. Then, for no explanations 
did Freddy need. Mischief told him where the cold water 
was. A certain deed was soon done, and if Peace had not 
spoken to Grace, dire consequences might have followed. 

Mischief grinned, as he went down the street. Peace 
was an addition — she smoothed things over so well and left 
him with a good conscience, for Mischief did not like 
really to hurt anyone. 

At sunset, the Queen looked and understood, as a happy 
Mischief and a tired Peace stood before her. 

That the wise ones pondered as all Fairyland slept. 

It was in vain that Mirth pleaded for her son. The 
Queen was firm in her resolve. Prank for once said noth- 
ing. Next morning when the Queen told Mischief that for 
one month he was to be a mortal in the world, without 
fairy powers, he forgot to smile. All the other fairies look- 
ed scared. Then all was quiet. 

For nearly a month it has been sad and lonely in the old 
forest. Mischief is missed. All during Mischief's stay in 
the world as a mortal, by the Queen's request, Frolic, Mis- 
chief's small brother, took Mischief's work in hand. Sure- 
ly he did Mischief credit. He did not for an instant neg- 
lect Freddy Smith; in fact Freddy suffered more than when 
Mischief attended to him. Though he would go to the ex- 
treme, the Queen knew that at one word from her he would 
subside. 

Every day came tales about Mischief. He was always 
in trouble and invariably suffered the humiliation of being 
spanked by the old banana vender that had found him, 
coming from where no one knew. 

Page Six 



The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 



The month passed. A wee boy stood in the center of an 
old forest, led there, perhaps, by some fairies. All of a 
sudden he jumped — yes, surely here he was Mischief once 
more. Hugging himself he danced hither and thither. 
The whole band was happy. The Queen smiled and won- 
dered as she smiled how she had ever resisted those im- 
pulses to call him back, but, yes she was glad now that 
she had continued firm, though in undisguised joy she was 
calling him to receive her welcome. — I. C. '15. 



THE FIRST ROBIN 

The sun, magically wiping away the last traces of the 
winter's snow, left the earth soft, mellow and fragrant. 
Green patches of grass, here and there, looked up in sur- 
prise after the sudden removal of their blanket. The 
pussywillows leaned over the swollen brook, which rushed 
along in the gladness of its new freedom. Now and then, 
it whirled a block of remaining ice along or resentfully 
threw it out upon the shore. The trees had lost their 
sleepy lifelessness, the return of spring could be seen in 
their gently swaying branches. A robin flew to an old 
stump, turned his birdlike eyes from side to side, cocked 
his impudent head, listening attentively for some clue to 
his evening meal. He flufied his feathers out until he be- 
came a small living ball, then straightened himself up, 
swelled his tiny throat to give out his bit of spring in the 
cheerful chant, "Spring is here, and so am I." — A. P. '14. 



SOME DATES CHANGED; OTHERS 
CANCELED 

Yes, the exams, are to be January thirtieth, thirty-first, 
and February first," I joyfully answered as I scanned the 
I. W. C. catalogue. Jack had just asked me to go to the 
Sophomore Cotillion, February second. Now, there was 

Pag« 8«T«« 



The C o 1 1 e g" e Greetings 




nothing to prevent my coming home for it. In fact, it was 
the very best time in the whole year for me, since the 
exams, would all be over and I had just one class on Fri- 
day. What if I did miss all day Saturday? I might never 
have the chance to go again. 

January ninth, I left for Jacksonville, happy at the 
thought of being home again so soon, in spite of the fact 
that my father had expressed his ideas of such foolishness. 
The first week or so passed quickly but each day nearer 
the time seemed weeks long. I was living in the clouds 
then, so I didn't hear the first of Miss Derrough's sentence 
at dinner Tuesday evening. Could it be that she was talk- 
ing about the dreaded finals? Yes, they would probably be 
postponed for a week. I tried to console myself with the 
thought that maybe it was a false alarm, for I knew of no 
faculty meeting to make any such arrangements. The 
time, however, soon became the general topic of conversa- 
tion, so I had to know. 

The Dean's cheerful answer sealed my fate. The exams, 
were now dated for February first, second and third. The 
very thought of them staring me in the face had the same 
effect as the red quarantine card on my chum's door last 
•ummer. Everything appeared black except the new pink 
party dress that smiled at my misery and flaunted itself be- 
fore my eyes. 

How could I break that date and leave Jack without a 
partner, so near the time? He could probably get Grace, 
for she would go even if he asked her just an hour befor*. 
Grace or no Grace, it was settled that I could not go. The 
letter was written; and with visions of her good time and 
my busy Saturday, I half-heartedly began to translate 
I^atin. — M. L. '15. 



THE PORCH ACROSS THE STREET 

It was one of the few joys of Miss Belinda's sunless ex- 
Pas* Bisbt 



The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 



istence. In her invalid chair at the north window of her 
cottage, she looked out upon a broad sweep of lawn and a 
rambling, old-fashioned white house with green blind* and 
low, white-pillared veranda. With the inevitable knitting 
in hand, the sweet faced little spinster sat watching day by 
day, finding a fascination and charm in the activities of the 
genuinely American family whose home it was. In sum- 
mer, when the porch blossomed with troops of girls in 
pinks and blues. Miss Belinda could scarcely be persuaded 
to leave her vantage point. Early in the morning while 
the maid was sweeping the veranda and shaking out the 
rugs, she speculated on what the girls would wear that 
afternoon or whether there would be sweet peas or nas- 
turtiums in the bowl on the bamboo table. There was al- 
ways one or the other and sometimes a glowing bunch of 
hothouse roses. Miss Belinda liked the simpler flowers 
better for they reminded her of the fresh-faced girls them- 
selves. While the sun was beating its torrid rays on the 
roof, the green shutters upstairs were closed and there was 
no sign of life anywhere but when the shadows began to 
lengthen on the grass, the long glass door opened and three 
trim figures, in the daintiest of pink dimities and flowered 
organdies, tripped out. Miss Belinda watched with shining 
eyes as they flitted about, now arranging with deft touches 
the freshly gathered flowers, now stretching on tiptoe to 
twine a green tendril of the vine in and out of the wire. 
There were always callers, young girls with daintily tilted 
parasols and the hum of their conversation, with now and 
then a ripple of girlish laughter, reached Miss Belinda in 
her white-curtained window. She could hear the ice tinkle 
in the glasses as the tea was poured out and saw with 
regret the last white-clad figure take leave and the girls, 
arm in arm, go in to dinner. In the evening tall, athletic 
young men in white flannel suits took possession of the 
porch swings in the cool of the vine shadows. Then it was 
that Miss Belinda was most happy. Then she heard the 

Page Nine 




The C o 1 1 e g" e Greetings 



songs of her own girlhood — songs that stirred her with 
rivid memories of the past. — F. R. '14. 



MOONLIGHT AND SHADOWS 

Far below us, spread out in the bluish rays of the cold 
moon and the colder glistening stars, lay the town. The 
tall church spire reached far out into the night, the slate 
roof glowing dully in the full rays and softening into a 
mellow gray in the shadows hiding behind the spire. Far 
in the distance the dusky hills closed in around the town, 
protecting it in their embrace. On them the moonlight 
waned as it fell upon an open slope or tried to reach into 
the soft, purple shadows. A gigantic pine, towering above 
the others, stood, like one of its cones, in strong relief upon 
the darker shadows of the hills and the star-studded 
horizon. 

Gradually the hills began to melt away in the darkness; 
the cone of the tree faded into a dim outline like the ghost 
of something that is gone; the church spire melted into a 
thin shaft of pale light. A cloud had passed over the 
moon. — E. ly. '15. 



ITS ORIGIN 

A door opened; a head pushed itself out, then a kimoned 
creature stole quietly down the corridor. A moment, then 
another followed. The first one stopped until she heard 
the whispered pass word; in silence they crept down the 
back stairs. The objects, though common enough in the 
day time, startled them; from every nook and corner they 
expected something to jump at them. In breathless ner- 
vousness they arrived in a tiny room to find a circle of dark, 
sleepy objects there before them. So alike were all in the 
darkness that one scarcely knew who was huddled against 
her. Finally one arose and in tense whispers began to tell 

Page Ten 



The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 



of the object of their meeting. Frequently she stopped to 
listen to those mysterious noises of the night. Next each 
candidate was sworn a member and took the oath of alle- 
giance. For this was the first meeting of the Secret Order 
of the Sisters of Truth. When all was over, each girl went 
creeping back to her room, noisy in her efforts to be so 
very still. 

The moon looked into the tiny, deserted room and almost 
winked his eye; but then, the moon never tells anything. 

—A. P. '14. 



UNFRUITFUL LABORS 

The bell for nine o'clock boomed forth. It was only 
one bell, but no less than fifty doors banged in response. 

I^ouise, whose door had not banged, strove to shut away 
the laughter and gay voices, and the tempting odor of the 
popcorn mingled with the delicious fragrance of fudge com- 
in to her from the hall; for Henry VIII was demanding 
her attention and when Royalty summoned she dared not 
deny an audience. 

She had spent scarcely four minutes in the Kingly pre- 
sence when a knock came at her door. There were two 
visitors; one wished to know if she had any sugar; the 
other was anxiously inquiring for corn starch. Prompt re- 
plies in the negative caused their hasty departure. 

A minute more elapsed and Anne came to borrow a long 
spoon. In the scramble to find it before the fudge should 
boil over, I^ouise's mind had wandered far from England 
and its Kings. Going to the door with Anne she caught a 
glimpse of a crowd of girls in their gay kimonas, watching 
with much interest some attraction farther down the cor- 
ridor. Curiosity overcame duty and she ventured forth in 
time to see a solemn cavalcade of sheet clad figures bearing 
another sheeted figure, four or five feet in length, into a 
room across the hall. The shouts of merriment that greet- 

Pa<g« BI«Tea 




The C o 1 1 e g" t Greeting's 



ed the procession were irresistable and Louise became a 
member of the happy crowd. 

A glance at one of the girls carrying away a bowl of 
freshly popped com from the gas stove at the end of the 
corridor was enough. With a quick resolve Louise got her 
own materials together and rushed to get her corn popped 
before the 9:15 should ring. The salt was all ready, the 
butter melted but the corn had never been so slow before. 
Slowly, indifferently the little kernels would burst. When 
her patience had almost reached the vanishing point the 
harsh bell pealed forth. In spite of its warning notes, she 
was delaying, hoping for better results from the corn, when 
she saw approaching a familiar figure. Therefore she 
promptly decided to flee to her room with the half-popped 
corn. 

The crowds of girls had vanished; the last door slammed 
just as the 9:17 had sounded through the building. — M. L. 



DISCOURAGED 

Massive columns and overhanging arches gave to the 
church an air of enormous strength. At the great oaken 
door, two tiny shoulders were exerting their utmost strength 
to swing it inward. The little figure, clad in his Sunday 
best, with boyish pride in the new blue Jersey, turned now 
and then to give a pleading glance to the passers-by. 
Bracing his fore-arms against the heavy panels, he lowered 
his head and pushed with all his might; but the great door 
yielded not an inch. He turned and seated himself on the 
top step, his drooping little figure expressing all he felt. 
The tiny mouth had dropped at the corners and the lips 
were trembling. In the blue eyes two tears threatened to 
roll down the chubby cheeks. 

"Don't cry. I'll open the door for you," I ventured as 
I watched him. 

The two tears overflowed, but he stra'ghtened the stocky 
little form to answer. 

Page Twelve 





The C o 1 1 e §■ e Greeting's 



"It's no use. I bet Johnny my new nickel I could go 
to Sun'ay-school 'thout anybody's help, 'an now I've lost 
it. I guess I'll just go home an' let him bring me back," 
and as he disappeared around the corner, I saw him fumbl- 
ing in his pockets for the lost nickel. — H. K. '15. 



THE SPIRIT OF THE PLAIN 

Tom stood in the door of his shack, his thumbs thrust 
through the straps of his suspenders, his sock clad feet flat 
on the rough stone sill. The soft moonlight gave a silver 
tint to the thick hair, pushed carelessly back from the care- 
worn brow. 

Before him stretched the rolling prairie shrouded in 
mellow moonlight, broken here and there by dark patches 
where lay peaceful, sleeping cattle. There was not even a 
tree to cast a shadow. Above him were a thousand 
twinkling stars, — each one, he thought, sparkled with 
mirth at his solitude. From out of the depths of quiet and 
space came the howl of a lone wolf, its plea answered only 
by a faint echo, which died slowly away into the stillness. 
In the distance where the sky met the grey prairie Tom 
could see one small, bright light, which stood out as the 
only evidence of the existence of a second person on this 
vast undisturbed plain. Tom thought of his own little oil 
light, the expression within of the vast lonliness without, 
and turning, closed the door, which could not shut out the 
spirit of the plain. — B. R. '14. 



AS I SEE IT 

To prevent false impressions, let me tell you at the be- 
ginning that I am the picture of a very pretty girl on the 
back of a popular monthly which occupies a prominent 
place in the magazine rack of the college library. One 
who has never enjoyed the experience can have no idea of 

PaceThirtMii 





The C o 1 1 e g" t Greeting's 



the interesting people and things I see from this vantage 
point. Just now, for instance, at one table sits a carelessly 
dressed girl, who has evidently spent but little time or 
thought before a mirror. She is not old, but the clothes she 
wears are those suited to a woman twice her age. The 
arrangement of her hair is a cross between a Psyche and a 
figure-eight, with a wealth of scolding locks in the back 
which ought to be hidden under a neat barrette. The very 
sight of her makes me nervously rustle my pages in a vain 
attempt to attract her attention to me and to my sugges- 
tions as to "When the Hair is First Done up." 

Dorothy Gray, whose handkerchief, invariably on the 
floor, fairly screams out her name printed across the corner 
in indelible ink, attracts my attention, as she always does. 
I imagine she is what the authors of my various college 
articles term a "grind." The deep furrows across her fore- 
head and the quick start she gives when her neighbor 
drops a pencil show me that she should be enjoying a funny 
story now instead of poring over that dusty "English 
Iviterature. ' ' 

If the librarian doesn't say something to those girls over 
there in the corner, I shall be surprised. They are worry- 
ing poor Dorothy to distraction with their giggling and 
whispering. That all goes to prove, just as J. E. S. 
Simons, D. D., says, that college is not the place for some 
girls. There goes that dictionary to the floor with a bang. 
What a little mischief-maker Polly Terry is, to put it 
where she knew her sister's elbow would knock it off! If 
more mothers would read how to train their children while 
they are still little, I wouldn't have to witness such sights. 

Here comes the pretty Sophomore. I wish she would 
look at me a while. I'm sure that I am attractive in my 
new cover and with all my interesting stories. What does 
she want with the "Delineator"? See the horrid thing 
look up at me with that superior smile! My fashions are 
much more up-to-date, if there aren't so many of them. 

Page Fourteen 



The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 




Why, it's still showing peasant sleeves, and everyone knows 
that they've had their day. 

That young prep never conies in here without slamming 
the door. Of course, she must see the pictures on the 
screen before she can do anything else. Duty-bound she 
is, on her way to the science shelves, to inquire in a none 
too subdued whisper, what each person is doing and how 
"she's making it." She reminds me of Billie Bounce, 
about whom there is a story on my children's page. Before 
she sits down the bell rings. Everyone collects her books, 
pencils and pads, and rushes from the room. 

With a patient smile, the "Absolute Silence" sign looks 
over at me, "I shall be observed now, at least until after 
chapel."— C.S. C. '15. 



COLLEGE EVENTS 

CLASS AFFAIRS 

On Saturday night, March i6th, the Senior class gave 
one of the most delightful parties of the school year in 
honor of the Juniors. The Phi Nu and Belles Lettres 
halls were beautifully decorated in green, in keeping with 
St. Patrick's Day, and the orchestra, hidden behind a bank 
of ferns, furnished music the entire evening. 

As the guests arrived they were received by Miss Cowgill, 
Senior class ofl&cer; Miss Neville, Junior class officer; Miss 
Rearick, Senior president, and Miss Fouche, Junior pre- 
sident. 

About nine o'clock attractive hand-painted programs 
were handed to all, and this began the progressive conver- 
sation which furnished the entertainment for the evening, 
and also gave each guest an opportunity to meet all the 
others, a number of whom were out-of-town guests. The 
favors were "Erin-go-bragh" flags and shamrocks. 

Page Fifteen 



immm ftmmn Ba 

The C o 1 1 e g" e Greetings 



About 10:30 a delicious luncheon was served in the rooms 
below, and soon after the guests took their departure. 

The Juniors feel that the trials and tribulations of the 
Freshman and Sophomore years have now been rewarded, 
and they are hoping that in 1913 they may be as charming 
hostesses as the girls of 1912. 

^W 
Miss Neville entertained the Juniors at a six o'clock din- 
ner, Monday evening, February 26th. The other guests 
were Miss Weaver and Miss Anderson. It seemed that 
night that a holiday spirit had been thrown over every- 
thing — even the flowers and candles seemed to share in the 
contagion, and the only regret possible was that the even- 
ing had to come to so early an end. 



The Sophomores had a most pleasant hour when a course 
luncheon was served at the Peacock Inn on Monday, 
March 4th. Covers were laid for ten, and pink and white 
were the colors. 

A garden fete in March? Yes, and all the flowers of 
"summer, or April or May" were there. Never would you 
have suspected that such dainty, airy beings were of that 
dignified, studious company — the Seniors. On March the 
twentieth, eight the hour, in petals crisp and gay they came 
to brighten Dean Weaver's garden. Busy little bodies 
they were, chattering and laughing, thinking of the "very 
best wish" seed to plant in their garden — I. W. C. And 
when the precious seeds^'were planted, so good were they 
and well tended that they quickly blossomed into flowers, 
promises of hopes fulfilled. 

Never did a garden give more pleasure than this one of 
Miss Weaver's, never did flowers leave their home more 
reluctantly, but the gales of March warned them .that a 
Page Sixteen 




The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 



^^ 



garden of summer cannot flourish long in the uncertainty 
of storms and winds of early spring. 



BELLES LETTRES PLAY 

The Belles I^ettres play, Ibsen's "Doll's House," was 
given in Music Hall. Monday evening, March the twenty- 
fifth, under the eflScient direction of Miss Kidder, the head 
of the Expression Department. The cast was chosen as 
follows: 

ForwaldfHelmer Mary Ebert 

Nora Helmer Janette Powell 

Dr. Rank Jeanette Taylor 

Nils Krogstadt Mona Summers 

Mrs. Linden Letta Irwin 

Anna Ima Berryman 

Ellen . Adelaide Wright 

The play is the most difficult both in interpretation and 
presentation that Belles I^ettres has given recently, but 
they handled it well. The interpretation of the different 
parts was very good, showing sympathetic work and care- 
ful study. The society is glad to acknowledge its indebt- 
edness to Miss Tanner for her talk with the cast on the 
characterization and plot of the play. 

SHALL THEY? 

The charge that college students are "shut-ins", greatly 
in danger of becoming too narrow to see the world ^in its 
right perspective, has been refuted recently in the Woman's 
College. Dr Harker casually mentioned in chapel one 
morning that he had noticed where one college had taken 
a "straw vote" on the Presidential election, and another 
one on the woman's suffrage question, and he wondered 
what the result would be if such a thing were done here. 
The flame was kindled. To some it became a beacon light 

Page Serenieen 





The C o 1 1 e g- e Greetings 



of freedom and progress; to others a brand to consume 
inherited ideals of woman's high place and function. Dis- 
cussion met us in dining room, corridor and class. 

Very soon it was seen that a little more knowledge on the 
subject would be necessary, if the discussion were to pro- 
ceed. The first attempt to discover the principle of the 
question resulted in a debate by the second Academy Eng- 
lish class, where the anti's won. After more careful and 
efficient preparation the third Academy debate reversed 
the decision. With the impetus given by these younger 
members it is obligatory for us to carry on the investigation 
before we can determine the position of the College. Our 
interest proves at least that our horizon is not limited by 
our walls. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

The contract for the new organ for Music Hall has been 
let, and work has already begun upon the instrument at 
the factory. The organ, a two-manual instrument with 
tubular-pneumatic action, will be of the celebrated Austin 
make built at Hartford, Connecticut. It will be thoroughly 
modern in every respect and without doubt will prove a 
great factor in building up the department as well as a help 
in the musical features of the college life. The work of in- 
stalling the instrument in Music Hall will be commenced 
immediately upon the close of school in June and the organ 
will be ready for the opening of the college next September. 

Owing to illness, Mr. Phillips was obliged to postpone 
his recital scheduled for March 1 1 until later in the month. 

An especially noteworthy addition to the advantages 
already enjoyed by the students is the College Lyceum 
Course, the announcement of which will appear in the next 
catalogue. 

Pa«e Blgbteen 



The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 




Mr. Phillips will sing in Recital at Bloomington, Illinois, 
on the evening of March thirtieth. 

The enrollment in the College of Music continues to 
increase. 

Winifred Sparks, a graduate of the Art Department in 
the class of 1910, has had to resign her position as super- 
visor of drawing in the Public Schools of lyincoln, Illinois, 
because of illness. 

There is a strong probability that Mr. A. T. Van Laer of 
New York City will deliver a number of lectures on Art 
subjects late in April. Mr. Van Laer in on the lecture 
course of the Chicago Art Institute. 

Miss Kidder recently read the "Servant in the House" 
for the Eastern Star at Barry. On March 26th she read 
several selections at the Christian Church, and on March 
30th she went to Carrollton, where she assisted at an en- 
tertainment given for the benefit of the Carrollton Metho- 
dist ChuJch. 

The Home Economics College Specials have elected the 
following class officers: 

President — Anna Heist. 
Vice-President — Ruth Taylor. 
Sec. -Treas.— Ella Blake. 



Y. W. C. A. NOTES 

The annual election of officers for the coming year was 
held- March fifth. The officers elected were: 

President Helen Moore 

Vice-President ....... Anna Shipley 

Secretary Elizabeth Dunbar 

Treasurer Jesse Campbell 

"Coming events cast their shadows before" may be said 
of a certain mysterious event which is to come in the near 
future. 

P&f« Nineteen 



The C o I I e sr e G r e e t i n g- s 



b 




THE COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Feb. 23. Mr. Phillips' talk in chapel about our Patriot- 
ism and our National Song, "Th? Star Spangled Banner" 
was greeted with great applause. 

Feb. 24. Dr. Blaisdell, President of Pomona College, 
Cloremont, California, was a guest at morning chapel. 

Ilis few remarks aroused the loyalty of every girl present. 

Feb. 25. Mrs. I<ucy Rider Meyer was in Jacksonville 
and spoke at Brooklyn church Sunday afternoon. 

Feb. 26. Miss Neville, The Junior Class Officer, enter- 
tained the class of '13 at a six o'clock dinner. 

Feb. 27. The new College Song Books were used after 
evening chapel. 

Feb. 28. Miss Gillett talked before the Science and 
Mathematics Club which met at the College. 

Feb, 29. The nominations for Ma}^ Queen, \yere made 
by the Presidents of the six College classes. 

March i. Mr. William P. Phillips gave an interesting 
talk on the United States Army to the class in American 
Government. 

March 3. Special music at Central Christian Church. 
Director and Professor Swarthout, Mr. Phillips, Miss Miller 
and Mrs. Anne Young Jenkinson, '04, assisted. 

March 4. Sophomore supper at Peacock Inn. 
Francis G. Blair, State Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, was guest of the College. 

March 5. Y, W. C. A. elected officers for following 
year. 

March 6. May Queen election was held. Miss Jesse 
Campbell was elected Queen. 

March 7. The Athletic Association elected officers for 
the coming year. 

Page Twenty 



Ike C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting-s 



March 9. Miss Gates entertained the College Belles 
Lettres Society. 

March 10. Miss Horton, head of Deaconess Training 
School in St. lyouis, was a guest of the College and talked 
in morning chapel. 

March 11. A few of the "Militant vSuffragettes" had a 
breakfast at Peacock Inn. 

March 12. Misses Neville, Jennie Anderson and Carter 
attended the Ninth Annual Religious Education Associa- 
tion, which met in St. Louis. 

March 16. Miss Jennie Anderson talked in morning 
chapel on the Initiative and Referendum. 
Senior- fmiior Receptio7i. 

March 17. Misses Jennie Anderson and Carter gave 
very interesting reports in chapel of some of the lectures 
which weae given at the Religious Education Association. 

March 19. Dr. Harker announced in chapel that a 
"straw vote" would be taken Wednesday on the much 
agitated question, "Woman's Suffrage." 

March 20. The straw vote was taken directly after 

chapel, the Suffragists having a majority of twenty-nine 

votes. 

Miss Weaver entertained the Seniors. 

March 21. The music lovers had a rare treat in hearing 
Mr, Phillips in recital. 



ALUMNAE NOTES 

The Editors of the ^College Greetings received a letter 
from Mrs. Ella L,owe Alvis, from Citronelle, Alabama, tell- 
ing of a chance meeting of four Alumnae of the Woman's 
College: Miss Mary Pegram of Lincoln, Illinois, '64; Mrs. 
Ellen Harmon Carpenter, '66, Iowa City, Iowa; Mrs. Alvis, 
'66, of Kewanee, and Miss Nettie DeMotte Brown, '71. 

Page Twenty-one 




The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 



Miss Brown resides in Citronelle, but the others are there 
for health and pleasure. Mrs. I^aura Davenport Sayre of 
Springfield, Illinois, who was a student in the College in 
'67 and '68, is also spending the month there. Mrs. Alvis 
says: "We are having good times recalling school days, 
and telling one another of our children and even of our 
grandchildren." 

The general secretary of the Alumnae Association, Mrs. 
Belle Short Lambert, has in recent little journeyings re- 
ceived most cordial hospitality in meeting with Alumnae 
and former students of the College. 

In Hillsboro she met Anne White, '04, just returned 
from a year of study in Oxford, England, and Mrs. Sarah 
Sawyer, daughter of the late Judge Brewer, who with her 
sister attended college in the early sixties. 

In Springfield were Miss Sue Cheney, Mrs. B. M. 
Grifl&th, Mrs. Samantha White Watson and Miss Jane Car- 
penter, who were students in long ago years. Mrs. Richard 
Yates, Mrs. Georgia McBratney Underwood, Mrs. Linda 
Layton Trapp, Mrs. Hattie Thompson Lortou, Mrs. Louise 
Boley Jess and others of more recent years. 

At a Y. M. C. A. dinner in Pana a number of ladies, 
daughters of the college, sat w^ithin "speaking distance". 
Among them were Mrs. Eva Thompson Corson, wife of the 
pastor of the Methodist Church, Mrs. Emma Simpson 
Seiler, Miss Nellie Reece, '00, and her sister, Mrs. H. C. 
Mohler and Mrs. Mary Little Kitchell, '60, wife of Pana's 
benefactor. Captain J. W. Kitchell, in whose beautiful 
home the Secretary received most delightful entertainment. 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE GUILD 

On Saturday afternoon, March 17th, Mrs. Marietta 
Mathers Rowe, an alumnae trustee of the college, enter- 
tained resident alumnae and several former students at her 
delightful home with characteristic hospitality. 
Paf« Twenty-two 



The College Greeting's 



While the visiting over pretty bits of needle work was in 
progress, the company was called to order and under the 
chairmanship of Mrs. Lillian Gray Carpenter, class of 1904, 
the plan of organizing an Illinois Woman's College Guild 
was discussed with much enthusiasm and with entire 
unanimity of opinion. Thereupon it was moved and voted 
with a standing vote that such guild be organized and those 
present subscribed their names as members, and further- 
more, pledged themselves to secure other members. 

The object of the guild is to promote an interest in the 
welfare of the college by securing co-operation of effort in 
any plans that may be devised for this purpose. Member- 
ship in the guild will be extended to alumnae, former stu- 
dents and friends who will unite in the purpose of the or- 
ganization, and will contribute annually something that 
will help in its work. 

Illinois Woman's College contributes much to the educa- 
tional, the social and financial life of the city, and it is be- 
lieved that in recognition of this helpful influence many 
will desire membership in this guild. 



EXCHANGES 

We are glad to welcome several new Exchanges: The 
Monmouth Oracle, William Woods College Record, Central 
Wesley an Star, Eureka College Pegasus, The Frances 
Shriner's Record, and the College Chronicle from North- 
western College. 

The College Chronicle enters into the events of the town 
in a way that ought to gain the ready support of the people. 
In the March 2nd number there is an account of the dedi- 
cation of the First Evangelical Church. However, there 
is too little school news to balance well. 

The school news of the Pegasus is unusually abundant. 
The three quotations from Stevenson on the title page are 
very appropriate in their inspiration. 

Pas* Tweat7-t]Lr«« 




The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 



The arrangement of material is the only thing we would 
criticize in the William Woods College Record. The 
articles and stories are splendid but there seems to be no 
definite division ot departments in the paper. 

The Frances Shriners' Record is unusually full of fasci- 
nating articles, short sketches, stories, local and depart- 
mental news. The whole appearance speaks of an ener- 
getic and careful staff. 

What the Knox Student lacks in the way of stories it 
makes up in interesting di.scussion of College affairs. Some 
lighter articles would make the paper more interesting to 
outsiders. 

The College Rambler has issued a splendid Alumni num. 
ber. Several of our exchanges have tried these alumni 
numbers with great success. Such a number has just been 
received from Lincoln College showing the loyalty of the 
alumni in coming to their aid after they have been so dis- 
srranged by fire. 

One of our most looked for exchanges is the Carthage 
Collegian. The March numbe is especially good. 

The Northwestern Magazine has been presenting some 
very interesting critical studies on literary men who have 
influenced modern life and thought. There is a very 
strong one on Henrik Ibsen in the February number. 

The Rockford Ralla of February comes to us with some 
stories above the average. The neatness and attractive 
presentation of material makes this one of our most fre- 
quently read exchanges. 

The Optimist has shown marked improvement this year 
in the variety and choice of material. The March number 
has an unusually full exchange column. 



Page Twenty-four 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe Say 


J. P. BROWN 


We can furnish your 

Shoes and Party Slippers 

in the popular styles 

leathers, and 

fabrics 


Sheet Music and Musical 
Merchandise 

Talking Machines and Supplies 
Mail Orders Solicited 




S. W. Cor. Square 


Darlings of the forest! Blossoming- alone 
When Earth's grief is sorest for her jewels gone — 
Ere the last snow-drift melts your tender buds have 
blown. 

— Rose T. Cooke, Trailing- Arbutus. 


JOHN K. LONG 




Job Printing" 


Hillerby's 


Engraved Cards and Invitations 

Loose Leaf Note Books 
Illinois Phone 400 


Dry Goods Store 

Safest Place 
to Trade 


1 10 North West St. 




Doni in 

ALL KINDS OF FRESH and 
SALT MEATS. FISH, 


Ask your grocer for 

HOLSUM 

BREAD 


POULTRY, ETC. 
Both Phones 196 230 W. State St. 


Made clean. Delivered clean 
in waxed paper wrappers 



GEO. T. DOUGLAS 

FANCY GROCERIISS 
234 West State St. 738 E. North St. 



A BOUQUET OF SPRING FLOWERS 



Joseph Heinl & Sons 

FLORISTS 
Jacksonville, 111. Both Phones 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 



DR. KOPPERL 

Dentist 

326 w. state St. 



SHOES 



We invite you to come to our 

store and look over a line 

of shoes that are right 

W. T. REAUGH 

Fashionable Footwear 
South Side Sq. 



E. W. BASSETT 

OOL-L-EOE JEWEL-FRX 

Copper and Brass Goods, Desk Clocks, Desk Sets, Chaf- 
ing" Dishes, Percolators, Alcohol Stoves, Kettles. 

COLLEGE AND SOCIETY STATIONERY 

SPECIAL SOCIETY ENGRAVING 

DONE TO ORDER 

Kodak Supplies Amateur Finishing 

21 South Side Square 



Hang--head Bluebell, 

Bending" like Moses^ sister over Moses , 


Full of a secret thou dar'st not tell! 




— Georg"e McDonald. 


A BARGAIN 




IN STATIONERY 




78 Sheets of Linen Paper 
and 50 Envelopes to match 

all for 25c 


H. J. & L. M. SMITH 
Fancy Bazaar and Millinery 


Armstrongs Drug Store 


211 West state street 


The Quality Store 




Southwest Comer Square 




W. A. PETERS 


I DO 


TAILOR 

315 W. State St. 111. Phone 169 

Suits, Coats and Skirts 
tnade to order by expert tailors 


Kodak Finishing" 
Bromide enlarging" 
Flashlights 
and Views 


Cleaning", Pressing", Dying" 

and alterations of all kinds 

Special rates to students 


CLAUDE B. VAIL 

Oswald's Drug Store, 71 E. Side Square 


Work called for and delivered promptly. 


Residence Phone. HI. 1493 



MONTGOMERY & DEPPE'S 

Everything in Dry Goods— Well Lighted 
first floor cloak and wsult room 

Agents for Ladies Home Jonrual Patterns 
The new "Howd" front laced corsets 


I love the fair lilies and roses so g-ay, 

They are rich in their pride and their splendor; 

But still more do I love to wander away 

To the meadow so sweet, where down at my feet, 

The harebell blooms modest and tender. 

Dora Goodale. 


SNERLY & TAYLOR 
Select Groceries 

221 West state Street 


Cloaks. Su/rs. Ft/nsjuioM/iiMEm^ 

Established 1890 

Low Prices, Square Dealing^ 
Keep us busy 


GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 


Illinois Phone 57 Bell Phone 92 

Fresh Drugs, Fancy Goods, 

Stationery 

THE 
BADGER DRUG STORE 

2 doors West of Postoffice 
235 E. State Street. 



Dr. Ai^byn Lincoln Adams 

Oculist and Aurist to 

School for the Blind 

323 W. state St. 

Practice limited to diseases of 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 


Dr. R. R. BUCKTHORPE 
Dentist 

( nt House 1054. 
PhonesK Bell. Office 512. 
1 111. Office 750. 

Over Hatch Drug Store 

Jacksonville, 111. 


See the purple trilliums blooming- 
Rich and stately, everywhere. 


DENNIS SCHRAM 

Jeweler 

College Pins, Spoons, Etc. 

South Side Square 
JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 


DR. CARL E. BLACK 

Office— 349 E. State St. 
Telephone, either line, No. 85. 

Residence — 1305 West State Street 

Telephone, either line, No. 285 
Surgery— Passav^ant Memorial Hospit- 
al and Our Savior's Hospital 
Hospital Hours — 9 a. m. to 12 m. 
Office Hours— 1:30 to 4 p. m. Even- 
ings and Sundays by appointment 


BARGAIN BOOK STORE 

West State Street 


EXPERIENCED HAIR DRESSER 

I am prepared to manufacture hair 
combings in the latest style. Sham- 
pooing and scalp massage done by ap- 
pointment at your residence. 

FLORENCE KIRK KING 

503 W. CollegejSt. 111. Phone 837 



F. J. WADDELL & CO. 

Suits, Coats, Costumes, Skirts, Waists, Corsets 

Muslin Underwear, Gloves, Hosiery 

Novelties and Newest Models 

Shown always at moderate prices 



The buttercups, bright eyed and bold. 

Held up their chalices of g"old 

To catch the sunshine and the dew. 

— Julia Dorr. 




We Repair Shoes 



THE NEW SHOE STORE 
For Dressy Footwear 

The classy new shoe store is offering a classy 
lot of shoe styles. 

We make an extra effort to supply the wants 
of College trade in their various shoe wants, 
street shoes, dress slippers, lounging slippers. 

HOPPERS 

Southeast Corner Sq. 



IVIi^rIt^J 

Jacksonvilles Largest Mens' Store 

Pennants and Banners 

I. W. C. and Fraternity special designs 

Manish Cut Sweater Coats 

Hand Bags, Trunks 

and Suit Cases 



McCULLOUGH BROS. 

Professional 
Photographers 

Hockenhull Bldg. 



SKIRT BOXES 

ROCKKRS, SCREENS, DESKS 

AND BED ROOM CURTAINS 

AT 

JOHNSOiNF, HACKETT & GUTHRIE'S 



Anemones and seas of Gold, 
And new-blown lilies of the river 
And those sweet flow'rets that unfold 
Their buds in Camadera's quiver. 



— Moore. 



F. E. Farrell E. E. Crabtree 

p; Established 1865 

P. G. FARRELL & CO. 

BANKERS 

Successors to First National Bank 

Jacksonville, 111. 



C. S. MARTIN 

Fine Pictures — Artistic Framing 

Frames and Ovals of all 

descriptions and sizes 

314 W. State St., Scott Block 

Jacksonville, 111. 




HF»m 






Frank Elliott, Pres. Wm. R. Routt, V.-Pres. 

C. A. Johnson, Vice-Pres. 

J. Weir Elliott, Cashier 

J. AUerton Palmer, Asst. Cashier 

ELLIOTT STATE BANK 

Jacksonville, 111. 
Capital $150,000 

Undivided Profits $ 12,000 

DIRECTORS 
Frank Elliott Frank R. Elliott 

J. Weir Elliott Jobn A. Bellatti 

W^m. R. Koutt C. A. Johasou 

Wm. S. Elliott 



PACIFIC^jHOTEL 

tt. Foulk J. B. Snell 
Proprietors 

jACKSONVILIvE, ILWNOIS 



Special Offer to Studentsl 

Any of my ^5, ^6, $'j and ^8 Carbon 
or Platinum Photos, cabinet size 

3 for $1.00 

NOT GOOD AFTER MAY 1st 

Only 3 at this price to a student 

Special Rates on other sizes 

McDougall's Studio 

West State Street 



It is the Spring time: April violets glow 

In wayside nooks, close clustering into groups, 

lyike shy elves hiding from the traveller's eye. 

— Read. 



"ROBERTS' for QUALITY" 

Is not a mere phrase. It is the foundation of our success 
and reputation and our aim for the future. 

ROBERTS BROTHERS 

HIGH GRADE GROCERY AND PHARMACY 



DELIVERY SERVICE 



PHONE 800 



v,s,T EHNIES' 



FOR 



FRESH HOME MADE CANDY 

Pure Ice Cream and Soda Water 

Fine Box Chocolates 

216 EAST STATE ST. 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING 

for the latest iu Suits, Ladies' Underwear, Ribbons, 

Laces, Kmbroidery Materials or Notions 

Visit the store that carries the 

up to date merchandise 

PHE^LPS & OSBORNE 



I know the wa}' she went 

Home with her maiden posy. 

For her feet have touch 'd the meadows 

And left the daisies rosy. 

— Tennyson, Maud. 



CHAS. M. HOPPKR 

Dentist 

2ii S. Side Square 



COOK 

LIGHT with GAS 

hi:at 

Jacksonville Railway & 
Lig*ht Company 

224 South Main Street 



Brady Brothers 

Hardware, Cutlery 
Paints 



Fancy Toilets Christmas Goods 

COOVER & SHREVE'S 
Drug Store 



Kodaks and Supplies 

Developtng and Finishing 




Andre & Andre 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS OF QUALITY 
When you think of Furnishing^s for 
the Home or Office 
THINK OF US 

48-50 North Side Square 



He held a basket full 
Of^all sweet herbs that searching* eye could cull, 
Wild thyme, and valley-lilies whiter still 
Than Leda's love, and cresses from the rill. 

— Keats, Endymio7i. 



The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital . . . $200,000 
Surplus . . . 20,000 

Deposits . . . 1,100,000 
U. S. Depository for Postal Savings Bank 
Julius B. Strawn, President 
Miller Weir, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear, H.J. Rog- 
ers, A- A. Curry, C. B. Graff 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



We make a specialty of catering- to I. W. C. students 
We also make nice Birthday Cakes with dates and ini- 
itials and delicious new Sundaes which colleg"e g"irls 
appreciate so much. 
Phone us your wants and we will deliver same to college 
Let us furnish you an estimate on your next class recep- 
tion or social function of any kind. 
We have both phones. No. 227 

VICKERY & MERRIGAN 
Caterers 527 West State St. 



The most dainty thing's in Ring's and Jewelry. New 

and handsome styles of goods in Sterling Siver. 

Highest grades of Cut Glass, and every ^description 

of Spectacles and Rye Glasses 

Pine Diamonds a Speciality 

at 

RUSSELL & LYON'S 

West Side Square 
Both Phones 96 



We have short time to stay as you 
We have as short a spring; 
As quick a growth to meet decay 
As you or anything. 

— Herrick, Daffodils. 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

CitysSteam'Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 E. State St. Jacksonville, 111. 
Illinois Telephone 388 



readies' High Grade, I^ate Style 
FUR SCARFS and MUFFS 

ARB SOLD BY 

Frank Byrns 

S^ Most Reasonable Prices 



College Girls are invited to take 
advantage of the resources of this 
store for supplying their needs in 
the dry goods line. Dress Goods, 
Silks, Ribbons, Laces, Handker- 
chiefs, ets. are to be had here in 
attractive patterns at poplar prices. 




HocKENHuu Bloc Jacksonville, lu. 



"A DELIGHTFUL RIDK" 

This will always be the cry 

if the rig" came from 

CHERRY'S 

Horses are fine travelers but 
g-entle and safe. 

All equipagfe the finest 
Call either phone 

CHERRY'S LIVERY 



Ipboto portraiture 

Successor to 
The Watson Studio 

Southwest Corner Square 



Dear common flower, that gfrow'st beside the way, 
Fringing" the dusty road with harmless gold, 
First pledg-e of blithesome May, 
Which children pluck, and, full of pride, uphold. 
— Lowell, To the Dandelion. 



We always have 

The Latest Novelties 

for Young Women 

We have made our success by 

anticipating 
Correct Styles for each season 

EVENING Slippers 
JAMES McGINNIS & CO. 

62 EBst Side Square 



Piepenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 

HERE TO PLEASE 

Candies, Cakes, Cookies, Pies 

Sandwiches, Pop on Ice, 

Groceries, 

California Fruits, 

School Supplies 



HARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO. 

Designs, Cut Flowers 
Plants 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

Store: Pell Phone 154, 111, 182 

Greehouses, Bell 775 



GIRLS: Come and visit me 
at my little Hat Shop 
give especial attention and 
prices to college girls. 

DORA P. ROBINSON 

537 South Diamond Street 






Zhc GollCQC (SxcctiwQB 

CffThe College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 
€[|Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all- departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month. 

<jf Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies 15c. 
<IJEntered at Jacksonville PostofSce as second class matter. 



Contents 

Editorial ..,.,., 3 

A lyay of Ancient Rome 4 

A Few Moments in a Blackberry Patch ........ 5 

Off Schedule Time 7 

Aunt Maria's]Vulnerable Spot 8 

The Time But not the Place for Dreaming 10 

My Study Window ix 

In the Bond of Misery 13 

The Endowment 15 

The Greetings Office 16 

The Glee Club 17 

From the Reporter's Note-book 19 

Department Notes 20 

Society Notes 21 

Alumnae Notes 23 

Annual Report of Greetings Treasurer 24 



Now, the bright morning star, Day's harbinger. 
Comes dancing from the east, and leads with her 
The flowery May, who from her green cap throws 
The yellow cowslip and the pale primrose. 
Hail, bounteous May that dost inspire 
Mirth and young and warm desire! 
Woods and groves are of thy dressing 
Mill and dale doth boast thy blessing. 
Thus we salute thee with our early song, 
And welcome thee and wish thee long. 




-Milton. 



^ 



i^W 



XLhc College (greetings 

Vol. XV. Jacksonville, 111., May, 191 2 No. 7 

Faculty Committee — Miss Weaver, Miss Tanner, Miss Cowgill 
Editor — Jauette C. Powell 

Associate Editors — Louise Gates, Helen Moore, Edith Lyles 
Business Managers — Annette Rearick, Myrtle Walker, Marian 
Lombard. 



As the end of the school year draws near, there is natur- 
ally a tendency to look backward over the year's work. 
Classes, societies, parties, college functions of all sorts have 
each their place in memory books and better still, in the 
memories themselves. From Freshman to Senior, college 
organizations occupy no small place in these recollections. 
I^iterary society. Glee Club, Y. W. C. A., Athletic Asso- 
ciation has each its own special niche. Good times with- 
out number, enriched friendships, training along executive 
lines are accredited to one or another of these organizations, 
but the appeal of each of these is of necessity limited to 
the few whose interests may be centered in any one of 
these lines of work. 

There is one organization, however, whose interest ex- 
tends to all college affairs. The "Greetings", reflecting as 
it does the best of class, society and college loyalty is a 
vital factor of college unity. The best work in all depart- 
ments is, as far as possible, represented in every issue. 
For all visions and plans for the upbuilding of I. W. C. it 
should be the natural outlet. Through the year it has been 
the endeavor of the staff to make the paper both profitable 
and interesting, to emphasize its rightful place in the school 
life and to give through it an added impulse to all college 
movements. Too long has there been the tendency on the 
part of the student body to feel that the "Greetings" was 
not of their making. This attitude is altogether at variance 
with the policy of the paper. To stimulate and sustain in- 

Pa£B Three 



The C o 1 1 e g- 1 Greeting's 




terest in its welfare is the duty of each student. In so far 
as each one realizes and fulfills this responsibility just so 
far does she promote the interests of the paper that reflects 
the life of her college. 



A LAY OF ANCIENT ROME 
Tarpeia 

1 The Roman maid Tarpeia — 
To us the tale comes down — 
Was bribed by hostile Sabines 
To let them in the town; 
'Tis not for us to judge her, 
Yet this we can but say, 
That ihe, defying every fate 
Traitor proved; at any rate 
The Sabines gained the day. 

2 Tarpeia was a Vestal, 
Intent on sacred lights, 
She stole out from the city 
For water for the rites; 
The Sabine leader saw her 
And marked her for his prey, 

He vowed that she his means should be 
Sabine girls from foes to free 
And enter Rome that day. 

3 "Fair Roman, you can help us, 
Name any price you will 
Whate'er it be, I, Tatius 

Will truly it fulfill. 

Our aim to take your stronghold. 

Will work no harm to you, 

If you the gates will open wide, 

Leave the fort unoccupied, 

And further, our will do. " 

Pas« Four 



The C o 1 1 e §• e Greetings 



"Your terms to sell my country, 
However wrong, I'll take. 
The trinkets on your left arm 
Shall be my honor's stake; 
Now come and wreak your vengeance 
But promise me my will." 
They promised it by all the fates, 
Wide she spread the city gates. 
The Sabines entered, still. 

She cried, "Now keep your promise 

For I had better stay 

A Vestal, than turn traitress 

And not receive my pay." 

"Your own terms we will give you," 

Said all with one accord; 

Each dashed on her a heavy shield 

Such as only strong men wield. 

The traitor's just reward. 

The cliff on which they slew her, 

From her now takes its name. 

The traitors whom they cast down 

Perpetuate her fame. 

And yet some deem her guiltless 

And would her tale relate 

As if they, seeing through her trick 

Shields on her had rained down thick 

And thus her cruel fate. — I/. H. '15. 



A FEW MOMENTS IN A BLACKBERRY 
PATCH 

Slowly and reluctantly, I unlatched the gate which 
opened into the bugbear of summer vacation, the black berry 
patch. There were no rows of neatly trimmed bushes with 
the dew still sparkling on the glossy black fruit; nothing 

Page FlTtt 





The C o 1 1 e g- 1 Greetings 



quite so poetic or beautiful as that. I was confronted by 
a tangled mass of vines, shrubs, briars and brambles. Here 
and there a tree top towered above the tall canes but the 
greater part of the patch was in the glaring hot sun. As for 
berries, they were hidden in the most difficult and prickliest 
places possible. 

After searching a while I spied an opening in this 
wilderness, a very slight one, where the tall stiff shoots and 
the tough slender runners had been bent down or thrust 
aside. Loathe to commence my unwelcome task, I looked 
about, picking out all the spots that looked cool and com- 
fortable. Near me was an apple tree, with low spreading 
branches which would make ideal perches for summer 
dreams. The cool leaves screened the gnarled trunk from 
the burning July sun ; there was a slight breeze among them, 
too. Even the grass beneath looked soft and inviting. 
Chiggers seemed more desirable than briar scratches. 

A sudden recollection that these berries were wanted 
in the near future recalled me from vain wishing. I put on 
a despised sunbonnet, that scratched my ears annoyingly, 
and seizing my bucket creeped and crawled into that meagre 
opening. Scarcely had I straightened my bonnet after my 
awkward entrance, when several emphatic yanks at my 
dress stopped further progress. Prickly little runners aided 
by some big stickers, held me securely. As it was either 
leave part of my skirt behind or untangle the brambles, I 
stooped over impatiently. A sudden pull, and my bonnet 
remained above, hung up on some long convenient briars. 
Bareheaded, as I then was, I found my hair the prey of 
prickly leaves. And then it tumbled down, getting in my 
eyes and sticking to my hot, perspiring face as I struggled 
with my dress. At last I was free and began to look for 
berries, heartily wishing that such a thing as berries had 
never been known. The entire patch seemed to be hostile, 
standing there tauntingly enjoying my discomfort. Even 
the bees buzzed alarmingly near my head and the wiggly 

Page Six 



. ^ , The C o 1 1 e sr e Greeting's ,._. 
^ ^^ 

spiders dangled in front of my eyes. Disgust, painfully 
mingled with smarting was added to my ailments when 1 
discovered that both sleeves and gloves were short — a com- 
bination planned for comfort. Wrath at my own thought- 
lessness and all berries in general became the foremost of 
my varied emotions. 

In and out, through that treacherous path I wound, 
stepping over half broken stems, dodging under low arching 
brambles and even kneeling at times in order to reach the 
black clusters, which were always about three inches too 
far away. Thus in a spirit of conquer or be scratched to 
death, I stuck to my berry picking as persistently as the 
briars stuck to me, until the bucket was fairly heavy and 
my patience thoroughly exhausted. 

— F. S. '15. 



OFF SCHEDULE TIME 

Ch-ch-ch-ch-c-chug, puffed the engine. 

There we were, in the mud, at nine o'clock at night, 
several miles from home. The twenty-minute ride to the 
neighboring town with a good confectionery as the goal 
had been such an incentive that the hovering black storm 
clouds had hung unnoticed. 

The clouds were there to serve their purpose, however, 
and just as we reached the pavement the big round rain 
drops came splattering down, each eager to see which would 
reach the soft dusty bed first. We were quite the source of 
amusement as we stood there on the main street, helpless 
onlookers, while the boys, thoroughly soaked, learned how 
to put the storm curtains on an automobile. Every piece 
was worse than a new break in a Chinese puzzle. After 
about four times the necessary work in adjusting the cur- 
tains so that the entire sides might be covered, the chains 
remained to test tempers. In all those precious minutes 
fumbled away, the rain had gained such a start that the 




The College Greeting's 



decree came sternly from our amateur chauffeur that no 
time could be lost in waiting for ice cream. 

For the first mile or two, the machine whizzed along 
nicely, but then it began to puff and skid. The mud rolled 
up in great wads but through it we plowed, until the water 
in the radiator boiled with such vengeance that we had to 
stop to cool the engine. The rain, continuing to come down 
in torrents, made each attempt at starting harder than the 
one preceding. The sharp curve in the road, where we 
had good cause to remember the deep ditch on each side, 
had been safely turned. We felt half the fear lifted but 
just then the rear of the machine suddenly whirled across 
the road, causing more consternation than ever. 

Surely there was something wrong with the rear chains. 
When we stopped at the next house to fill the radiator the 
boys took that occasion to wade around to examine the 
wheels. The right chain was gone so a farther stroll in the 
mud was necessary to find it. They knew that the chain 
would do us no good then but the chauffeur had hopes of 
his father's wrath being Jess furious if he returned the 
machine whole, even though it were muddy. 

Started once more, we crept, skidded, then suddenly 
lurched forward in that stuffy machine filled with muddy 
chains and still muddier oxfords. At the last stop when 
we had hoped everything might be quiet, the old engine 
chugged louder than ever and I felt only a part of what was 
awaiting me when I caught the first sound of my father's 
voice, as he invited me into the house. 

— M. U '15. 



AUNT MARIA'S VULNERABLE SPOT 

Before the accusing finger of his Aunt Maria stood 
Tony with downcast eyes. He had just been caught in the 
second attempt to make his way to the forbidden circus 
grounds. His knees, begrimed in trying to crawl under the 



The C o 1 1 e g- e Greetings 




back gate; the huge rent in his shirt where it had caught 
on the barbed wire ; even the slouch of the tattered hat over 
his forehead — all spoke his guilt, 

"But, Aunt Maria. I was — " 

"Not a word, Tony Barton ! Here you've been left to 
me to raise, and you commence with these scandalous pro- 
ceedin's. I don't care if you have gone bofore. That's 
a part of your heathenish bringin'-up. I declare I'll tie 
you up, or" — breathless, she added — "do something to keep 
you out of mischief." 

"Oh, but th' elephunts," he wailed. "You can feed 
'em peanuts. An' the lions roar at you in their cages." 

Aunt Maria only shook her head determinedly. Grasp- 
ing firmly the boy's protesting hand, she began dragging 
him up the walk. He wriggled and squirmed, but Aunt 
Maria was about three times his size. The little figure, 
however, tugging and pulling back with all its might, suc- 
ceeded in greatly retarding their progress. By this time 
he was sobbing and choking. He didn't want to be locked 
up; he might go fishing if he couldn't see the circus. He 
had visions of being compelled to spend the long, hot after- 
noon on the front porch, poring over the catechism, while the 
other fellows trailed by to the circus. "Hi, there, Tony. 
Ain't yuh goin'? Aw, come on." He could hear them 
now. Oh, the ignominy of it all! He'd suffer anything 
rather than that. 

Suddenly an idea occurred to him. He would try 
strategy. Choking back the sobs, he suggested warily, "Aunt 
Maria, I was goin* to bring you somethin'. There's a man 
what sells beautiful chiny dishes — all for ten cents, too." 

If his aunt hesitated, it was only for a second, for she 
cast a disdainful glance in his direction, as much as to say, 
in support of her superiority, "As if I'd have any of that 
cheap stuff." 

Tony, however, was quick to see his advantage and to 
pursue it. "It's got a gold rim and big, pink roses all 
'round." 



^ti-I-..';: P*««Nlne 




The C o 1 1 e g- e Greetings [lij 

"How do you know what it looks like?" Her voice was 
sharp, but betrayed some interest. 

"Well, Jimrny Lewis's ma got one last year, and it's 
in the center of the table all the time, now. She says that's 
one time she got her money's worth." 

Aunt Maria was weakening decidedly. "Well, Jane 
Lewis generally does know a bargain when she sees it, but 
I'm not going to let her beat me." She loosened her hold 
on Tony's collar and his hand, saying sourly, "There's no 
sense in it, but since you seem so bound to go, I guess I 
ought to take you. Well, you run in and change your shirt 
while I brush up a bit." Tony, with a prodigious wink at 
some imaginary object, was off for the house. 

— B. B. '14 



THE TIME BUT NOT THE PLACE FOR 
DREAMING 

"Oh, don't close the door, please," came in a petulant 
voice from a rather large girl as each member of the class 
straggled listlessly into the room. Apparently bordering 
upon suffocation, she fanned herself fretfully with the back 
of her note book. 

Her appearance only portrayed the way the rest of us 
felt. Everything "flapable" was used for making a breeze 
in the hot and stuffy class room. As the girls wandered in, 
invariably each paused before the open window to look wist- 
fully at the long, cool shadows, then languidly expressed 
her opinion of such weather. Spring fever was unmis- 
takably the malady of the morning. Even the instructor, 
lacking her accustomed energy, forgot to ask the usual re- 
view dates. 

The Reign of Terror held no charms for me. After I 
had told what I could remember about it, I let my gaze 
follow a white butterfly that was dipping and darting around 
our drowsy heads. I dreamily watched it fly out of the 
Page Ten 



HMIBMIIIH I iaaWllliaiH BWBiBIWBBW W 




The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 



window and light for a moment upon the dehcate bells of 
a hyacinth, then fly on across the shade checkered campus 
until it vanished. I was just wondering if that butterfly 
half appreciated his airy privilege, when sounds wafted to 
us from the music hall and the love-alls and duces of a 
tennis game, made history seem very vague and very 
ancient. To complete our distraction, the fountain began 
to whirl and sprinkle its sparkling drops over the dainty 
flowers about the basin. Nothing seemed so desirable as 
to watch the sun make rainbows in each spray. Beyond the 
fountain the swings looked so much more comfortable than 
my chair. ^ 

The half hour bell broke in upon my thoughts. Where 
was my mind? It seemed to evade every attempt I made 
to make it grasp what my ears were hearing. Vaguely I 
heard the voices about me reciting. What were they say- 
ing? The bees and the swish of the fountain made such 
a pleasant lullaby, the grass looked so soft and cool under 
the trees that I simply could not think. Dimly I was resolv- 
ing to spend my next free hour there when a friendly pinch 
brought me back to the class room. The question was 
repeated again. Evidently I was expected to answer it. 
Wildly I searched my memory for the topic of the lesson. 
How vain was the search. The hour bell saved me from 
confessing, and the class languidly straggled from the room. 

-F. S. '15. 



MY STUDY WINDOW 

In the morning sunshine of her east window sat Helen, 
staring wistfully down at the smooth, green campus. She 
sighed as her glance strayed to the Latin work spread out 
before her. When such glorious weather was to be enjoyed 
outside for the asking, it was surely a waste of time to 
pore over stupid books. 

The sunshine clear and pure, as it is only in the few 
weeks of early Spring, flickered and wavered in long, uncer- 
tain yellow shafts on the soft green of the grass. The 
small poplar trees with their fresh green leaves seemed to 





The C o 1 1 e g- 1 Greeting's 



be flaunting their superiority over their tall neighbor, the 
maple, whose leaves were as yet only tiny, brownish green 
specks. There was just enough breeze to lift the leaves of 
the poplar that wavered and danced uncertainly. Helen, in 
idle fancy, could imagine they were waving their tiny green 
hands at her in invitation to come out and enjoy the sun- 
shine with them. 

The one jarring note in the picture was a prosaic lawn- 
mower of the most insistently noisy and rattling type, which 
occupied a place of importance in the foreground. The 
negro, who was supposed to be manipulating it, walked 
along with such a languid air that Helen wondered if the 
lawnmower were not doing the propelling and the man 
merely submitting to be urged along by it, from necessity. 
Another man, in a glaring blue coat, which jarred harshly 
with the soft green of the background, was wielding a rakej 
with slow, languorous motions, stopping frequently to mop'' 
his forehead and exchange a lazy word with his companion. 

Farther to the left, two girls sauntered slowly across 
the lawn to a large rope swing and sank laughingly into 
their seats with a lazy air of enjoyment. Their books, for 
they had evidently had intentions to study, soon dropped 
unheeded to the ground as they too came under the magic 
spell of Spring. Helen stirred enviously in her uncom- 
fortable position, glancing lazily at the book spread out 
before her. 

Several minutes passed; still her book lay unheeded. 
Pushing it to one side with an impatient shove, she lay with 
her head on the window sill. As she gazed with half-closed 
eyes, a dreamy, languorous feeling of content crept over 
her. Her worries of a few minutes before were all for- 
gotten in reverie. 

The noisy lawnmower was still; the girls had left the 
swing, which still swayed with slow motions. Now the 
charm was complete in its restful, dreamy atmosphere. A 
sullen jangle of the gong suddenly sounded, rudely inter- 
rupting the carefree reverie. — M. H. '12. 



The College Greeting 



IN THE BOND OF MISERY 

The theory that our experiences and sensations may 
be many and varied in a remarkably small space has passed 
without challenge. Now to the application of the truth to 
the chair that I occupy in Freshman English class ! 

On the days when we are to have a discussion of the 
text, I can lean forward itj my chair with eager interest ; or 
even under the ordeal of dissecting clauses I cling to the 
selfsame spot with a half timid sense of assurance. But on 
theme days! I enter the classs room at the last minute, 
sheepishly slide into my place, thinking, "Oh, dear, will 
she call on me? Can it possibly pass muster?" My only 
consolation is that there are twenty kindred spirits, and 
sympathy joins the self-pity in my heart. No matter how 
gladly I would shrivel up and gather the chair about me 
for protection, there is no evading the voice, which seems 
to hold an appeal and a crisp command at the same time. 
With a look at me that there's no mistaking comes the 
dreaded, "May we have your theme now, please?" 

After a gasp and an imploring half -reproachful look, 
my hands unfold the shaking sheets of that abominable 
theme. At the start, my voice is thick and husky, but after 
clearing my throat once or twice that tickling sensation 
passes away. For a minute, I stumble along fairly well; 
then comes a seemingly unexplainable pause, for the simple 
reason that I must choke down the lump that will come 
unexpectedly. Somehow after a series of gasps and gurgles, 
I manage to bring my floundering attempt to an end. Then 
that queer, all-gone feeling surges over me ; and I sink back 
limply against the cold, black, unfeeling chair, scarcely 
hearing or caring about the glaring criticism, which must 

inevitably follow. 

— B. B. '14. 

Pii<« Thlrt««a 



The C o 1 1 e §■ t Greeting's 




I slide forward a little as I pick up my theme, trying 
vainly, meanwhile, to unhook my feet from the rounds of 
my chair. My throat is dry and all the blood in my body 
seems to rush to my head. I feel as if the power of articu- 
lation had left me, but nevertheless I start to read. What 
a tame beginning, is my first thought. The words sound 
inane and flat to me. Why didn't I work out a smoother 
expression of that thought? Farther down the page, too, 
what I have, doesn't half say what I meant. 

By the time I finish the first page both mouth and 
throat feel as if I had been eating crackers for wages. With 
difficulty I proceed. Then I come directly upon a word that 
I forgot to look up — I'm positive the spelling is wrong — 
and the pronunciation ! My panic stricken brain is not 
calmed by a hasty glance toward the desk. The pencil is 
almost exceeding the speed limit and I have a vague, fleeting 
impression that those about me are taking more notes than 
is common. Then immediately follows the thought, what 
a target my theme will be, but who could blame anyone for 
taking aim? 

Where in the world were my eyes and mind when I 
wrote this thing? Faulty structure, bad punctuation, and 
poorly expressed ideas stare at me as I travel through the 
pages. And to think I had to read it right after a really 
good paper. I reach the last words; such an ending! In 
the instant I have a faint glimpse of another that would 
have been more fitting. Everything drops here, there is 
no tone or color in it. Now in the theme read just before — 
but there I find consolation, a good example of contrast 
has been given to the class. 

The trial is over. I fold my paper, slide back in my 
chair and await the arrows which commence to shoot from 
every direction. 

-F. S. '15. 



Page FourUMi 



The C o 1 1 e g" e Greetings 




COLLEGE EVENTS 

THE ENDOWMENT 

On Thursday, April 11, was started a campaign that is 
more far-reaching in its possibilities than any previous un- 
dertaking of the Illinois Woman's College. 

Never before in the history of the College has the loyal 
support of alumnae, stu4ent body, faculty and friends been 
more necessary than now. 

The future of the College now depends upon an imme- 
diate endowment, and if we cannot secure it, our very ex- 
istence as a college is threatened. We must go forward, and 
"What we must do, we can do." 

No college can fulfill the purpose for which it was cre- 
ated, and meet the demands made upon it by the American 
nation today unless it has a liberal endowment and a good 
equipment. The University Senate has therefore decided 
that no college can continue to be ranked as a standard col- 
lege unless it has an endowment of $100,000 and a plant 
free of all indebtedness. That means that by June, 1913, 
we of the Illinois Woman's College must have $180,000 to 
meet these requirements. 

Our future has never seemed brighter, and for the sake 
of those students who have been here in the past, for those 
who are to come and for ourselves, we dare not fail. 

In Chapel on this Thursday morning. Dr. Harker told 
of the imperative need for immediate action and appealed 
to the enthusiasm and help of the students, in a determined 
effort to secure this endowment. The response was imme- 
diate, genuine and earnest. 

A chart had been placed in the Chapel on which were 
180 squares, each representing $1,000. Dr. Harker stepped 
to the chart and checked twelve squares — and thus the cam- 
paign was formally begun. 

Pftge FiCt«en 




The College Greetings 



If only some one would start with a gift of $10,000 
now, for we believe there will be $50,000 by Commencement 
of this year ! Do you think our hopes are too high, or our 
faith too strong? If that is true, it is because we have 
caught the spirit of our President. 



THE GREETINGS OFFICE 

With arrival of new furnishings the "Greetings" office 
was opened with due formality Thursday, April 4. A part 
of the chapel hour was in charge of the "Greetings" board. 
The various members of the staff seemed at no loss to in- 
form the uninitiated of their various trials in the making 
of a college paper. The editor spoke in plain terms of cer- 
tain unavoidable delays and annoyances that prevent the new 
chair's whirling in perfect harmony. One of the associate 
editors supplemented this complaint by a word to those con- 
tributors who do their best to lessen the dismal creakings 
of the official chair by voluntary contributions and enthusi- 
astic co-operation. The business manager then told of the 
recent housecleaning in the Greetings household, that had 
resulted so happily in a removal of all official documents from 
"anybody's room" to the "Greetings Office." This removal 
however, had brought many facts to light, not the least in- 
teresting was a subscription list with all too many unpaid 
marks after a surprising number of names. 

At the conclusion of the "editor's talk to subscribers," 
all were most cordially invited to the office by means of the 
following poem written by an especially enthusiastic con- 
tributor and read by another of the associate editors : 

We've extended hearty greetings 
To you all assembled here, 

But we don't propose to spend our time 
In talking — never fear. 

You'll find the staff is doing things 
And if you'll lend your eyes, 

Flag* SixtMn 




The College Greetings 




You'll find them opened good and wide 

To our long-planned surprise. 
Please turn your steps to Harker Hall, 

The second floor's your station, 
And there behold the cause itself 

Of all your speculation ; 
You'll see a light diffuse itself 

From up above the door, 
The golden letters serve to show 

The beauty of our floor. 
Be sure to go and just drop in 

And take a look around, 
We'll be on hand to welcome you 

And burst with pride in our new quarters 
The Greetings we'll extend to you 

As our true, firm supporters. 



THE GLEE CLUB 

The Annual Concert of the Glee Club took place Mon- 
day evening, April 15, at the Music Hall. An appreciative 
audience of fair proportions was in attendance. The pro- 
gram possessed sufficient variety to be interesting and was 
rendered with great precision and delicacy, not to say deft- 
ness, of interpretation. The chorus was at all times thor- 
oughly under the control of its conductor, Mr. Phillips, and 
responded instantly to any demand made by him. In the 
matter of volume, cumulative climaxes, crescendos and 
diminuendos no more could be desired. Two features es- 
pecially mark this chorus as different from other organiza- 
tions of like genre; it possesses the ability to vary its tone 
quality and color to suit the mood of the phrase, and owing 
to a remarkably strong alto section, the auditor feels that 
the music really has a foundation, an underpinning, usually 
missed in three and four part chorus performances by 
women's voices. 



The College Greetiiig-s 




The Semi-Chorus deserves commendation for the ex- 
quisite work done in both numbers. The "Barcarolle" had 
to be repeated in response to a most enthusiastic demonstra- 
tion on the part of the audience. It would not do to close 
without mentioning the last two numbers by the Glee Club, 
to-wit, "October" and "Morning Hymn," both of which re^ 
ceived encores. Miss Mildred Weaver, as accompanist, 
gave excellent support to the chorus at all times and 
acquitted herself most creditably in a post that is second 
only, in importance, to that of the conductor. 

By incessant and painstaking work Mr. Phillips has 
built up a superior chorus and the College has reason to be 
proud of its success. 

PROGRAM 

Ashes of Roses Victor Harris 

The Walnut Tree Robert Schumann 

Violin Obbligato by Eleanore Adams 
They met on the Twig of a Chestnut Tree. . .C. C. Robinson 

Glee Club 
Two Evening Songs in Trio Form 

Pastoral Auguste Chapuis 

Evening — Ch. Fred Rungenhagen 

Semi-Chorus 

Song Cycle — "Spring Time" Mable Daniels 

The Awakening 
Apple Blossoms 

Solo and Obbligato by Bess Bannister 
The West Wind and the May 
Spring Heralds 

Glee Club 
Two Boat Songs in Trio Form 

In the Boat Edvard Grieg 

Barcarolle from "The Tales of Hoffmann" 

Jacques Offenbach 
Semi-Chorus 
Summer Night Reinhold L. Herman 



The C o 1 1 e §- e Greetings 



October Albert A. Mack 

Morning Hymn Georg Henschel 

Glee Club 



FROM THE REPORTER'S NOTE-BOOK 

There is one affair during the College year which is 
talked about from September to June, and that is the Easter 
reception, given by Dr. and Mrs. Harker. The reception 
on April 7 was very beautifully carried out in every detail, 
and another Easter reception went down into history to have 
its praises sung even more highly to the new girls of the 
coming year. 

Mr. Loar visited his daughter, Constance, on April 14, 
and talked before the Y. W. Sunday evening. 

In order to help out the Finance Committee of the 
Y. W. C. A. various things have been attempted, but none 
has seemed so successful as the pie sales which have been 
held after morning chapel. 

Mrs. Hartman, Mrs. Colean and Miss Miller of the 
Music Faculty, accompanied by Misses Myrtle Walker, Mil- 
dred Weaver and Letta Irwin attended the concert given by 
the London Symphony Orchestra under the direction of 
Arthur Nikisch, in St. Louis, April 16. 

On the morning of April 15, tTie Geology Class left the 
College with lunch boxes and note books in hand. They 
tramped out to Morgan Lake, then followed the winding 
course of the Mauvaisterre back to civilization. Meanders 
and flood-plains were carefully noted, and no more serious 
accident happened than an unlucky sprawl in the mud. 

Commencement will be Tuesday, June 4, instead of 
Wednesday, June 5. 

Sophomores as well as Suffragettes may enjoy waffles, 
and so on the morning of April 1 the Sophomores break- 




The C o II c g-e Greeting- s 




fasted at the Peacock Inn. The luxury of a morning sleep 

was not the least of the pleasures enjoyed. 

There was great enthusiasm at Chapel on Friday, April 
19, when Dr. Harker checked off eight more squares on the 
Endowment Chart, making $20,000 in all. 

Word has been received from California by Dr. and 
Mrs. Harker of the birth of Elizabeth Ann Riddell, their 
first grand-daughter. 

DEPARTMENT NOTES 

The recitals given by the Seniors in the College of 
Music are well under way, two having been given thus far, 
while a third is scheduled for May 3. 

On Thursday afternoon, April 4, Misses Stella Shuff 
and Lena Hopper, both pupils of Mrs. Hartmann, gave a 
very delightful joint recital. On the following Thursday 
afternoon occurred the recital by Miss Clarissa Garland, a 
Senior in Piano and a pupil of Mr. Donald M. Swarthout, 
and Miss Ruth Stimpson, a Senior in Voice, a pupil of 
Mrs. Hartmann. Miss Stimpson was accompanied by Miss 
Mildred Weaver at the piano. The programs of both 
recitals were well given and the audience manifested their 
appreciation of the work of the young artists in a very 
pleasing manner. 

The resignation of Mr. Phillips from the faculty of the 
College of Music calls forth expressions of the sincerest 
regret. Mr. Phillips has been associated with the college as 
a member of the teaching force for three years, during which 
time his work and zeal for the department has assisted in 
a large measure in the upbuilding of the school. As a 
teacher he has met with great success, his students always 
showing careful and painstaking instruction, while to his 
ability as a chorus director may be attributed the unusually 
fine work of the Glee Club. 
Pa«« Twwty 



The College Greeting's 



Mr. Phillips expects to sail this summer for Europe 
to devote the next few years to hard study, and needless 
to say, the good wishes of a host of friends, both in the 
college and out of it, will go with him. 

The Senior Recitals of the students in Expression have 
aroused much interest and have been well attended, and the 
programs have all been well worth-while because of their 
appreciative interpretation. The first recital was given by 
Miss Beryl Vickery when she read "The Sign of the Cross" ; 
Miss Jeanette Taylor gave "Cape Cod Folks"; Miss Sue 
Fox "In the Palace of the King" ; Miss Mayme Severns, 
"Captain January," and Miss Frances English, "King Rene's 
Daughter." 

On Saturday, April 6, Miss Gray gave a demonstration 
before the Domestic Science Round Table of the Woman's 
Club. Her subject was the selection, preparation, and com- 
parative cost of balanced luncheons. 

The children in the Saturday Cookery Class entertained 
their mothers at an afternoon tea on March 29. This was 
the last lesson for the year. 



SOCIETY NOTES 

The Phi Nu open meeting was given in the Music Hall, 
on Monday night, April 1. The whole program centered 
upon the great movements and questions of the present day 
combined with songs by a Triple Trio, a solo by Jess Mercer, 
and a violin solo by Mildred Weaver. The oration by Celia 
Cathcart on "The Stranger Within Our Gates," was a dis- 
cussion of the immigration question. The school, trade 
unions, and climatic conditions were considered as means 
of Americanizing the immigrants. A very successful colon- 
izing plan, recently tried in the South, was cited as an offset 
to the tendency of foreigners to crowd into cities, one way 
in which the question is becoming increasingly difficult. The 

Pace Tw«&t7-<m« 



1 h e College Greetings 




responsibility rests upon the citizens of today, as American 
children of European parents. The time for action is not 
in the future, but now, while the mass of men is yet a huge 
lump of clay in the hands of the artist, a lump pregnant 
with possibilities for America and for Americans. 

Helen Moore gave us a deeper appreciation and love 
for Van Dyke's poetical ability by reading some of his 
poems which brought to us his wonderful power in making 
us feel his love for humanity, his wonderful uniting of 
idealism and realism, his love of Nature joined with that 
of God, and his profound reverence for all things high and 
noble. 

In the paper on "The Awakening of the Dragon," by 
Feme Reid, the former inactivity of China was attributed 
partly to the teachings of Confucius and partly to the 
oppression of the Manchus. The present great awakening 
was traced industrially and educationally to its climax in 
the establishment of the Chinese Republic. Then, in a lighter 
vein but no less interesting was the original, illustrated 
poem by Feril Hess on "Her First Year at College." 



The Belles Lettres Society gave their Annual Open 
Meeting Monday evening, April 23. 

The first number on the program was a piano solo by 
Miss Mary Ebert. She played "Waldesrauschen, Concert 
Etude No. 1, by Liszt, and her interpretation was most 
sympathetic and artistic. 

Miss Janette Powell gave an oration on Count Leo 
Tolstoy, handling her subject well, and showing a wide and 
comprehensive grasp of the situation in Russia. Miss Helen 
Harrison read a clever and interesting story dealing with 
the experiences of a Russian and his servant. Miss Mona 
Summers followed with an essay on "The Awakening of 
Russia." Since the Society has been studying some phases 
of Russian life and literature in its work of this year, this 



The C o 1 1 e §■ c Greeting's 





added information was to all doubly suggestive and inter- 
esting. 

Miss Helen Jones sang three very pretty songs with 
sympathy and understanding. 

A reading from Booth Tarkington was given by Miss 
Severns in a bright and attractive way, showing especially 
good characterization work. The last number on the pro- 
gram was a Double Trio, and they sang two numbers, "The 
Call" by Mark Andrews and "Indian Cradle Song" by 
Alexander Matthews. 

Belles Lettres is rejoicing over a new piece of statuary 
for her hall, a Venus de Milo, given by the members of the 
Academy Society. 

To the children who helped in the play, "A Doll's 
House," Belles Lettres also wishes to acknowledge their 
indebtedness and thanks. 



ALUMNA NOTES 

The annual reunion of alumnae and former students 
will be held on Monday, June 3. At 3 o'clock in the after- 
noon the annual meeting will be held when matters of un- 
usual importance will be presented. At the close of the 
session a reception will be held by the Belles Lettres and 
Phi Nu Societies in their halls. 

Now is the time when L W. C.'s who have received 
their diplomas or degrees from President Harker's hand 
should get busy and see that the fund of $5,000 being raised 
in his honor should take a sudden growth from the mark 
where it has rested for so many months and rise to loftier 
proportions. If you expect to be proud and happy when 
you hear the annual report of the fund, you will have to be 
sure that many gifts find their way immediately to the treas- 
urer of the scholarship funds, Mrs. Jennie Kinman Ward, 
413 North Church St. 

Page Twenty-tliree 



SBxamaaammBKmm 




The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 



The Illinois Woman's College Guild, recently organ- 
ized, met in Harker Hall on Saturday afternoon, April 27, 
with Mrs. E. C. Carpenter the presiding officer, and Miss 
Janette C. Powell the Recorder. 

The membership of the Guild includes not only alum- 
nae, but also former students and friends who wish to co- 
operate in the work of the Guild. It is hoped that this 
organization may awaken and develop a more active interest 
m the I. W. C. plans for advancement, and may bring the 
cominunity into a fuller knowledge of the work in the vari- 
ous departments of the College. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF TREASURER OF 
COLLEGE GREETINGS 

RECEIPTS 

On hand at first of year $ 45.00 

Received from Subscriptions 172.50 

Received from Advertisements 393- 50 

Received for Extra Copies 2.10 

Total $613.10 

EXPENDITURES 

Stamps $ 2.34 

Stationery 5.05 

Postals .50 

Printing 31300 

Office Furnishing 32.00 

Total $352.89 

Receipts, $613.10 
Expenditures, 352.89 
Balance, 260.21 
Probable Expenditures for May and June .... $92.00 



Page Twenty-^our 



GEO. T. DOUGLAS 

FANCY GROCERIES 
234 West State St. 738 E. North St. 



A LITTLE BOY'S LOGIC 



Joseph Heinl & Sons 

FLORISTS 
Jacksonville, III. Both Phones 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 



DR. KOPPERL 

Dentist 

326 w. state St. 



SHOES 



We invite you to come to our 

store and look over a line 

of shoes that are rig-ht 

W. T. REAUGH 

Fashionable Footwear 
South Side Sq. 



Dr. Albyn Lincoln Adams 

Oculist and Aurist to 

School for the Blind 

323 W. State St. 

Practice limited to diseases of 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 


Dr. R. R. BUCKTHORPE 
Dentist 

( 111. House 1054. 
Phones K Bell. Office 512. 
1 111. Office 750. 

Over Hatch Drug Store 

Jacksonville, 111. 

m 




DKNNIS SCHRAM 

Jeweler 

College Pins, Spoons, Etc. 

South Side Square 
JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 


DR. CARL E. BLACK 

Office— 349 E. State St. 
Telephone, either line, No. 85. 

Resideuce — 1305 West State Street 

Telephone, either line, No. 285 
Surgery — Passavant Memorial Hospit- 
al and Our Savior's Hospital 
Hospital Hours — 9 a. m. to 12 m. 
Office Hours — 1:30 to 4 p. m. Even- 
ings and Sundays by appointment 


BARGAIN BOOK STORE 

West State Street 


Wmum HlllR DRESSER 

I am prepared to manufacture hair 
combings in the latest style. Sham- 
pooing and scalp massage done by ap- 
pointment at your residence. 

FLORENCE KIRK KING 

503 W. College^St. 111. Phone 837 



F. J. WADDELL & CO. 

Suits, Coats, Costumes, Skirts, Waists, Corsets 

Muslin Underwear, Gloves, Hosiery 

Novelties and Newest Models 

Shown always at moderate prices 



"Long- years ag-o", when the little boy of four was a 
baby of two, he was displaying- his blocks to a diminutive 
g"uest, and taking" one block long-er than the others from 
the pile, he said '''Is is Miss Johnston." 



DRESSY LOW SHOES 

We are showing low shoe styles of 
the prevailing cuts and materials, 
adapted espacially for young people's 
wants. 

Make your selections early. 

H O F=» F=» E F=R © 

We Repair Shoes 




VIeTrIt^eI 

Jacksonvilles Largest Mens' Store 

Pennants and Banners 

V. C. and Fraternity special designs 

Manish Cut Sweater Coats 
Hand Bag's, Trunks 
and Suit Cases 



McCUIvLOUGH BROS. 

Professional 
Photog-raphers 

HockenhuU Bldg. 




Andre & Andre 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS OF QUALITY 

When you think of Furnishing"s for 

the Home or Office 

THINK OF US 

48-50 North Side Square 



The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital . . . $200,000 
Surplus . . . 20,000 

Deposits . . . 1,100,000 
U. S. Depository for Postal Savings Bank 
Julius U. Strawn, President 
Miller Weir, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear, H.J. Rog- 
ers, A- A. Curry, C. B. Graff 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



We make a specialty of catering to I. W. C. students 
We also make nice Birthday Cakes with dates and ini- 
itials and delicious new Sundaes which college girls 
appreciate so much. 
Phone us your wants and we will deliver same to college 
Let us furnish you an estimate on your next class recep- 
tion or social function of any kind. 
We have both phones. No. 227 

VICKERY & MEiRRIGAN 
Caterers 527 West State St. 



PACIFIC HOTEL 

H. Poulk J. B. Sneli 
Proprietors 

JACKSONVII^LK, Il,I,INOIS 



Special Offer to Students! 

Any of my ^5, $6, $'] and $8 Carbon 
or Platinum Photos, cabinet size 

3 for $1.00 

NOT GOOD AFTER MAY 1st 

Only 3 at this price to a student 

Special Rates on other sizes 

McDougall's Studio 

West State Street 



Passing" through the dining- room one day, by the west 
windows, clad in coat and hat, one girl could not resist 
saying, "Men do not wear their hats in the house, do 
they?" just to see what answer would be forthcoming. 
As though flashed from a gun came the immediate re- 
sponse: "Yes, but I am doing out doahs, you see." 



"ROBERTS' for QUALITY" 

Is not a mere phrase. It is the foundation of our success 
and reputation and our aim for the future. 

ROBERTS BROTHERS 

HIGH GRADE GROCERY AND PHARMACY 

DKLIVERY SERVICE PHONE 800 



VISIT 



EH N IBS' 



FOR 



FRESH HOME MADE CANDY 

Pure Ice Cream and Soda Water 

Fine Box Chocolates 

216 EAST STATE ST. 



Matliis, Kamm & Shibe Say 

We can furnisli your 

Shoes and Party Slippers 

in the popular styles 

leathers, and 

fabrics 


J. P. BROWN 

Sheet Music and Musical 

Merchandise 

Talking Machines and Supplies 

Mail Orders Solicited 

S. W. Cor, Square 


Coming in one day recently, with his hands full of 
spring" flowers plucked from the campus, he held them 
up for inspection. 

'*What flowers, are those?" was asked. 

"Why, they ah daniel-lions, didn't you know?" 


JOHN K. LONG 

Job Printing" 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 

Loose Leaf Note Books 

Illinois Phone 400 

no North West St. 


Hillerby's 

Dry Goods Store 

Safest Place 
to Trade 


Dlil ill 

ALL KINDS OF FRESH and 

SALT MEATS, FISH, 

POULTRY, ETC. 

Both Phones 196 230 W. State St. 


Ask your gfrocer for 

HOI.SUM 

BREAD 

Made clean. Delivered clean 
in waxed paper wrappers 



MONTGOMERY & DEPPE'S 

Everything in Dry Goods — Well Lighted 
first floor cloak and suit room 

Agents for Ladies Home Journal Patterns 
The new "Howd" front laced corsets 


A g"irl standing' in her room at an open front window 
called to him on the pavement below. A member of the 
faculty said quite seriously, "What shall we do to Mary 
for talking- to you out of the window?" 

"I sink 5'ou had bettah move her room, — move her over 
to Harker Hall," said our young- diplomat. 


SNERLY & TAYLOR 
Select Groceries 

221 West state Street 


Cloaks. Smrs.Fims amdMilunery^ 


Established 1890 

Low Prices, Square Dealing- 
Keep us busy 


GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 


Illinois Phone 57 Bell Phone 92 

Fresh Drug-s, Fancy Goods, 

Stationery 

THE 
BADGER DRUG STORE 

2 doors West of Postoffice 
235 E. State Street. 



SKIRT BOXES 

ROCKERS, SCREENS, DESKS 

AND BED ROOM CURTAINS 

AT 

JOHNSON, HACKETT & GUTHRIE'S 



In September: "Deh comes Louise." 

"You must say Miss Miller this year." 

"After a few moment's reflection: — "Well, if she was 
Louise last yeah, and she's Miss Millah now, what was 
she in the summah?" 



F. E. Farrell E. E. Crabtree 

Established 1865 

F. G. PARRELL & CO. 

BANKERS 

Successors to First National Bank 

Jacksonville, 111. 



C. S. MARTIN 

Fine Pictures — Artistic Framing 

Frames and Ovals of all 

descriptions and sizes 

314 W. State St., Scott Block 

Jacksonville, 111. 




Frank Elliott, Pres. Wm. R. Routt, V.-Pres. 

C. A. Johnson, Vice-Pres. 

J. Weir Elliott, Cashier 

J. AUerton Palmer, Asst. Cashier 

ELLIOTT STATE BANK 

Jacksonville, 111. 
Capital $150,000 

Undivided Profits $ 12,000 

DIRECTORS 
Frank Elliott Frank R. Elliott 

J. Weir Elliott John A. Bellatti 

Wm. R. Routt C. A. Johnson 

Wm. S. Elliott 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING 

for the latest in Suits, Ladies' Underwear, Ribbons, 

Laces, Embroidery Materials or Notions 

Visit the store that carries the 

up to date merchandise 

PHELPS Sl OSBORNE 



CHAS. M. HOPPER 
Dentist 

2ii S. Side Square 



COOK 

LIGHT with GAS 

HEAT 

Jacksonville Railway & 
Light Company 

224 South Maiu Street 



Brady Brothers 

Hardware, Cutlery 
Paints 



Fancy Toilets 



Christmas Goods 



COOVER Sl SHREVE'S 
Drug Store 

Kodaks and Supplies 

Developtng and Finishing 



E. W. BASSETT 

Copper and Brass Goods, Desk Clocks, Desk Sets, Chaf 
ing Dishes, Percolators, Alcohol Stoves, Kettles. 

COLLEGE AND SOCIETY STATIONERY 

SPECIAL SOCIETY ENGRAVING 

DONE TO ORDER 

Kodak Supplies Amateur Finishin 

21 South Side Square 



"How many Georges do you know?" 
"One, two, free." 
"Who are they?" 

"I'm -Georg-e, and your black George, and 'Weah 
Marchin' fru Georg-aii'." 



A BARGAIN 
IN STATIONERY 

78 Sheets of Linen Paper 
and 50 Envelopes to match 

all for 25c 

Armstrongs Drug Store 

The Quality Store 
Southwest Corner Square 



A. L. BROMLEY 
TAILOR 

315 W. State St. 111. Phone 169 

Suits, Coats and Skirts 

made to order by expert tailors 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dying 

and alterations of all kinds 

Special rates to students 

Work called for and delivered promptly. 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 
Fancy Bazaar and Millinery 

211 West state Street 



I DO 

Kodak Finishing 
Bromide enlarging 
Flashlights 
and Views 

CLAUDE B. VAIL 

Oswald's Drug Store, 71 E. SideSquar 

Residence Phone, 111. 1493 



The most dainty thing-s in Rings and Jewelry. New 

and handsome styles of goods in Sterling- Siver. 

Hig"hest grades of Cut Glass, and every [description 

of Spectacles and lOye Glasses 

Fine Diamonds a Speciality 

at 

RUSSBLIv & LYON'S 

West Side Square 
Both Phones 96 



He had been given a chocolate cream, and the donor 
decided it was too large, and said "You had better share 
that, had you not?" 

"What does 'share' mean?" asked the boy, and it was 
carefully explained. He then went over to the box of 



E). A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 E. State St. Jacksonville, 111. 
Illinois Telephone 388 



i^adies' High Grade, Late Style 
FUR SCARFS and MUFFS 



ARK SOI.D BY 



Frank Byrns 



Mott Reasonable Prices 



College Girls are invited to take 
a dvantage of the rescnrces cl this 
store for supplying their needs in 
the dry goods line. Dress Goods, 
Silks, Ribbons, Laces, Handker- 
chiefs, ets. are to be had here in 
attractive patterns at poplar prices. 




HOCKENHULL Bu>C^ JACKSONVILLE, iu. 



"A DE)IvIGHTFUIv RIDE^' 
This will always be the cry 
if the rig" came from 

che:rry's 

Horses are fine travelers but 
gentle and safe. 

All equipag-e the finest 
Call either phone 

che)rry's livery 



pboto portrattute 
OXTCD ©F=»iE:-rH 

Successor to 
The Watson Studio 

Southwest Corner Square 



chocolates on the table. "What are you g-oing- to do 
with those?" asked the hostess. 

"I am gfoiug" to share them," he replied. 



We always have 

The Latest Novelties 

for Young Women 

We have made our success by 

anticipating- 

Correct Styles for each season 

KVKNiNG Slippers 

JAMES McGINNIS & CO. 

62 E^st Side Square 



Desig-ns, Cut Flowers 
Plants 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

Store: Pell Phone 154, 111. 182 

Greehouses, Bell 775 



One block east of College 

HERE TO PLEASE 

Candies, Cakes, Cookies, Pies 

Sandwiches, Pop on Ice, 

Groceries, 

California Fruits, 

School Supplies 



GIRLS: Come and visit me 
at my little Hat Shop. I 
g"ive especial attention and 
prices to collegfe g^irls. 

DORA P. ROBINSON 

537 South Diamond Street 



Zbc College Greetinos 

fjfThe College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 
<[fContributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month- 

l}f Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies 15c. 
fjjEntered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 



Contents 

Editorial .3 

Dr. Barker's Address to the Class of 1912 4 

The Awakening of the Dragon 6 

May Day 15 

The May Breakfast 16 

Wesley Mathers Contests .17 

Commencement Events 18 

The Academy Commencement 18 

Expression Recital 18 

Art Exhibit 19 

Exhibit of the School of Home Economics 19 

Sunday Services 20 

Baccalaureate Address 20 

Class Day 20 

Alumnae Meeting 21 

Commencement Recital 22 

Commencement Day 23 



"Hot midsummer's petted crone, 
Sweet to me thy drowsy tone, 
Tells of countless sunny hours. 
Long days and solid banks of flowers; 
Of gulfs of sweetness without bound, 
In Indian wildernesses found; 
* Of Syrian peace, immortal leisure, 
Firmest cheer and bird-like pleasure." 



— Emerson. 



^be College (greetingg 

Vol. XV. Jacksonville, 111., June, 1912 No. 8 

Faculty Committee — Miss Weaver, Miss Tanner, Miss Cowgill 
Editor — Janette C. Powell 

Associate Editors — Louise Gates, Helen Moore, Edith I^yles 
Business Managers — Annette Rearick, Myrtle Walker, Marian 
Ivombard. 



From registration days to commencement seemed, last 
September, a stretch interminable ; June 5 seemed a date 
so far removed in the hazy distance that we reckoned 
upon it but little in our college calendar. In reality, how 
short it has been ! Busy days have shortened weeks and 
months until now good-byes are said with a reluctance 
before deemed impossible. 

In common with other leave-takers the Greetings 
staff discontinues its work with not a little regret. True, 
there have been many problems to meet, much material to 
find, many mistakes to rectify ; but there have been corre- 
sponding compensations that have made the Greetings 
work a most happy occupation. 

A word of thanks is due all that have given their 
support to the making of the magazine, either as sub- 
scribers or as contributors. Their interest and hearty 
co-operation have materially assisted the staff in its en- 
deavor to make the paper reflect the interest and loyalty 
of college spirit. It is with sincere appreciation that we 
acknowledge such co-operation. 

To the incoming staff we extend the heartiest good 
wishes for pleasure and success in the making of a college 
paper that will reflect the highest and best of college 
ideals. 

Page Three 




The C o 1 1 e g" t G r e e t i n g" s 



DR. BARKER'S ADDRESS TO CLASS OF 1912 

Young Women of the Graduating Class: You are 
experiencing now a kind of enjoyment that comes to 
comparatively few in life. You have completed your 
college course and have finished the task set before you; 
and there now comes to you the joy of achievement, the 
"well done" of your teachers, and the honorable recogni- 
tion which the world delights to give to all who have suc- 
ceeded. We welcome you into the ranks of Woman's 
college alumnae, a most honorable band, now numbering 
more than a thousand ; and we give you credentials which 
will admit you to all the rights and privileges of those 
advanced to the same rank here and everywhere. We 
congratulate you, and rejoice with you. 

But as you thus stand on the threshold of the col- 
lege, to go into the more general and larger life of the 
world, let me remind you that what is happening here 
now is not the rule of life, but rather its exception. The 
rule of life is not the course completed, not the task 
finished, not the journey ended. There is a glory in the 
completed course; but, rightly seen, there is a greater 
glory still reserved in some course which God marks out 
for us, so comprehensive that its completion reaches away 
beyond our years, however prolonged, into the unseen 
vista of eternity. 

This must be so, or life would hardly be worth living. 
Our time is so short here, our strength so small, that any 
tasks we can complete, must be little tasks; any ideal 
we can here attain must be a comparatively low ideal; 
any course we can wholly master must be very limited 
indeed. And God, who orders our lives, and all lives, 
has greater tasks whose completion requires the co-opera- 
tion of thousands of His noblest. He sets us at our part, 
and we labor on, and fall at our post, the task still uncom- 
pleted. Other workmen take up our tools, but God's 
great work goes on to its accomplishment. 

Page Four 



The College Greetings 



S^ 



The greater truth is, that God's greatest workmen 
seldom complete their work; God's greatest heroes sel- 
dom see the victory in their wars. Abraham, Isaac and 
Jacob never found the city which they sought. Moses 
never entered Canaan. Joshua did not conquer the 
Canaanitish tribes. In the eleventh chapter of Hebrews, 
where the roll of honor of Old Testament heroes is called, 
the record is that every one died in faith, not having 
received the promise. Not one of them seemed to finish 
his task, or to receive his reward ; but labored and strove 
to the very end, and then laid down his work unfinished 
in disappointment and apparent defeat, for some one 
else to take up and complete. 

And the same is true for all God's New Testament 
heroes, even up to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 
The men and women who built this Woman's college had 
the visio .; theirs was the duty and the toil and the sac- 
rifice ; but they too died, not having realized the promise. 
God gives to a father and a mother the ideal of the 
family, and they begin their home in the joy and en- 
thusiasm of youth and love; but frequently the years go 
by, and at the end with broken hearts they bend in tears 
over the graves of their hopes. He calls His heroes in to 
the battle for righteousness in city and state and nation, 
and they enter into it bravely, and fight a good fight 
manfully, but they die fighting, and do not receive here 
a victor's crown. They, too, die in faith, not having 
realized the promises. 

Let us not think then that the laurel wreath or the 
victor's crown, or the applause of friends are the signs 
oi: life's successes. God's greatest tasks are the unfin- 
ished tasks. His greatest heroes are the uncrowned 
heroes. Let us not be elated if He calls us to short courses 
that are easily completed; or to little tasks that are over 
and done in a few brief years. Let us rather rejoice if 
He calls us to be laborers together with Him in some 

Page Five 




The C o I I e S!' t G r e e t i n sr s 



plan which reaches beyond both our vision and our years. 
Let us be glad now if we may be done with things about 
which we clap our hands tomorrow that they are com- 
pleted. But let us rather ask Him to try us with some- 
thing worth while in life and character for the genera- 
tions that are to follow us, something that will keep us 
ever growing to keep up with its growth, and something 
that will reach over into all the coming years. 

Let us pray that we may be counted worthy to dig 
wells out of which we may not drink, and to plant 
orchards of whose fruit we may not eat. that we 
might rise to the sublime height of the Psalmist when 
he prays that God's work may appear unto him, and that 
the glory of the work may be reserved for his children. 

Young women, my heart's desire for you and for 
myself tonight is, that with such a vision of life's work 
before us, we may take up its daily round of duty and 
labor on in patience to the end, with courage unabated, 
with zeal undiminished, having our joy in the work itself, 
not thinking over much about life's baccalaureates. 
Happy will it be for us if we are counted worthy to labor 
and to wait, happy even if need be to die in faith not 
having realized the promises, and perfectly content to 
wait for our reward until we see Him face to face; pro- 
vided only that we are faithful to His daily grace, and 
diligently active in fulfilling every duty which He assigns. 



(THE PRIZE ESSAY) 

THE AWAKENING OF THE DRAGON. 

Within the last year, the nations have witnessed a 
history making event of more than continental impor- 
tance. China, the great sleeping Empire of the East, has 
thrown off the lethargy of two thousand years of sleep. 
At last, the old dragon has awakened, with a stretch and 
a yawn, that has made the whole world wonder. To those, 

Page Six 



m 


u 


The C 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 

> c 


m 



who have been watching the gradual reforms that have 
been crowding out ancient customs for the last quarter of 
the nineteenth century, this awakening was not entirely 
unexpected. To the general public, however, it was a 
startling revelation. When we consider the fact that, for 
centuries upon centuries, there has been no apparent 
advancement in the civilization that was at its best in the 
time of Confucius, it is not surprising that the sudden 
overthrow of traditions has caused world-wide amaze- 
ment. 

China's ancient civilization has been her pride and 
boast. It delighted her to think that, while other nations 
were in a state of chaos and barbarism, her own had 
attained a high degree of national culture. They had 
invented the mariner's compass and had put it into prac- 
tical use long before European nations had any knowledge 
of the instrument. Blockprinting and gun-powder, too, 
were her discoveries. Poets and musicians thronged the 
royal palace. Philosophers and sages went about teaching 
their doctrines. Brilliant as was this beginning and hope- 
ful as were the prospects for a far-reaching civilization, 
the ambitious effort died out almost before it had begun. 
The year 220 B. C. saw its decline. 

From this time until 1840, Chiija has been practically 
devoid of progress either in arts or in institutions. The 
amalgamation with the Tartars and the wandering shep- 
herds of Tibet, tribes from the North and West, seem to 
account in part for this stagnation. They, peoples of 
low civilization and no culture, had nothing that China 
would stoop to adopt. The country became more and 
more self-centered. The idea that she was a supreme 
country, that hers was a chosen people, permeated the 
ancient literature of China. They felt no need of inter- 
course with people who were so many years behind them, 
for indeed, China was enjoying a civilization much further 

Page Seveu 



The C o I I e §■ e Greeting's 



advanced at the beginning of the Christian era than was 
Europe in feudal times. Their very self-conduct, how- 
ever, had the most natural result in the stupor of two 
thousand years. 

Even more than this national arrogance and self- 
satisfaction, the teachings of Confucius have retarded the 
growth of China. Until recently, but few of the many 
millions of China would disagree with the school-boy in 
his chant. 

Confucius ! Confucius ! How great was Confucius ! 

Before him there was no Confucius, 

Since him there has been no other, 

Confucius ! Confucius ! How great was Confucius ! 

Throughout many centuries, have the teachings of 
this philosopher lasted. In fact, until very recently, they 
have retained their hold on the majority of the Chinese 
people. The conservatism of his doctrines have favored 
royal power and have kept the people in awe of the 
sovereign. Not only was free thinking forbidden, but 
horrible deaths were perpetrated on offenders. As a result 
of the narrowness of the dictatorial sage, son succeeded 
father in his profession or trade. There was no oppor- 
tunity for him to rise above his station. His first duty 
was to his father. This same unconditional filial obedi- 
ence manifested itself in early marriages and in extreme 
poverty. 

Great as were the influences of the philosopher upon 
the civilization of China and far-reaching as were its 
effects, it is to the Manchu dynasty that we attribute the 
main causes for the restlessness which has but lately come 
to its climax. The year 1644 marked the beginning of 
the Manchu dynasty. The Manchurians, a bold and hardy 
race who settled in the valley of the Hurka river, had by 
numerous victories increased their dominions to such a 
degree that they were by no means to be lightly consid- 
Page Eight 



The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 



ered by their neighbors, the Chinese. When, in 1616, they 
led an army against the Chinese, they put to rout the 
forces that met them. Gaining the province of Liao-tung, 
three years later, they made Tien-ming the sovereign of 
the province. Gradually, in the years that followed, the 
Manchus gained power, while just as surely the Chinese 
became weaker and weaker through devastation and 
destruction, the work of rebel bands. Finally, in 1644, 
Peking was taken ; Tien-ming was proclaimed the emperor 
of China, and thus the Empire passed under foreign yoke. 

Torn by internal dissension, subjected to the tyranny 
of the Manchus, China was an Empire of seething unrest. 
Many of the Manchu kings were voluptuous and corrupt. 
Giving themselves entirely to their own pleasures, they 
paid no attention to repeated cries for reforms. One 
attempt after another was made to free the Chinese people 
from the galling yoke of the Manchus. Rebellions broke 
out in the northern provinces, and pirates besieged the 
coast. The little hope that Tao-kwang who ascended the 
throne in 1820 had inspired, came to nothing. When his 
son Hien-feng succeeded him, the people demanded re- 
forms that Tao-kwang had promised. Their requests 
ignored, the people inaugurated a rebellion under the 
leadership of Tien-te, the last representative of the Ming 
dynasty. The struggle continued for some time without 
success until a new leader was found in Hung Sui-tsuan. 
This rebellion, which was known as the Tai-ping rebellion, 
had a duration of twelve years. The hope for freedom 
was very bright , for about the same time, Great Britain 
had declared war against the Manchu dynasty and under 
the double pressure it seemed doubtful whether it could 
keep its ground. At this time the rebellion was stronger, 
more determined but as heretofore it was ultimately 
crushed and the cruel oppression once more held sway. 

From 1875 the history of China shows an increasing 

Page Nin^ 




The College Greetings 



restlessness. Clearly the reason for this spirit of unrest 
is to be found in China's contact with other nations. The 
introduction of the telegraph in 1881 and the admission 
of steamers into the harbors of China in 1899 made pos- 
sible intercourse with the foremost nations of the world. 
Where before, there had been a mere handful, now scores 
of missionaries flocked to China. It is the missionary, 
both pioneer and modern, that we have to thank for a 
great part in the wonderful awakening of China. Not 
only in broadening the ideals of the people in religious 
matters, but also in putting new life into the industrial 
world, has the missionary been a potent factor. Slow as 
were the first degrees of improvement, so great has been 
its impetus received that the movement did not stop half- 
way. There are now factories for the production of silk 
and cotton cloth, for flour and paper. Mines, in which 
boundless sources of wealth long lay idle, are now pouring 
forth their opulence. Again, the output of the Hanyang 
Iron Mills, six hundred miles up the Yangtze River from 
Shaighai, are being shipped through the isthmus of Suez 
and landed in Brooklyn, there to compete with the prod- 
ucts of our Pennsylvania mines. Shanghai, only a few 
years ago, little more than a river village, has now a ton- 
nage harbor next to that of Liverpool. In 1875, there 
were only two hundred miles of railway; today, four 
thousand, one hundred and seven miles carry her traffic. 
More than this, nine thousand miles are in prospect. Dis- 
tance, is then, no longer a barrier to traveling. The jour- 
ney from Peking to Hankow, once made with difficulty 
in forty days by Chinese carts, can now be made in thirty- 
six hours on the finest trains. While a comparatively 
short time ago, there were no modern postoffices, China 
today boasts three thousand five hundred. 

One of the greatest proofs of China's onward march 
in social and moral progress is her persistent efforts to 
Page Ten 




The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 



stamp out the opium evil, the awful scourge of her people. 
As early as 1729, an edict was issued, forbidding the use 
of the drug, but like many of the edicts of the Empire, it 
was completely disregarded. In 1906, the culmination of 
a struggle lasting for centuries came in another anti- 
opium decree. This time the decree was what the people 
demanded, as they have since shown. A veritable crusade 
against the evil has been inaugurated. Into the move- 
ment, men of high position have thrown themselves, heart 
and soul. Anti-opium societies have been formed; raids 
have been made on opium dens with amazing success. 
Thousands of these evil resorts have been wiped out of 
existence. Significant is the fact that the greatest part 
of the work in this war has been done by the Chinese 
themselves. In the light of this fact, it is indeed a tragedy 
that importation of the drug from India through Great 
Britain must continually check their march, when victory 
is almost within their grasp. 

Even more powerful than the influence exerted by 
the missionaries in industrial and social conditions, has 
been the effect they have produced upon the education 
of modern China. Western learning they brought to the 
country that the people might see its value. It was by 
their constant efforts and painstaking toil, that a place 
was made for the marvelous reform now sweeping over 
the land. The first impetus in this movement took place 
about the middle of the nineteenth century, when a dele- 
gation of one hundred and twenty students was sent from 
China to the universities of America. The very eagerness 
for learning evinced by these students, however, achieved 
their downfall. Soon reports were sent back to China 
that her sons were adopting the dress and manners of the 
Western world. More alarming still was the rumor that 
some were even going so far as to adopt the Western 
religion. Immediately, the appropriation for their ex- 
Page Eleyen 



The C o I I e §■ e Greetings 



penses was withdrawn and they were peremptorily or- 
dered home. Instead of being welcomed on their arrival 
in China, instead of being given places of honor, they 
were scorned. Refused official appointments, they were 
compelled to make their living by private enterprise. 
Notwithstanding this fact, these students forced to return 
to China after only a short season of opportunity, were 
one of the most powerful factors in the promotion of the- 
present great movement in behalf of education. Today, 
they have the respect of all classes. They are honored 
and influential citizens. 

For over forty years after the return of the members 
of this delegation, practically no students were sent to 
America. Finally, however, China could no longer with- 
stand the influence that the contact with the outside 
world was pressing upon her. In September, 1901, the 
government issued two most important edicts. The first 
commanded that all existing colleges be converted into 
schools of Western learning. As the province of Chili 
had its university at Peking, so each of the other provinces 
must have its university. The following year, in accord- 
ance with this decree, thirteen colleges were established 
in ten different provinces. The second edict ordered that 
a number of young men of scholastic ability should each 
year be sent abroad to the great universities, young men 
who should, upon their return, place their increased 
knowledge at the service of the Empire. 

The remission of the thirteen million dollars indem- 
nity paid to the United States by China after the Boxer 
rebellion, proved a diplomatic move on the part of Con- 
gress, for in appreciation of this, China has sent many of 
these chosen students to our universities. To America, 
China is sending one hundred students a year for five 
years and after that she promises to send fifty students 
a year for twenty-nine years. The Chinese student that 
Page Twelve 




The C o 1 1 e g- e Greeting's 



would go to America must first pass a competitive exam- 
ination held at Peking in the summer. Thorough tests 
are given not only in Chinese literature but also in English 
literature, in science, history and mathematics. The rep- 
resentatives of the yellow race in our colleges are pas- 
sionately loyal to their country and eager to make the 
most possible out of their college training here. Young 
men of great scholastic ability, they compete very favor- 
ably with Americans for the highest honors awarded to 
students. For instance, within the last two years, two 
Chinese students from Harvard and two from Yale have 
been elected to the Phi Beta Kappa Society. They have 
moreover, taken numerous prizes for their excellence in 
oratory. In one respect only, do they measure below the 
standard. In athletics, they have fallen short of the mark 
because of their lack of early training. As all the col- 
leges of China have their equipment for athletics and 
every college has its teams, the next generation will not 
be so handicapped as is the present. 

Not alone in schools and colleges has China advanced ; 
the increase of her educational outlook is evident also 
in the number of public lecture rooms and local clubs. 
The past few years, moreover, have seen marvelous in- 
crease in the quantity and quality of magazines and peri- 
odicals. Of greater significance still is the fact that many 
books have been translated and published in the Chinese 
language. 

Education, in fact, has long been the only hope of 
the thinkers of the Empire. By it alone, have they 
dreamed of casting off the rule of the Manchus. They 
recognized the fact that never, so long as the Chinese 
race remained under the shadow of ignorance and super- 
stition, could it hope to throw off its burden and stand 
among the nations. To one of these thinkers, the people 
of China owe a debt that can never be paid. Doctor Sun 

Page Thirteen 




The College Greetings 



Yat Sen, a Yale graduate, a Christian gentleman of refine- 
ment and culture, is largely responsible for the revolu- 
tionary feeling. For the past decade, with other stu- 
dents, he has been preaching revolutionary doctrines in 
all parts of the country. To willing listeners the message 
has come. The spirit of rebellion was everywhere. The 
only need was capable and intelligent leaders to guide 
the people. When those men were found, the only pos- 
sible result followed. On the tenth of October, 1911, at 
Wuchang, the revolution broke out in earnest. Like 
fire in a field of dry grass, it spread throughout the coun- 
try and within two weeks, fourteen of the eighteen prov- 
inces joined forces with the revolutionists. With General 
Li Yuan Heng as leader of the revolution forces and 
Yuan Shih-kai, both Prime Minister and leader of the 
Imperialist forces, a few battles were fought with inde- 
cisive results. Then, an armistice was declared until the 
peace conference should meet at Shanghai. Prince Chun, 
the regent and father of the baby Emperor, abdicated on 
December 6. Two statesmen, one a Manchu, one a Chi- 
nese, were appointed as guardians for the child. In Nank- 
ing, the stronghold of the revolutionists. Dr. Sun was 
elected President of the Chinese republic. The following 
day, the peace conference at Shanghai decided that a 
national convention should be held to determine the form 
of government. From the beginning of the year, the tide 
of popular opinion, steered by revolutionists and imperial- 
ists alike, has swept everything before it in favor of peace 
at any cost. The generals of the Imperial army demanded 
that the government should arrange the troubled affairs 
of the country peaceably, even at the expense of abdics^,- 
tion. Accordingly on the fourth of February, the Dow-^ 
ager Empress in behalf of Emperor Pi Yi gave Yuan Shi- ^tj; 
Kai full power to negotiate with the revolutionists at 
Nanking. Eight days later with the abdication of the 

Page Foureeen 



The C o 1 1 e g- e Greetings 



emperor, Manchu rule came to an end. For the President 
of the Eepublie, Dr. Sun had been the choice of the people. 

His resignation of that high office in favor of Yuan 
Shi-Kai was an act of unparalleled magnanimity. After 
years of unremitting toil, with the establishment of a 
republic as his goal, he gave up his seat of honor to one 
whom he considered better fitted to guide the ship of 
state through the stormy seas of the republic. That Yuan 
is an Imperialist is true, but it is of more importance 
that he is a man of sober opinion and clear judgment. It 
is not, he declares, the interests of the Republicans or 
Imperialists that he has at heart, but the larger interests 
of the Chinese people. 

As yet, conditions are still unsettled but one fact re- 
mains, China has awakened. Economically, socially, and 
politically, she has thrown off the bonds of two thou- 
sand years of inactivity. Four hundred million souls 
are awakening to the demands of the present. They are 
beginning to forget their superstition and, instead of 
living in the past, they are beginning to realize the need 
of living in the present. Long have they been in respond- 
ing to the call of the outside world, but now the response 
has been made, it is not feeble or half-hearted. It is the 
heart and soul answer of a people to whom liberty was 
so long denied, of a people who now have their goal in 
sight, the goal — personal and political freedom. 

— F. R. '14. 

MAY DAY. 

On Tuesday afternoon. May 14, at six o'clock, oc- 
curred one of the prettiest May parties ever witnessed 
on our I. W. C. campus. 

The first event was the grand march in which half 
the girls wore yellow chrysanthemums in their hair and 
half blue, thus carying out the college color scheme. 

Page Fifteen, 




The C o 1 1 e g- 1 Greeting's 



At the close of the march the girls formed in a double 
line and knelt while the Queen's party passed through. 

First came the trumpeter, Mildred Weaver, followed 
by the six little flower girls. After the flower girls came 
the pages wearing pink and blue capes and plumes. 

Then came the Maid of Honor, Helen Moore, dressed 
in white, and carrying a muff of roses and lilies of the 
valley. 

After the Maid of Honor came the Queen, Jess Camp- 
bell, walking under a canopy of green and white flowers 
and carrying fleur de lis. The canopy was carried by 
Mary Lawson, Edith Heit, Freda Sidell and Ima Berry- 
man. 

Last came the six attendants, Elsa Richter, Nina 
Slaten, Mary Ebert, Celia Cathcart, Marjorie Foote and 
Blanche Rising. Three of these girls wore pink and the 
other three blue. 

Immediately after the crowning of the Queen and the 
departure of the old party from the throne, came the 
dance of the Sylphs. The Swedish wedding march fol- 
lowed, and then the "Awakening of the Poppies," the 
"Carnival of the Dasies" and the May Pole. The dancing 
and costumes for these drills were very artistic. 

The last number on the program was the Lantern 
March in which all the girls carried lighted lanterns, and 
in closing formed double lines through which the Queen's 
party walked as they left the throne. 



THE MAY BREAKFAST. 

In spite of his frequent sullen spells during the days 
preceding May thirteenth, the Sun decided to do his duty 
toward the Y. W. C. A. and smile upon that day. Although 
the fair maids of the college were allowed to sleep that 
morning, the penetrating rays of sunshine, together with 
Page Sixteen 



m 



n* 


n 


The C o 1 1 e sr e Greetinsf's 




% 


y«k 


b*G^ 



sounds of energetic preparation floating up from the back 
campus, served as a timely rising bell. By eight-thirty 
every one of the Sleeping Beauties was thoroughly awake 
and soon found her way to the East Court where she 
joined the waiting line. 

It was not a disheveled array of tri-colored kimonas, 
sleepy faces and curl papers, but a lively parade of freshly 
attired girls, with appetites healthy enough to suit even 
the Cabinet. That worthy, tireless body of workers, stood 
behind a long, hastily built table, and supplied the wants 
of the hungry throng. Most deftly and satisfactorily did 
they do this, from taking in tickets to furnishing the stick 
upon which to roast the bacon in the bonfire. 

A generous buttered bun made a resting place for 
this delicacy, so frequently burned to a crisp, but coffee 
helped drown the taste of ashes while strawberries with 
cream and doughnuts completely banished all cares. 

Some indiscreet young ladies returned for second 
helpings but prefer that their names should not be known. 

Fortunately about nine-thirty, the oft repeated bugle 
call, with which Professor Swarthout filled the air, put 
an end to their demands and in a few moments the Grand 
March was formed, for May Day was to follow. 



WESLEY MATHERS CONTESTS 

Each year interest grows in the Wesley Mathers Con- 
tests, and a larger number of students take part. The 
declamatory contest was held Monday evening. May 27. 
Seven students from the School of Expression gave a most 
interesting program. The first prize was awarded to 
Mary Ebert, who gave a scene from Les Miserables, and 

Page Seyenteen 





The C o 1 1 e §" t Greeting's 



the second prize was awarded to Jeanette Taylor, who 
read "A Tarnished Star," by Joseph Lincoln. 

The essay contest was held Wednesday afternoon, 
May 29. The Sophomore and Junior classes were each 
represented by two contestants. The Awakening of the 
Dragon, by Feme Reid, Sophomore, and Our Immigrant 
Problem, by Elizabeth Dunbar, Junior, were awarded the 
prizes. 



ffl COMMENCEMENT EVENTS 

The Academy Commencement. 

The Commencement season at I. W, C. opened Friday 
evening, May 31, at eight o'clock, when fifteen young 
ladies graduated from the Academy. A most interesting 
program was given. As an opening number Marie Wayne 
and Gladys Parks played a piano duet, Nobel and the 
Nobel Prizes was the subject of a most interesting essay 
by Isa Mullikin. Ara Large read a chapter from Adam 
Bede, after which Laura Bannister read an essay on Four 
Centuries of the Panama Canal. Emily Foster delivered 
an excellent oration on The Call of the American 
Forests. The program closed with a vocal solo by Lois 
Woods. The graduates were then presented with cer- 
tificates by Dr. Harker, who took this opportunity to con- 
gratulate the graduates on their present attainments and 
to wish success to each one in her chosen work. 



Expression Recital. 

One of the most enjoyable features of Commencement 
is the term end recital by the School of Expression. This 
Page Eighteen 



The College Greeting's 



year scenes from several plays were given instead of one 
entire play. The Court Scene from ''Merchant of Venice," 
the Wooing of Katherine from Henry V, and the Statue 
Scene from Winter's Tale were presented in a most pleas- 
ing manner. 



Art Exhibit. 

The art department, under the direction of Miss 
Knopf, gave an excellent exhibit. Work of the students 
in all courses was displayed. Crayon, water color and 
oil studies all showed the same attention to detail and 
carefulness of workmanship. The exhibit in designs and 
arts and crafts was also much admired and as usual the 
work in hand painted china was the subject of much favor- 
able comment. 



Exhibit of the School of Home Economics 

We were pleased to welcome so many friends to the 
annual exhibit which was held on Saturday, June 1, in 
the rooms of the Home Economics department. This was 
the closing event of a year which has been prosperous in 
every way. 

The exhibit consisted of a broad outline of the year's 
work, and the first year students prepared and served 
hot biscuits to the guests. The seniors planned and pre- 
pared the exhibits relative to their work. Graphic illus- 
trations from the courses in sewing, household manage- 
ment, house furnishings, sanitation, and cookery includ- 
ing diatetrics and nutrition with characteristic diets in 
special diseases, were suggestive of the lines of thought 
which are being pursued in the department. The one 
thought apparent in all phases of the exhibit was that 
each subject is a part of a whole which shall prepare 
women for lives of power and efficiency. 

Page Nineteen 



s^ 



The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 



Sunday Services 

At the Annual Sermon for the Y. W. C. A. at Cente- 
nary Church, Miss Helen Moore, President of the Asso- 
ciation, gave a most pleasing outline of the work done 
by the girls and of the plans for the future. 

Dr. McCarty then addressed the students on "Per- 
sonal Faith," and made this one of the most memorable 
parts of Commencement week. 



Baccalaureate Address 

Rev. Mr. Miller, pastor of Grace Church, delivered the 
Baccalaureate address Sunday evening, June 2, at Grace 
Church. "lyiving for Things that Count" was his theme, 
and he handled it in a most impressive manner. He em- 
phasized the necessity of so equiping oneself that he will 
best be fitted for larger social service. 



Class Day 

Never have the Fates been more i^ropitious than dur- 
ing the Commencement season of 1912, and a more perfect 
summer morning cannot be imagined than was Monday, 
June 3, when the Seniors had their Class Day. 

The Processional was played by Clarissa Garlsnd and 
Myrtle Walker. First came the Juniors acting as escort 
to the Seniors; then came the Freshmen in two lines, bear- 
ing daisy chains, and between them marched the Seniors. 

Ireland, the "Land of Destiny," was the subject of 
Miss Heflin's essay. She outlined Ireland's subject of 
struggle and conflict, her persistent fight for her national 
life in the face of English political supremacy, and closed 
with a clear and scholarly view of the present situation, 
leaving with us Ireland 's hopes for the future, and a more 
personal interest in her destiny. 

Page Twenty 



The C o 1 1 e §■ e Greet iyig-s 



^^ 



Miss Walker, a Senior in the College of Music, played 
Beethoven's Sonata, Op. 27, No. 2, and showed interpreta- 
tive charm and intelligent appreciation. 

The theme of the Oration was the rights and respon- 
sibilities of individuals and nations. 

Miss Asplund enlarged upon the thoughts, "Every 
man has a right to be self-respecting." A national con- 
science cannot be created if the citizens of that nation are 
working only for self-interest and material gain. She 
made a direct appeal for a more vital sense of human re- 
sponsibility. 

Miss Vickery, a Senior in Expression, read a beauti- 
ful poem of Bliss Carman, *'As the Making of Man," 
where the three Archangels are singing of man 's destiny — ■ 
through power and reason and soul, leading ever upward 
and onward to "that vast event, the large and simple 
good." 

Misses Shuff, Stimpson, Hopper and Widenham sang 
"Music When Soft Voices Die," and were followed by 
Miss Gates who gave a very delightful Class Prophesy 
with Ariel as the sprite who was swift to do her bidding, 
and bring her messages from her class-mates. 

Miss Rearich then presented something for remem- 
brance to each of the College classes, giving to next year's 
Freshmen the yellow and white — the colors of 1912. 

The ivy planting on the College Campus was the pret- 
tiest part of the morning's exercises, and made a most 
attractive close to the exercises of Class Day. 



Alumnae Meeting. 

Monday afternoon, June 3, the annual meeting of the 
Alumnae Association was held in the Belles Lettres Hall. 
The meeting was in charge of Mrs. Hopper, president of 
the association. Mrs. Hopper welcomed the old members 

Page Twenty-one 




The C o 1 1 e g" e Greeting's 



present and expressed the wish that as the years went 
by the attendance might increase. The members of the 
class of 1912 were introduced by the class officer, Miss 
Cowgill, and they were welcomed into the association by 
Miss Anna Stevenson, The response for the class was 
made by Ethel Rose. As general secretary Mrs. Lambert 
gave a most interesting account of the doings of former 
students and alumnae. Satisfactory reports were given 
by the treasurer, Janette Powell, and the treasurer of the 
alumnae fund, Mrs. John "Ward. President Harker next 
spoke a word to the alumnae, emphasizing the importance 
and necessity of their hearty co-operation and support 
during the present campaign for an endowment fund. 
Greetings and expression of good will were brought from 
the Academy by Mrs. Truman Carter and the response in 
behalf of the I. "W. C. alumnae was made by Mrs. Paul 
Thompson. The meeting adjourned with the singing of 
the alumnae song. 

The following officers were elected for the coming 
year : 

President — Mrs. E. C. Lambert. 

Vice presidents — Mrs. James T. King, Miss Mary 
Caldwell, Mrs. W. W. Gillham and Mrs. Thomas Buck- 
thorpe. 

General secretary — Miss Elizabeth Capps. 

Recording secretary — Miss Alice Wadsworth. 

Treasurer — Miss Anna Reid. 

Vice president at large — Mrs. Kuhl. 



Commencement Recital. 

Monday evening, June 3, occurred the annual com- 
mencement concert of the College of Music. Seldom has a 
more interesting program been given in Music Hall, and 
each number was most enthusiastically received. There 
Page Twenty-two 



The C o 1 1 e g- e Greetings 




were six graduates from the Music Department and they 
together with several advanced students gave an evening 
of rare pleasure to the friends and visitors of the college. 



Commencement Day. 

The sixty-sixth commencement exercises were held 
Tuesday morning in Music Hall. The procession formed 
in the main building at 9 :30 and the long line of trustees, 
faculty members, conference visitors, alumnae graduates 
and students marched across the campus to Music Hall. 
The order of exercises was : 

(a) The West Wind and the May; (b) Spring Her- 
alds—Mabel W. Daniels. 

Glee Club. 

Prayer. 

Violin solo, Capriccio Valse (Wieniawski) — Max W. 
Swarthout. 

Commencement address — The Rev. William A. Quayle, 
D. D., bishop of the Methodist church. 

Vocal solos, (a) Boat Song (Ware) ; (b) Song to the 
Evening Star (Wagner) _(from Tannhauser) — William 
Preston Phillips. 

Presentation of diplomas and conferring of degrees. 

President's annual statement. 

Benediction. 

Bishop Quayle 's address was an eloquent, impassioned 
appeal to make life worth living. Full of earnestness and 
inspiration, he stated the necessity of living ALL of life, 
of accepting its sorrows as well as its joys, of bravely 
singing, when the heart held no song. He plead for the 
exaltation and dignity that the proper kind of an ideal 
could give to daily tasks that seem small and insignificant. 

Following the presentation of diplomas and con- 
ferring of degrees, Dr. Harker made his annual report. 

Page Twenty-three 



^^ 



The C o 1 1 e g" e Greetings 



^^ 



Especial interest was added to the occasion by the an- 
nouncement that the $50,000 he had hoped to secure by 
commencement had been raised with the exception of 
$450. This was soon pledged by friends in the audience 
and then Dr. Harker surprised everyone by reading a 
telegram from Dr. Welch giving $5,000 for the fund. 

After the commencement exercises, the reception for 
the Seniors was held in the reception hall. At one o'clock 
occurred the annual luncheon given the alumnae by 
Dr. and Mrs. Harker. This event is always looked for- 
ward to by the alumnae with great pleasure and this year 
proved no exception to the rule. At the close of the 
luncheon a number of the alumnae attested to their con- 
tinued interest in the growth and success of the school 
and the sixty-sixth commencement closed with hearty 
good wishes as all joined in the singing of the college song. 




Page Twenty-four 



GEO. T. DOUGLAS 

FANCY GROCERIES 
234 West State St. 738 E. North St. 



OF CLASS INTEREST. 

Before the closing of the school year, the various 
classes enjoyed a number of class functions : 



Joseph Heinl & Sons 

FLORISTS 
Jacksonville, 111. Both Phones 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 



DR. KOPPERL 

Dentist 

326 w. state St. 



SHOES 



We invite you to come to our 

store and look over a line 

of shoes that are rig-ht 

W. T. RBAUGH 

Fashionable Footwear 
South Side Sq. 



F. J. WADDELL & CO. 

Suits, Coats, Costumes, Skirts, Waists, Corsets 

Muslin Underwear, Gloves, Hosiery 

Novelties and Newest Models 

Shown always at moderate prices 



The Sophomores enjoyed a breakfast at Nicholas 
Park one Monday morning. 



DRESSY I,OW SHOES 

We are showing low shoe styles of 
the prevailing cuti and materials, 
adapted espacially for young people's 
wants. 

Make your selections early. 

H O F=> F= E F=R © 

We Repair Shoes 





Jacksonvilles Largest Mens' Store 

Pennants and Banners 

I. W. C. and Fraternity special designs 

Manish Cut Sweater Coats 

Hand Bags, Trunks 

and Suit Cases 



McCULLOUGH BROS. 

Professional 
Photog-raphers 

HockenhuU Bldg". 



PACIFIC HOTEL 

H. Foulk J. B. Snell 
Proprietors 

Jacksonville, Illinois 



Special Offer to Students! 

Any of my ^5, ^6, $-] and ^8 Carbon 
or Platinum Photos, cabinet size 

3 for $1.00 

NOT GOOD AFTER MAY 1st 

Only 3 at this price to a student 

Special Rates on other sizes 

McDougall's Studio 

West State Street 



Saturday, May 25, the Seniors had a supper at the 
Peacock Inn. 



"ROBERTS' for QUALITY" 

Is not a mere phrase. It is the foundation of our success 
and reputation and our aim for the future. 

ROBERTS BROTHERS 

HIGH GRADE GROCERY AND PHARMACY 

DELIVERY SERVICE PHONE 800 



VISIT 



EHNIES' 



FOR 



FRESH HOME MADE CANDY 

Pure Ice Cream and Soda Water 

Fine Box Chocolates 

216 EAST STATE ST. 



E. W. BASSETT 

OOL-L-EOE UE\A/EL-FRX 

Copper and Brass Goods, Desk Clocks, Desk Sets, Chaf- 
ing* Dishes, Percolators, Alcohol Stoves, Kettles. 

COLLEGE AND SOCIETY STATIONERY 

SPECIAL SOCIETY ENGRAVING 

DONE TO ORDER 

Kodak Supplies Amateur Finishing 

21 South Side Square 



Saturday, May 25, the Freshmen entertained the 
Sophomores with a hay-ride to Gravel Springs. 



A BARGAIN 
IN STATIONERY 

78 Sheets of Linen Paper 
and 50 Envelopes to match 

all for 25c 

Armstrongs Drug Store 

The Quality Store 
Southwest Corner Square 



A. L. BROMLEY 
TAILOR 

315 W. State St. 111. Phone 169 

Suits, Coats and Skirts 

made to order by expert tailors 

Cleaning, Pressing-, Dying* 

and alterations of all kinds 

Special rates to students 

Work called for and delivered promptly. 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 
Fancy Bazaar and Millinery 

211 West state street 



I DO 

Kodak Finishing- 
Bromide enlarging- 
Flashlig-hts 
and Views 

CLAUDE B. VAIL 

Oswald's Drug Store, 71 E. Side Square 

Residence Phone, 111. 1493 



montgome:ry & de)ppe)'s 

Everything in Dry Goods — Well Lighted 
first floor cloak and suit room 

Agents for Ladies Home Jourual Patterns 
The new "Howd" front laced corsets 



The Juniors greatly assisted the Seniors during Com- 
mencement, decorating for the various commencement 
events, and making themselves helpful in many ways. 



SNKRLY & TAYLOR 
Select Groceries 

221 West state Street 



GAY'S 
I RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 




jAGifSONVILUS, IgJLt 

Established 1890 

Low Prices, Square Dealing- 
Keep us busy 



Illinois Phone 57 Bell Phone 92 

Fresh Drug's, Fancy Goods, 

Stationery 

THE 
BADGER DRUG STORE 

2 doors West of PostoflSce 
235 E. State Street. 



The most dainty things in Rings and Jewelry. New 

and handsome styles of g^oods in Sterling- Siver. 

Highest grades of Cut Glass, and every description 

of Spectacles and Eye Glasses 

Fine Diamonds a Speciality 

at 

RUSSKLL & LYON'S 

West Side Square 
Both Phones 96 



The Academy Seniors went to Vickerys after their 
Commencement exercises. 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

C City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 E. State St. Jacksonville, 111. 
Illinois Telephone 388 



lyadies' High Grade, I^ate Style 
FUR SCARFS and MUFFS 

ARE SOLD BY 

Frank Byrns 

Most Reasonable Prices 



Pictorial Review Patterns 

For Sale at 




"A DELIGHTFUL RIDE" 
This will always be the cry 
if the rig- came from 

CHERRY'S 

Horses are fine travelers but 
gentle and safe. 

All equipage the finest 
Call either phone 

CHERRY'S LIVERY 



)R. Albyn Lincoln Adams 

Oculist and Aurist to 

School for the Blind 

323 W. State St. 

Practice limited to diseases of 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Botli Telephones 



Dr. R. R. BUCKTHORPE 
Dentist 

( 111. House 1054. 
Phones ■< Bell. Office 512. 
I 111. Office 750. 

Over Hatch Drug Store 

Jacksonville, 111. 



Next year's Seniors and Juniors have pledged $50 
for the endowment fund. 



DENNIS SCHRAM 

Jeweler 

College Pins, Spoons, Etc. 

South Side Square 
JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



BARGAIN BOOK STORE 



DR. CARL E. BLACK 

Office— 349 E. State St. 
Telephone, either line, No. 85. 

Residence — 1305 West State Street 

Telephone, either line. No. 285 
Surgery— Pasaavant Memorial Hospit- 
al and Our Savior's Hospital 
Hospital Hours— 9 a. m. to 12 m. 
Office Hours— 1:30 to 4 p. m. Even- 
ings and Sundays by appointment 



West State Street 



EXPERIENCED HAIR DRESSER 

I am prepared to manufacture hair 
combings in the latest style. Sham- 
pooing and scalp massage done by ap- 
pointment at your residence. 

ELORENGE KIRK KING 



503 W. College°St. 



111. Phone 837 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe Say 

We can furnisli your 

Shoes and Party Slippers 

in the popular styles 

leathers, and 

fabrics 


J. P. BROWN 

Sheet Music and Musical 
Merchandise 

Talking Machines and Supplies 

Mail Orders Solicited 

S. W. Cor. Square 


SOCIETY NOTES 

Friday, May 31, the Phi Nus had a picnic in honor of 
the Seniors at Nicholas Park. 


JOHN K. LONG 

Job Printing" 
Engraved Cards and Invitations 

Loose Leaf Note Books 
Illinois Phone 400 

no North West St. 


4 
Hillerby's 

Dry Goods Store 

Safest Place 
to Trade 


DOillBI H 

AI.I. KINDS OF FRESH and 

SALT MEATS, FISH, 

POULTRY, ETC. 

Both Phones 196 230 W. State St. 


Ask your grocer for 

HOLSUM 

BREAD 

Made clean. Delivered cleat 
in waxed paper wrappers 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING 

for the latest in Suits, Ladies' Underwear, Ribbons, 

Laces, E^mbroidery Materials or Notions 

Visit the store that carries the 

up to date merchandise 

PHELPS & osborne: 



The Belles Lettres entertained the Seniors Monday, 
May 27, at a luncheon at the Colonial Inn. 



CHAS. M. HOPPER 
Dentist 

2ii S. Side Square 



COOK 

LIGHT with GAS 
HEAT 

Jacksonville Railway & 
Light Company 

234 South Main Street 



Brady Brothers 

Hardware, Cutlery 
Paints 



Fancy Toilets 



Christmas Goods 



COOVER & SHREVE'S 
Drug Store 



Kodaks and Supplies 

Developtng and Finishing 




Andre & Andre 

house: furnishings of quality 

When you think of Furnishing-s for 

the Home or Office 

THINK OF US 

48-50 North Side Square 



The members of Phi Nu and Belles Lettres entertained 
their former members Monday afternoon, June 3, imme- 
diately after the Alumnae meeting. A most delightful 
social hour gave all an opportunity for forming new 
acquaintanceships and renewing old ones. 



The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital . . . $200,000 

Surplus . . . 20,000 

Deposits . . , 1,100,000 

U. S. Depository for Postal Savings Bank 

Julius E. Strawn, President 
Miller Weir, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear, H.J. Rog- 
ers, A- A. Curry, C. B. Graff 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



We make a specialty of catering- to I. W. C. students 
We also make nice Birthday Cakes with dates and ini- 
itials and delicious new Sundaes which collegfe g-irls 
appreciate so much. 
Phone us your wants and we will deliver same to colleg^e 
Let us furnish you an estimate on your next class recep- 
tion or social function of any kind. 
We have both phones. No. 227 

vicKERY & me:rrigan 

Caterers 527 West State St. 



SKIRT BOXES 

ROCKERS, SCREENS, DESKS 

AND BED ROOM CURTAINS 

AT 

OHNSON, HACKETT & GUTHRIE'S 



The Belles lyettres seniors presented the society with a 
beautiful fern basket. 



E. Farrell E. E. Crabtree 

Established 1865 

. G. FARREIvL & CO. 

BANKERS 
uccessors to First National Bank 
Jacksonville, 111. 



C. S. MARTIN 

Fine Pictures — Artistic Framing 

Frames and Ovals of all 

descriptions and sizes 

314 W. State St., Scott Block 

Jacksonville, 111. 




ISl 




Frank EUiott, Pres. Wm. R. Routt, V.-Pres. 

C. A. Johnson, Vice-Pres. 

J. Weir Elliott, Cashier 

J. AUerton Palmer, Asst. Cashier 

ELLIOTT STATE BANK 

Jacksonville, 111. 
Capital $150,000 

Undivided Profits $ 12,000 

DIRECTORS 
Frank Elliott Frank R. Elliott 

J. Weir Elliott John A. Bellatti 

Wm. R. Routt C. A. Johnson 

Wm. S. Elliott 



pboto portraiture 

OXXO ©F=»IEXH 

Successor to 
The Watson Studio 

Southwest Corner Square 



The Phi Nu seniors gave a piano bench to the other 
members of the society. 



We always have 

The Latest Novelties 

for Young" Women 

We have made our success by 

anticipating" 
Correct Styles for each season 

EVENING Sl^IPPERS 

JAMES McGINNIS & CO. 

62 EBSt Side Square 



Piepenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 
HERE TO PIvEASE 

Candies, Cakes, Cookies, Pies 

Sandwiches, Pop on Ice, 

Groceries, 

California Fruits, 

School Supplies 



HARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO, 

Desig"ns, Cut Flowers 
Plants 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

Store: Pell Phone 154, 111. 182 

Greehouset, Bell 775 



GIRLS: Come and visit me 
at my little Hat Shop. I 
give especial attention and 
prices to colleg"e g"irls. 

DORA P. ROBINSON 

537 South Diamond Street 



Cfie College (^reetinss 

•I The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 
€|| Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month. 

<[| Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies 15c. 
<]f Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 



Contents 

Editorial 3 

Autumn Sketches 4 

Released ... . 7 

Making It 7 

Prairie Scene 9 

A Wheat Field 9 

The Secret of the Star 10 

Beowulf 12 

Opening Chapel Service 16 

Faculty Notes 17 

Departments 19 

Society Notes .... ! ... 22 

Alumnae Notes 23 

Y. W. C. A. Notes 25 

I^ocals 26 





There is a beautiful spirit 

breathing now 
Its mellow richness on the 

clustered trees, 
And, from a beaker full of 

richest dyes, 
Pouring new glory on the 

Autumn woods, 
And dipping in warm light the 

pillared clouds. 

— Longfelloiv 



Zhc College (greetings 

Vol. XVI Jacksonville, 111 , October, 1912 No. I 

FacuI/Ty Committee;— Miss Weaver, Miss Tanner, Miss Neville 
Editor— Lois M. Coultas 

Associate Editors — Elizabeth Tendick, Letta Irwin, Mary Lawson 
Business Managers— Elizabeth Dunbar, Emily Jane Allan, Helena 
Munson 



In these days when a welcome and helping hand are 
being extended to the new students by the various col- 
lege departments and organizations, the Greetings is glad 
to add its voice to those of the others. 

Each year sees an increase in the number of regular 
college students at I. W. C, and a greater interest in 
their work. We are justly proud of both faculty and 
students. A spirit of earnestness on the part of both has 
characterized these first few days of school and we are 
looking forward to a better school year than ever before. 

We are glad to call attention to the number of maga- 
zines, in the library racks, which, if carefully and judi- 
cially read, will keep us wide awake to current interests. 
The criticism is often made, and made justly, that the 
college student does not keep in touch with the main cur- 
rents of present day thought. A word of warning about 
absorption in schedules, to the point of neglect of our 
library opportunities, should be given. In this connection 
we are glad to mention the addition to the library of the 
rows of new books by many modern writers. These acces- 
sions cannot fail to prove an inducement to more careful 
and individual research in the various lines of present day 
thought and activity. 

We must speak, along this line, of the gratifying indi- 
cations of an increasing interest among the students, in 

Page Three 




tEPfje CoUege ^reetingg 



modern problems. Practical Problems of Social Service 
is a new course this year. This course, with the one on 
Industrial History is proving popular among the students. 

We are anticipating the pleasure of a series of lec- 
tures and concerts offered this year, in the Artists ' Course, 
to the Student Body. More detailed announcements will 
be made later. 

Fair play is always the standard of the College G-reet- 
ings. The merchants and business men of the city have 
advertised generously in our columns and we urge all 
students of I. W. C. to pay especial attention to our list 
of advertisements and to extend to the business houses 
thus represented liberal patronage. 

In the college home, several minor changes have been 
made, such as freshly papered walls and attractive, new 
rugs in tans and browns, for many of the rooms in the 
Main Building. The recent rains have kept the campus 
green and fresh and the college presents, this fall, an 
unusually attractive appearance. 

AUTUMN SKETCHES. 

The last strips of yellow and gold faintly lighted up 
the western horizon, and the first traces of night shadows 
were asserting themselves. The air was heavy with the 
odor of dry leaves and the smoke of autumn bonfires. 
There was nothing to disturb the quiet, save the soft twit- 
tering of birds in the two barn-yard maples, and the 
vociferous crowing of the belated cock that was remon- 
strating the loss of his usual place on the roost. Suddenly, 
however, the peace was broken by the humming and 
flapping of many wings. The sky became dotted with 
great splotches of black that circled around and around 
and then, in a moment, were lost in the green bed of the 
maples. One flock followed closely upon another; then, 
after a few moments they came at greater intervals, until 
Page Four 



i 



^^ 



tECIje College Greetings; 



finally only a few stragglers, lost from the crowd darted 
about uncertainly in the air. With each addition, the 
commotion in the trees grew, until as the last dark spot 
vanished, the uproar was so great that the cock crowed in 
amazement from his recovered perch. 

AMELIA GRUENEWALD. 

The rain was falling in torrents, the wind blowing a 
terrific gale from the sea. The great, green breakers, with 
their foamy edges, rolled like mountains as far as the eye 
could see. Each breaker gathered power from the one 
behind it, until it reached the cliff, against which it dashed 
itself with all its gathered force. It seemed as if the cliff 
must give way, but it stood firm and black, dashing the 
sea back upon itself again. 

The waves sank back as if to gain breath for a new 
plunge. Then on they came Avith angry roar and such 
fury that they sent the spray high in the air, only to fall 
back again among the rocks, where it foamed and swirled 
in rage. ANNA SHIPLEY, '14. 

The leaves were lazily falling, little by little. The 
gorgeous splendor of the trees was becoming the gor- 
geous covering of the earth. The squirrels whisked here 
and there, busily adding a few more nuts to their winter 
store. Chattering in mischief, they leaped from tree to 
tree, showering a path of leaves down behind them, while 
a young rabbit lazily nibbled the grass, unable to under- 
stand the ambitions of his cousins. The robins, wrens, 
and thrushes were gayly clamouring in their prepara- 
tions for departure. From the tops of the trees, the 
blackbirds were singing their farewell songs. The blue- 
.jays were noisily crying, "Why go? Stay here with us." 
Suddenly, a hush fell over them, as they heard in the 
distance a faint honk, honk. It came nearer and nearer 



Page Five 




tE^fte College <greetingfii 




until it was above them. Then with one accord, they rose 

on wing to join the flight of the wild geese to a warmer 

land, leaving the rabbits and squirrels to risk the cold 

and the scanty fare of winter. 

ABBIE PEAVOY, '14. 

The autumn sun, hanging low in the faraway sky, 
seems to smile at the wooded hill, radiant in the many 
hued garment of the changing season. The green leaves 
of only yesterday have softened to yellows. In the midst 
of a clump of trees, haughty in their crimson splendor, 
stands a modest evergreen, upon whom her more bril- 
liantly adorned sisters look down as much as to say, ''How 
tiresome it must be to have to wear the same gown the 
year around ! ' ' But a wandering breeze passes over them 
just then and, hearing their ill-timed remark, robs them 
of their beauty as the leaves fall in a fluttering shower. 

Halfway down the hill, a chubby brown squirrel is 
chasing a rolling nut. The crisp leaves and brittle twigs 
crack under his tiny feet. Faster and faster he goes, 
until, in spite of hindrances, he wins the trophy. He sits 
erect and is carefully examining the nut to see if it will 
do for his winter hoard when the sharp report of a 
hunters' rifle in the next field sends him scurrying to his 
hollow in the big oak tree. 

Round about his home can be seen a fcAv fragile wild 
flowers, timidly lifting their tiny petals from the warm 
coverlet of dried moss and leaves, to see if others of their 
kind are still venturing to bloom. The world is so won- 
derfully pretty that they have no desire to leave it. 

Above are two belated red breasts singing their fare- 
well solos to the hill. "With the last clear note, they fly 
around to the trees, bestowing affectionate little pecks 
upon the gray trunks and promising to come back early 
from their winter flight. 

CELIA S. CARTHCART, '15. 

Page Si^ 



W^f)t College ^reetingjf 



"^m 



RELEASED. 

One hot summer day while reading Victor Hugo's 
"Les Miserables, " I was suddenly surprised at hearing a 
rattling of chains. On looking up, I saw a tall, broad 
shouldered man standing beside me, clad in prison stripes 
and closely fettered to the wall. Then I realized that I 
was no longer in the library reading. Instead I sat in a 
damp and dingy cell where beside me a man, Jean Valjean, 
began telling me of his life. Trembling with fear, I 
listened as he told me of his boyhood, of his imprisonment 
for stealing a loaf of bread, of his fruitless efforts to 
escape, of his lengthened term, of his final freedom and its 
disappointments, of the good Bishop, of his lost identity 
and the beginning of a new life as a benefactor to m_an- 
kind. As he told of his life as mayor of the little sea town 
and of his rescue of the poor Fantine, my heart warmed 
toward him; al! fear was dispelled. With intent sadness 
I heard how he had been reimprisoned because of his self 
surrender when an innocent man had been arrested as the 
former Jean Valjean. He was now serving this second 
imprisonment. He was telling how he planned to escape, 
how he intended to rescue the child Cosette from the 
cruel guardians. He showed me the little file enclosed in 
a coin and the spliced rope with Avhich he was to make his 
escape. While he talked he constantly filed away until 
with a terrific thud the iron bars fell. I could hear the 
warders' voices as they approached. With a start I 
jumped to my feet. There lay my book on the floor and 
Brother was saying, ''How do you like it?" 

ERMA LYTLE ELLIOTT, '14. 

MAKING IT. 

"This car goes no farther, passengers for the C. & 
E. I. station must walk!" Such was the information 

Page Seven 




mmmmaassR 



i;f)£ CoUegc ^vettin^s 



cheerfully announced by the conductor on a street car, 
one hot summer evening when the sky had every appear- 
ance of an approaching storm. As we, who wished to 
catch the train, l)egan to collect our belongings, he added 
a trifle diseouragingly, "You have just six minutes." 

The station was a block and a half away! I gasped, 
and snatching up my suitcase, kodak, parasol and pocket- 
book, bumped and thumped down the aisle with such 
speed that I landed upon the pavement, almost before I 
was aware of it. Taking a fresh grip on my burdens, I 
switched around the end of the ear and started toward 
the station. The wind was rising to a gale and I began 
to hear rain drops pattering on the rim of my hat. That 
particular article had slid to one side of my head and hung 
there by one hat pin, twisted maddeningly through a few 
strands of hair. Heedless of everything, save the fact 
that I must get there, I trotted breathlessly on. Sud- 
denly, without warning, a terrific clap of thunder rent 
the air. Of course I dropped everything to cover my 
ears and scream, thereby losing a valuable minute. I had 
just resumed my half run. half walk pace when the train 
Avhistled. For once the wind was kind, for as it chanced 
to be in the right direction, I allowed myself to be carried 
along by it. By this time the street was a confused mass 
of rain, sand, and people. Just as I was despairing of 
ever reaching the tracks with all my luggage, an unusu- 
ally violent gust of wind blew me up the steps and against 
the rear door of the station with an unexpected bump. 
The door flew open letting me tumble in headlong. A 
wild glance about me through sand filled eyes showed my 
train on the track. By making a last desperate effort I 
was able to climb on the last coach. There, I commenced 
the search for my breath. 

FREDA SIDELL. '15. 



Page Eight 



tlTfje College Greetings! 




PRAIRIE SCENE. 

Slow though the trip had been we at last reached a 
space that had once been a homestead. The tumbled chim- 
ney overgrown with brambles and vines told of an aban- 
doned hearth stone. Blackened remnants that resembled 
those of a picnic campfire were scattered over the dry 
parched ground. The great, glistening white clouds drift- 
ing slowly along were the only signs of motion, for even 
the busy grass-hoppers were as motionless in that scorch- 
ing sun as so many grass-hoppers cast in bronze. Their 
large glittering, watchful eyes were their signs of life. 

For miles and miles on all sides the prairies spread 
themselves out in vast level reaches. As we looked to- 
ward the east, the great stretch of grayish-green sage 
brush seemed to melt into the horizon. Toward the west 
it began to climb over softly rounded mounds that grew 
higher and sharper and occasionally broke into jagged 
points. Those low, unformed lumps of mountains jum- 
led aimlessly together gave this whole desolate plain 
the appearance of a waste yard of creation scattered with 
the remnants of the making of the earth. 

MARY LAWSON '15. 

A WHEAT FIELD 

Standing waist deep in the nodding bowing wheat, 
I looked around at the broad expanse of ripe grain. In 
the slant rays of the afternoon sun, the already rich mel- 
low hue blended harmoniously with the blue of the sky 
overhead. A sleepy summer breeze ruffled the heavy 
heads and they bent gracefully forward only to sway lei- 
surely back as the wave passed on across the great golden 
sea. Here and there a stiff spot of green indicated a 
worthless weed that had presumed to thrust itself upon 
this flourishing crop. As I walked carefully among the 
slender rustling stalks, they seemed to cling caressingly 

Page Nine 




tEije CoUege (Greetings! 



to me, then to swing back and bow in the next wave that 
stirred the field. 

Beyond, to my left a green pasture sloped upward to 
a elump of trees, in whose long cool shadows sheep were 
grazing. On the other side of me was a stretch of wood- 
land in which a flock of quarrelsome black birds were 
holding their camp meeting. Then in contrast to their 
rasping noise I heard the sweet, clear call of a bob-white 
not far away. He seemed to wait but received no reply 
except the rustling murmur of the bearded heads as they 
bowed again in obedience to some truant zephyr. Taking 
a few steps farther I stooped to break off some top heavy 
stalks. Suddenly a few rods away there was a whirr of 
wings. I looked up just as a number of quails arose from 
the golden depths in frightened indignation. A moment 
they circled around; then flew away uttering plaintive 
cries. Sorry for the disturbance I had caused I turned 
and retraced my steps, surprised to find how far I had 
wandered at the call of this waving grain. 

FREDA SIDELL, '15. 

THE SECRET OF THE STAR. 

Just above the church steeple each night were seen 
two large bright stars. In each other's companionship 
their happiness seemed complete until a naughty little 
3^ellow star disturbed their quiet. Worse than a spoiled 
child was this disagreeable little star. He whined, and 
asked the most absurd questions, was so discontented and, 
sometimes, poked fun at the lover-stars. He couldn't 
see why he couldn't stay out when it got light. He 
fretted that he could not see what happened instead of 
going in and being "just jewels" for the angels. In truth 
he did not like anything; he did not like it because he 
was not so large and bright as the lover stars. They 
all had secrets and never told him a single thing. Thus 
Page Ten 




turtle College <greetins2i 




he fretted and teased and in every way he could, he inter- 
rupted the lover-stars. 

Then one morning when Mother Starlight called for 
the stars to "come in," the naughty little yellow star 
stayed out. "Now, I'll see something," he said, chuck- 
ling to himself; but when the sun came up bright and 
red, it made the little star's eye ache (you know a star's eye 
is its whole body) as the sun grew brighter the star's eye 
winked harder until, suddenly, through a hole in the sky, 
it started to earth. As it kept falling and falling, nearly 
frightened to death, it came, once, to the place where the 
winds blow all directions at once. There, it nearly lost its 
breath. At last, the little star reaching the earth, fell 
into a deep pond. 

At first the frogs and the fish and all the water ani- 
mals were terribly frightened; but they were not so 
frightened as the naughty little star. But after awhile 
they were not afraid any more. The fishes and frogs and 
turtles used it for a lantern. 

In the day time the star was quite satisfied with his 
new home; but at night the other stars seemed to come 
down into the pond and say, "Aren't you ashamed? You 
have made Mother Starlight so sad. Why couldn't you 
wait awhile? You were too young to know all of our 
secrets. Now we have patched up the hole you made in 
the sky and you can't come back, however lonesome you 
are." 

Then he saw the lover-stars and he began to be very 
sorry that he had disobeyed. Before very long he was so 
ashamed he could not bear to look at the stars and he 
cried, "Oh, put me some place where I never need to see 
the stars again." 

The fishes and frogs, who by this time felt very grate- 
ful to the little star for his light and warmth, were very 
sorry for him. After thinking a long time of the star's 
plight, they went off to call an assembly in the corner of 

Page Eleven 



^fte CoEegc ^reettng^ 




the pond. They could plan no escape, think as they 
would. When finally the water fairies said that they 
would hide him in a little green ball which they had, there 
would come a surprise. They placed the star in the bulb 
and around him wrapped the green leaves. Before long 
the bulb grew. A stem pushed up and up until it came 
above the water. The green leaves unfolded and showed 
snowy white petals, then the white leaves opened and 
showed the charm of the fairies — a center of golden yel- 
low. The flower looijed happily up at the sun, for it 
cared, no longer, for dull light of the night, instead it 
glowed in the brilliancy of the sun. And when the sun 
had gone down, the white petals before the stars came 
out, closed tightly around the little yellow star. 

People called it, now, a water lily, and when the stars 
came down at night, they looked for the star in the pond 
and wondered where he had gone. They looked but saw 
nothing. Finally, listening, they heard the frogs, croak- 
ing softly from the pond, "We had a secret, too." 

ABBIE PEAVOY, '14. 

BEOWULF 

From the time that we first see the name "Beowulf" 
on the library shelf and, opening the book at the title page, 
read "An Anglo-Saxon Epic," that monument of litera- 
ture is set aside as a work of unknown horrors, an antique 
"Conciliation with America" with which we must in time 
do battle. When, however, we actually begin to read the 
poem, the story-teller so disarms our mood that we at once 
find our prejudice supplanted by an active interest which 
continues to the closing lines, with the exception perhaps 
of a few scattered pages devoted to genealogy. We find 
a power of characterization, a beauty of description, an 
expressiveness in vocabulary, and a subtlety of suspense, 
little expected in so early a tale. 

Pa-e Twelve 



mmmiamiim mmK^ammm mmm warn ■— 

^Ije College (Greetings! 




A direct, narrative start — 

"Lo! we of the Spear Danes, in days of yore, 
Warrior king's glory have heard, 
How the princes heroic deeds wrought" — 
followed by a short, concise setting, prepares us easily for 
the beginning of the action. Unconsciously as the teller 
becomes engrossed in his story, the long, descriptive sen- 
tences of the early part of the narrative are superseded by 
shorter sentences. The action heightens. Within the first 
two hundred lines, we know about Hrothgar, "old and 
good"; about the monster Grendel, the "mighty mark- 
stepper," who harasses Hearot ; and about Beowulf, "of 
mankind strongest in might . . . noble and great," wlio 
proposes to free Hrothgar from the devastations of the 
"demon of death, grim and greedy . . . fierce and fur- 
ious." 

The opposing forces are clearly drawn. The odds seem 
great against Beowulf and yet we feel an eager confidence 
in him. With almost breathless interest we watch him 
through the conflict, confident that he must win, but always 
just a little apprehensive regarding the issue of the conflict. 
Especially in the last division of the poem appear fore- 
shadowings of the rest of the story. 

Wyrd" is "very nigh." Beowulf has 
. . . survived each one of struggles, 

till that very day 

That he 'gainst the serpent was going to fight." 

Throughout the poem an appealing artlessness is 
strongly noticeable. With the interest of a child in his 
story, the teller goes on delightedly, stopping at times in 
the midst of the action to recount some bit of legend, some 
story well-known to his countrymen, as in the minstrel's 
song of Sigemund and Fitela, and of Heremod. Again, just 
after Beowulf comes to Heorot, the long episode of the 
swimming-match with Breca is introduced. It is interrup- 
tions like this that cause much of the constant retracing — 

Page Thirteen 




tE^fje College (Greetings! 




this eager love for the story that provokes the continual 
hints of the advance plot. So eager is the interest in the 
action that Beowulf's feats are recounted again and again, 
by the third person, by the warriors in the mead-hall, and 
by Beowulf himself, each time with a different point of view. 
There is a remarkably developed skill in the use of 
figures of speech, chiefly metaphors, which are very vivid 
and forceful. In such epithets as the "whale-road," the 
"swan-path," there is a subtle power of suggestion. The 
descriptions in the poem, especially the nature pictures are 
telling. The groves are "rustling," the nesses "windy," and 
the moor "murky." "Night's canopy lowered dark o'er the 
warriors." The sun is the "bright beacon of God," 
"Heaven's gem." 

. . . "In storm rolled the ocean, 
Fought with the wind ; winter the waves locked 
In its icy hand." 
Pathos permeates the description of the universality 
of death: 

"Soon after it shall be 
That sickness or sword shall rob thee of might. 
Or clutch of the fire, or swell of the flood. 
Or grip of the sword, or flight of the arrow, 
Or fearful old age, or light of the eyes 
Shall fail and grow dark; it suddenly shall be 
That thee, great warrior, death shall overcome." 
Beowulf did not die, but 

. . . "from his breast went 
His soul to seek the doom of the saints." 
The poem contains many structural peculiarities. Of 
the most marked are the many inversions. It is not, for 
instance, "The fiend reached out against him," but "Him 
reached out against the fiend"; not "The worker of evil 
perceived this," but "This perceived the worker of evil." 
We also find long suspensions of verbs from their subjects, 
caused usually by the piling up of oppositives to the subject. 
Page Fourteen 



tIDfje College (JPreetingfii 




Hrothgar is called "Noblest of men, craftiest of churls, 
Prince of the Scyldings." Grendel is a "dark death shadow, 
terrible demon, fiendish bale-bringer." There is moreover 
a distinct lack of proportion both in the sentence and in 
larger parts. The lengthy digressions, — for example, the 
minstrel's songs, — are utterly unsymmetrical in their rela- 
tions to the rest of the story. Again a use of contrast, 
though more in incident than in phrase, may be instanced 
in the lengthy contrast between Hygd, wife of Hygelac, and 
Thrytho, wife of Offa. One of the most distinguishing 
mannerisms of the Anglo-Saxon style is found in the con- 
stant use of understatement. Where we should say, "They 
lauded him to the skies," the compiler of Beowulf would 
modestly suggest, "Not at all blamed they him." He does 
not say, "Such is the work of a brave man," but "Such 
is no coward's work" ; not "They entertained him royally," 
but "Not at all deeds of guile did they at this time prepare." 

The poem shows clearly that it was handed down by 
word of mouth for generations before it was actually 
written. One proof of this fact is found in the number of 
versions of the same incident. Another evidence is the 
commingling of Christian and of pagan beliefs and ideals. 
The newly-spread Christianity so deeply influenced the later 
tellers of the Beowulf story that they often refer to Chris- 
tian teachings. As a result we frequently find Wyrd and 
the mythological gods curiously associated with the Creator. 

One unfailing source of interest in the poem is the 
reflection of many of the ethical ideals of the period. In 
Hygd, for example, we see the honored yet dependent posi- 
tion of woman as she goes about among her husband's guests 
at the feast. Again, after the death of Beowulf, the mes- 
senger in rebuking his tribesmen for their cowardice appeals 
to them by crying, 

"Death shall be better 
To each one of earls than a life of disgrace." 

Loyalty is thus qualified as a prime virtue. Beowulf 

Page Fifteen 




W\)e CoUcgc (greetingsf 




himself is the ideal of heroic bravery, while the aged 
Hrothgar is the type of a strict code of honor and of pride 
in the knowledge of that honor. 

In an unusually artistic way, the story centers about 
the hero. Little by little as the story progresses, his char- 
acter is unfolded in all its nobility of high ideals, of unsel- 
fishness, and of steadfastness of purpose. He is portrayed 
more by action than by description, or is the picture com- 
plete till the last tribute has been payed to his memory. 
He emerges from one struggle only the better prepared for 
the next, and at no time is he let rest on his fame. 

The writer attempts a dangerous thing when he goes 
on to a second, a third conflict, each complete in itself, but 
our interest never flags. As we pass from one highly 
organized description to another, there are always just 
enough odds against the hero to compel our attention and 
to strengthen our curiosity as to the final outcome. Each 
struggle is more intense, more portentious, more momentous 
than the last. The climax is reached in the conflict with 
the dragon, by which Beowulf although killing the fire- 
breathing monster meets his own death. At the end the 
story does not collapse. There is a gradual relaxation and 
a fitting close in the tribute to Beowulf : 

"So then lamented the folks of the Geats 
The fall of their lord, the hearth-companions, 
Said that he was a mighty king, 
Mildest to men and most tender-hearted, 
To his folk most kind and fondest of praise." 

L. I. 14. 

OPENING CHAPEL SERVICE 

At nine o'clock, Wednesday, Sept. 18, the students 
and faculty met in the Music Hall for the first chapel 
services for the scholastic year 1912-13. The regular order 
of service was followed. A short address was made by 
Page Sixteen 



ueeaimmmmmmmHUBmtaiBmam 



Cije College {greetings; 



President Harker defining most happily the true mission 
of a Christian college and laying special emphasis on the 
religious principles which had upheld it through Q6 years 
of real success to its present high development. Follow- 
ing this Mrs. Lambert welcomed the students, both new 
and old, comparing the present surroundings with those 
of her school days at I. W. C, when the six or eight fac- 
ulty members required as much room with their hoop 
skirts as do the long rows of faculty today. A special 
violin solo was exquisitely given by Director Swarthout, 
accompanied by Professor Donald Swarthout. The col- 
lege song was enthusiastically sung to a stirring accom- 
paniment. The chapel was well filled with the student 
body, the balcony being reserved for a large number of 
visitors. 

FACULTY NOTES. 

What have our faculty been doing this summer while 
the students were all industriously having a good time? 
Really, most of them were doing the same thing. Of 
course their ideals in that direction may differ slightly 
from those of the girls; for instance, Miss Nicholson 
thrived on four hours' practice a day. Miss Stevenson of 
the literary faculty and Mr. William P. Phillips of the 
musical faculty went abroad ; Miss Stevenson has returned 
to take up her work, but Mr. Phillips will continue his 
studies there. Miss Weaver enjoyed a delightful trip 
through the East and Canada. Among other things she 
attended the National Conference of the Board of Chari- 
ties and Correction, but what she most talks about was 
her visit "to Bosting. " We are glad to announce the 
new class in sociology taught by Miss Weaver. We know 
that Miss Neville came back to school ten days early, but 
what passed behind her closed doors remains a profound 
secret. Politically our faculty is a house divided against 

Page Seventeen 




Wi^t CoUese ^xtttixiQi 




itself. Miss Jennie Anderson was an enthusiastic Bull 
Moose supporter at the Progressive convention in Chi- 
cago. She did not, however, outdo Miss Tanner, who 
attended the Republican convention and later "cooled 
off" in Michigan. Miss Miller studied this summer and 
Mrs. Hartman was with friends in Boston, where she sang 
in several of the larger churches. Director Swarthout had 
a delightful tour through the northern part of the state, 
stopping to visit his mother at Pawpaw, and later motor- 
ing through Wisconsin and Ohio. Professor Donald 
Swarthout had a summer class in piano in Jacksonville. 
After a short vacation in the northern part of the state 
he returned in time to join his brother, Professor Max 
Swarthout, with Miss Beebee and Mrs. Taylor in Chau- 
tauqua work, and later to take up his work at Grace 
Church. Miss Cowgill's summer was quietly enjoyable. 
Miss Mary Anderson, Mrs. Colean, Miss Johnston, Miss 
Van Ness, Mrs. Kolp and Miss Knopf spent the summer 
chiefly in resting for another strenuous year. Miss Kidder, 
Miss Carter, and Miss Hay had a most interesting summer 
in the north at their summer homes. Miss Hutchinson did 
settlement work in Chicago and will teach this year at 
Kemper Hall. Miss McLaughlin traveled through Yellow- 
stone Park and Colorado, stopping at many interesting 
points. Miss Miner rested, trying to become strong 
enough to keep the rest of us strong. Miss Evans, the 
Gymnasium instructor, is to have the additional duties of 
assistant to Dean "Weaver. Miss Farrell is to have entire 
charge of the sewing department of the school of Home 
Economics. Miss Gillett will be ably assisted by Miss 
Campbell and Miss Watson. Miss Campbell will also 
take her degree in science this year while Miss Watson 
completes her course next year. We are glad to welcome 
Miss Beebe and Mrs. Taylor, who so pleased Jacksonville 
audiences in their Chautauqua work, as members of the 
musical faculty. Miss Dudley is the new head of the 

Page Eighteen 



Cfje College (greetings 



^^ 



geology department and Miss Parsons is assistant in ex- 
pression. Miss Berger and Miss Marshall are to have 
academy classes, the latter taking her A. B. this year. 

DEPARTMENTS. 

College of Music Notes. 

The College of Music opened with an enrollment 
greatly exceeding that of last year, and the prospects for 
a successful year in that department are most encour- 
aging. Despite the fact that the Faculty has been en- 
larged this year to meet the anticipated increase in the 
student body, it is more than likely that all of the differ- 
ent teachers will have exceptionally heavy schedules. 

Miss Beebe, who comes to us almost directly from 
London, where for some time past she has been pursuing 
her studies with the best English teachers, takes the place 
recently left vacant by Mr. Phillips, who is now abroad 
studying in Paris. Though the College of Music regretted 
greatly to lose the services of Mr. Phillips because of his 
unusual ability both as a teacher and an artist, the man- 
agement feels extremely fortunate in having secured for 
the vacancy one whose qualifications are such as to make 
certain the same high standard of work as was main- 
tained by Mr. Phillips. Miss Beebe 's ability comes to us 
recommended in the highest terms while her experience 
as a teacher covers a period of several years in colleges 
of the highest rank. Without doubt she will prove a 
strong addition to the Faculty. 

Mrs. Taylor, who comes as the teacher of the re- 
cently added course in Public School Music, brings with 
her an ability and experience which cannot but make for 
the best interests of the College. Though possessing a 
broad general musicianship so that she is fully able to 
assist in the teaching of both piano and voice, Mrs. Tay- 
lor's public work has been chiefly that of a vocalist, her 

Page Nineteen 




tE^t^ CoUegE (JlreetinsJS 




voice, which is a soprano, being of unusual range and 
quality. We bespeak for Mrs. Taylor as for Miss Beebe 
a most pleasant and happy affiliation with the College. 

The installation of the new organ in Music Hall has 
quite changed the appearance of the auditorium, and the 
I. W. C. can now lay claim to having one of the finest 
recital halls in the country. No little disappointment was 
felt on the opening day of the college this year in con- 
sequence of the organ not being ready for use. Through 
some misunderstanding the tuner for the instrument 
failed to arrive until it was too late to get the organ in 
readiness for the opening chapel service. However, in 
consequence of some exceedingly rapid work along the 
lines of regulating and tuning, the work of installation 
was soon completed and on October 4th, with Professor 
Donald Swarthout at the console the organ took its part 
for the first time in the regular chapel service. The organ 
is a two-manual instrument made by the Austin Organ 
Company of Hartford, Connecticut, and without doubt is 
one of the finest instruments in this part of the state. 
It possesses tubular-pneumatic action throughout and is 
equipped with all of the most modern devices for regis- 
tration and control, being in this respect vastly superior 
to any other organ in this vicinity. The College of Music 
feels under a lasting debt of gratitude to Dr. Welch for 
this splendid addition to its equipment. 

The informal Thursday afternoon students' recitals 
will soon commence, and judging from the showing made 
thus far by the students, the program will be of unusual 
merit and quality. It is to be hoped that the attendance 
from the student-body at these recitals will be even larger 
than was the case last year inasmuch as they are a splen- 
did help in the building up of general musicianship, that 
quality which all students of music should endeavor pri- 
marily to develop. 

Page Twenty 



tKfje College ([Ireetinsg 




School of Home Economics. 

The registration for the term is extremely gratifying. 
There are twenty in the second-year class, and twenty-one 
who have just entered. Of these, seven have registered 
for the B. S. degree course. We are pleased to see the 
increased appreciation of this line of work, and the de- 
mand for a more thorough preparation in it and to note 
the growing interest in the relation of woman to the bet- 
terment of the community. 

Of those who graduated from the department in June, 
four are teaching and three are planning to study this 
year. Edna Allison is at home; Lucile Allison is taking 
music ; Mayme Allison has returned to I. W. C. for fur- 
ther work, and Rhea Curdie is to go to the University of 
Illinois. Ella Neuman is teaching in Township High 
School in Tiskilwa, 111. ; Sidney Newcomb is teaching in 
Gibson City, 111. ; Elsa Richter has a position in the High 
School in Trinidad, Colorado, and Mary Watson has re- 
turned to I. W. C. to assist in the department. 

Jess Campbell is assisting in the department, also. 

Much as we regret the absence of Miss Grey, we feel 
that we are fortunate to have with us Miss Hortensia 
Farrall, who is a graduate of Simmons College, Boston, 
Mass. 

Miss Farrall will teach all of the Domestic Art work. 

The second year students are organizing a class for 
the purpose of extension work. They will condense the 
subject matter taken up in their daily recitations and 
prepare it for publication. 

Art and Expression 

The increased enrollments in the Schools of Expres- 
sion and of Fine Arts for the coming year are encouraging. 

Mildred Brown, art graduate, 1911, who has since 
studied in the Ceramic classes at the Chicago Art Insti- 

Page Twenty -one 







tute, has several very attractively executed pieces of china 
reproduced in the August number of the Ceramic studio, 
with working designs for same. Miss Brown is to be 
congratulated on her good workmanship and success. 

SOCIETY NOTES. 

''Our hearts, our hopes are all with thee. 
Our hearts, our hopes, our prayers, our tears, 
Our faith triumphant o'er our fears, 
Are all with thee, are all with thee." 

Such is the feeling in each Phi Nu heart as we again 
assemble and begin our work together. Although our 
plans for activities must necessarily be more limited this 
year, there is much that we can do toward development 
along other lines. We are going to try to take up the 
current topics of this modern age and shed some light 
upon puzzling subjects. Our main intention is to make 
the programs as instructive as they are interesting. 

During this year each girl will have more work and 
more responsibility. We want to work together for the 
best interests of both the Society and College, and we 
especially wish to co-operate, in every way we can, for the 
happiness and welfare of every girl. We know that in 
this year particularly the work we do and the efforts we 
make will be watched and aided by the old members who 
have left the college walls. Thus, we who are upon the 
scene of action feel we have their kindred love and loyalty 
in all that we do, for 

"A thread of blue will bind us e'en to eternity." 

The following officers were elected last Spring : 

President, Celia Cathcart. 

Vice President, Freda Sidell. 

Recording Secretary — Helen Moore. 

Corresponding Secretary, Elizabeth Dunbar. 

Chaplain, Lena Gummerson. ' 

Page Twenty-two 



Cije CoUege dlrcetings! 




Chorister, Mildred Weaver. 

Critic, Abbie Peavoy. 

Librarian, Anna Shipley. 

Ushers, Frances Freeman, Feril Hess. 

Prosecuting Attorney, Edna Hart. 

The Belles Lettres girls have returned with increased 
interest in their literary programs. Their course of study 
for the year is to be the history of the development of 
painting with special attention to Italian Art. The work 
for the year book is well on toward completion as the 
diligent committee have the programs made out for the 
entire course. 

The society is glad to welcome back their "new old" 
members. Sieverdena Harmel and Golden Berryman — 
the latter of whom has returned to I. W. C, to take her 
degree. 

The Belles Lettres officers for the year are : 

Emily Jane Allen, President. 

Nina Slayten, Vice President. 

Mona Summers, Recording Secretary. 

Ruth Taylor, Corresponding Secretary. 

Lois Coultas, Treasurer. 

Letta Irwin, I^ibrarian. 

Mary Ebert, Chorister. 

Helen Jones, Chaplain. 

Jeanette Powell, Critic. 

Flossie Fletcher, Sergeant-at-Arms. 

Freda Fenton and Helen Gahring, Pages. 

ALUMNI NOTES. 

Mrs. Bertha Wilson Hardinge, Class of '88, recently 
announced the engagement of her daughter Arline to 
Mr. Richard Bayard Taylor Kiliani, grandson of the dis- 

Page Twenty-three 



Kf)t College Greetings! 




tinguished man of letters whose name he bears. The mar- 
riage will take place in October and the happy couple will 
reside in New York in apartments facing the park of 
Columbia University. 

Mrs. Melinda Harrison Johnson, one of the two living 
members of the Class of '1852, now resides in Los Angeles, 
at 2204 West Twenty-fourth street. 

Miss Kate Blackburn, Class of '83, after spending 
part of the summer with her parents near Jacksonville, 
has returned to her educational work in Bulgaria, where 
she has spent some years as principal of a mission school 
for girls. 

During the recent session of the annual conference in 
Decatur, at the dinner given by the Education Committee, 
there were present a large number of I. W. C. graduates, 
among them Mrs. Edith Starr Haines, '01, Miss Maude 
Martin, '90, Mrs. Mary Stookey Randle, '76, Miss Etta 
Blackburn, '94, Miss Nannie Anderson, '76, Mrs. Belle 
Short Lambert, '73, Miss Margaret Reese Morrison, '81, 
Mrs. Ruby Brooks, Miss Olive Dunlop, '88. The last 
named is the National Field Secretary of the Woman's 
Home Missionary Society and represented the work of the 
organization in a most earnest and interesting way. 

Rev. Charles Morrison and his wife Margaret Reea 
Morrison, '81, have been appointed to pastoral work in 
Cerro Gordo. Rev. F. A. McCarty, whose wife Myrtle 
Abbott is of the Class of 1900, is the newly appointed 
Superintendent of the Jacksonville district. The College 
is glad that the change of duty from the pastorate of 
Centenary Church to the district will not remove Dr. and 
Mrs. McCarty from the city. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Harker Riddell [has gone with her 
husband from San Francisco to Carson City, Nevada, 
where they will remain for about a year. 

Page Twenty-four 



tIDtjc CoUcgc (Jlrcetingg 



m^ 



Y. W. NOTES. 

The first fruits of the summer's planning by the 
Y. W. C. A. cabinet were little welcome cards with dec- 
orative capitals found in the rooms of all new students. 

The party given for the new girls on the night of 
Saturday, September 21, was one of the most unique 
affairs of the kind ever given by Y. W. Each "old" girl 
had one or two "new" girls as her special guests. The 
programs, double-pointed pennants in design, contained 
on one side the letters W-E-L-C-0-M-E T-0 I.-W.-C, 
each of which was to be completed by the name of some 
girl of that initial. On the other side was the cast of 
characters for the event of the evening, a one-act farce 
giving the serious and comical side of cabinet meeting. 
The members of the cabinet represented their own depart- 
ments, burlesqing the real troubles of the cabinet and 
showing in a clever way some of the puzzling problems 
that come up before the Association. The famous Y. W. 
punch and wafers were served in the alcove of the front 
hall. 

For Sunday evening, September 22, special invita- 
tions and an enticing poster announced an unusual Y. W. 
meeting. The cabinet members, who were seated on the 
platform, gave short explanatory talks presenting the 
chief objects of their work and showing what it really 
means to be a Y. W. girl. Miss Freda Fenton sang. 

Our president is Helen Moore. 
She is kind to the very heart's core. 

The new girls all swear 

And stoutly declare 
They will her forever adore. 

Anne Shipley, vice president, next, 
A person who seldom is vexed. 
But if you should 

Page Twenty-five 



^\)t CoUege (^reetingsf 



Be bad and not good, 
She'll read yoii most sternly the text. 

There are three work hard for their living ; 
i, e. , Dunbar, and Campbell, and Linney. 

The first is the "Flunkie," 

The next wants your money, 
The last boosts methodical giving. 

And what about Hess and Frazee? 
Their job is by no means easy. 

With posters and parties. 

Pie sales and due teas, 
They cannot afford to be lazy. 

Now lastly come Cathcart and Irvin, 
Up-to-date and constantly stirrin', 

No matter how far 

Y. W. meeting's star, 
"Mission Study" is always occurin'. 

LOCALS. 

Bnoid Hurst, who was one of our students two years 
ago, made a short visit to her sister and friends before 
going to Oberlin, where she is doing work in the College 
of Music. 

Mary La Teer, a graduate of the Class of 1910, came 
back with her sister and two other new students to help 
them in their registration and to visit old friends. 

Nelle Smith and Norma Virgin were among the for- 
mer students with us for a short time in September. 

The old students have greatly missed Mrs. A. C. Met- 
calf and her little son George, during the first weeks of 
school. Mrs. Metcalf is visiting her sister, Mrs. George 
E. Atherton of Cincinnati. 

PBge Twenty-six 



Classy Styles We will be pleased to show you our line | 

a: 
s 

W. T. BEAUGH I 

s 
S 

Fashionable Footwear ! 

s 

3 

For All Occasions I 

33 South Side Square Jacksonville, 111. | 



The Old What Not: 



otto Speith 
pboto portrattutc 



Member Photographers Associaton of Illinois 



The Watson Studio Southwest Corner Square | 

IHIIHIIINnillllllllllMIMIIimil»lllinilllinMIMIIMIHIIIIIIIIIirUlinilllllliniHMIIHHH|IM<IIIIIH1MIHIItlllHIIHMIWIIIIU»IIIIMHnilliniUMIIIIHIIIIIinHIIIIMIMIHIII^ 



DR. KOPPBRL 

Dentist 



i 326 West state St. 



Dr. Albyn Lincoln Adams 

Oculist and Aurist 
to the State School for the Blind 

323 West State Street 



Practice limited to diseases of the 
E3'e, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 



October 23rd is Founders' Day, 
Our First Holiday 



Dr. R. R. BUCKTHORPE 

Dentist 

111. Phone, House 1054 

Office 750 
Bell Phone, Office 512 
Over Hatch Drug Store 

Jacksonville, 111. 



I DR. BYRON S. GAILBY 

I EYE 

I EAR 

I NOSE 

I THROAT 

I 340 West State Street 



Th? Colkiji? Girl 

The Summer winds were kind to you 
And left your face an Indian hue 
But when your school work you plan 
Of course you want to lose your tan. 
So use YARA Greaseless Cream 

25 cents the jar. 
Armstrong's Drug Store S. W. Cor- 
ner Square. 



DR. CARL E. BLACK 

Office— 349 E. State St. 
Both Phones 85 
Residence 1305 West State St. 

Both Phones 285 

Surgery — Passavant Memorial Hospital 

and Our Saviours Hospital 

Hospital Hours — 9:00 a. m. to 12 m. 

Office Hours — 1:30 to 4 p. m. Even- 
ings and Sundays by appointment 



^iiniMiMiMiiHMMiMiiiiMirnuHirnniiMiiiiniinMiiMiMtiMrMiiiiHninMiiirnitMiininiiniMiinMiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiniiiiHniiiiMHMiiiiiiiimiiiMiiiiiiiinimiiiiiiiiiniMiiMiH 



iiiHiiMiiiniiiuiiiiniiHiiMinMiM(HMiiiMiiniiiiMiiiiHiHMrnniHiiiMitiiriiriMii[iiriiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiijiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

It is our business to get new goods for you | 

We are never fully satisfied with our stock, but keep con- | 

stantly adding to it in order that no customer's needs may be over- | 

looked. Besides we believe it our duty to be forever watchful of | 

the markets and so secure "EVERYTHING" and "THE BEST" | 

We do not depend on onlyone line to make a profit — hence | 

can sell cheaper. | 

A complete line of Drugs and Groceries | 

>on«800 K^ODBIBI^TS BK^OS. Phones 800 1 

Open every working day and night. | 

29 South Side Sq. I 



Pat was leading" a cow down the street, but on his 
stopping" to speak with Mike the cow got loose and start- 
ed off. Pat started in pursuit, and on Mike's asking" 
where he was going, shouted back, "Don't know. Ask 
the cow." 



h Womdn's Store 

niled witri the Luxuries and Necessities wliicli appeal | 

to ttie heart of every woman | 

Advanced Styles at I 

Moderate Prices | 

We take a pride in proclaiming" that we have the I 

lightest, brightest store in the State of Illinois, filled by I 

a rapidly changing stock of attractive merchandise, and | 

catering" ever to the wants of young women. | 

Coats Suits Dresses Costumes | 

Waists Gloves Hosiery Jewelry I 

Laces Ribbons Corsets Neckwear | 

Linens Notions Art Goods Handkerchiefs | 

tADieS'AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. | 

illlUillililliiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiilllliiiini iniiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 1 1 1 tiiiiir iiM::ii;i!ii:i>:.;!iii;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiM;iiiMi.ijiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiifii||| 



iMtlHHIHMIUIIIIIUIIIIIIUIIIMIIIIIHIIIIIIHMHIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIMIHIIIIMIIIIMHIIIMHIIIIIIIUIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIMIHIIIIIMIIIIIIinilllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIWIMIIIM^ 

I GEO. T. DOUGLAS 

I Fancy Groceries 



234 West State St. 



738 East North St. 



"Here," beg-an a woman, "is an article on 'Women's 
Work for the Feeble-minded." 

Her husband gfrunted, being" in a reactionary mood. 
"I'd like to know," he said, "what women have ever 
done for the feeble-minded?" 

"They usually marry them, dear," replied his wife 
sweetly. 



Jacksonville's Largest Mens' Store 

Pennants and Banners 

I. W. C. and Fraternity special designs 

Mannish Cut Sweater Coats 

Hand Bag's, Trunks 

and Suits Cases 



GIRLS 

Have you seen our bab}' — 
it is awfully cute. 
This space next month will 
tell you where to see it. 



«IMIItlllllllllHIIIIMIHHI|IMtlHnMIHIIIIIIIII|IHIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIHIIMIIIIMIIMIMIIIIIIIM)aU"MII"ll"l">H>ll)"l*<'""**MM"HlllltllUII"M>*<^ 



PACIFIC 

Jacksonville's Best and most 
Popular 

HOTEL 

The Home of the Traveling Man 
Jno. B. Snell, Prop. 
Rates I2.25, I2.50, and $3.00 per dty 
One Block West of Womans College 
Opposite Post Office 
Rooms with or without bath 
Local and Long Distance Telephone 

in every room. 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



£)HIIIIIIIIIIHIHHIMIIIHIIUllllllMllllllllllllMMIllllllllllllllHinililllllllllllllllinillllllllllllllillllllllllllllllMIIIIIIII 

I SKIRT boxe:s I 

I ROCKERS. SCREENS, DESKS j 

I AND BED ROOM CURTAINS | 

I AT I 

iJohnson, Hackett & Guthrie! 



On Halloween night, the new g"Irls may expect to 
learn their future fates, see g*hosts walk, visit witches' 
lonely caves — in short, pass an evening- dedicated only to 
spooks and general hilarity. 



j KODAK FINISHING 
jVulcan Roll Films 
I Cameras from $2.00 up 

lEverything- strictly first class 

t Claude B. Vail 

iOswald's Drug Store 71 E. Side Sq. 



|Frank Elliott, Prea. Wm. R. Routt, Vice-Pres. 

I C. A. Johnson, Cashier 

= J. AUerton Palmer, Asst, Cashier 

I J. Weir Elliott, Asst. Cashier 



lELLIOTT STATE BANK 

i Jacksonville, 111, 



I Capital 

I Undivided Profits 

i Frank Elliott 

I J. Weir Elliott 

i Wm. R. Routt 

§ Wm. S. EUoitt 



$100,000 
- I 15,000 

Frank R. Elliott 
John A. Bellatti 
C. A. Johnson 



Piepenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 

HERE TO PLEASE 

Candies Cakes 

Cookies Pies 

Sandwiches Pop on Ice 

Groceries California Fruits 
School Supplies 



Girls 

Don't forgfet our Advertisers 



aUtlUiUIUUIIUMIIIIIIIIMItllllMIIIIMHIIIIIinllllll HMIIIIIIIIIItMIIMIIIMIIIUMIIIIIIIIMHIIIIMIHIItMIIIMIHIilllilllllilllMMIillMIHIIUIIIilllHIiilllllilllllUIMIIUIUMHIIIIIIIU^ 



^iMNiHinHunininiiiHniuiiniiuiNiiiniiNiniiiiiinniiniiuniniiiiininiHiniiiiiiiiiiiuiiimiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiMiiiiiMiH 

I The bride's first choice for the home? | 

I House Furnishings of Quality I 

I from the I 

I ANDRE & ANDRE Store | 

I Our Special Room Furnishings will interest every student [ 



Be noble! and the nobleness that lies 
In other men, sleeping" but never dead, 
Will rise in majesty to meet thine own. 



Lowell. 



jHOFFMAN'S 

I Lunch Room 

I opposite Depots 

I 609-611 East State Street 

I Jacksonville, 111. 



Len G. Magill 
Printer 



East State Street 111. Phone 418 \ 



Montgomery & Deppe 

Eve:rything in Dry Goods 
Well Lighted First Floor Cloak and Suit Room 

Agents for the Ladies Home Journal Patterns 
The new "Howd" front laced corsets 



f;iiUiiiiui|iUj|iiMlMM)>iMi)UiiliMiii"HiiiiinHiiiiiiiMinnniiiiiNiiMiMMiMiiNinMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiMiiiMiiiiiiiiiiuiiinMiiiiiMiiiiiMiiiiniiiiiiMi^ 



::MiiniiHiiiHniiiiMiiiiiiiiiMiiiimHHiniMiMiMiiHiiiimiiiiMiHniiHirHiMniiiniiiMiiniiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiNiiiiiniininiiiiiiiiiiiiniiHiiHiHiiiiiiiHniiniMiniiiiniiiiniiiMiMiiMMii^ 




FALL Footwear 

OUR SPECIALTY I 

Dress Slippers I 

Street Shoes I 

5?droom Slippers I 

We Repair Shoes | 

h:o:p:pe3e^s I 



Translated by Miss K. in Virg-il class: 
Dido (weeping" as she watches Aneas sail away): 
"Well, by Jove! there he goes." 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Fancy Bazaar 
and Millinery 

211 West State Street 



yAYLOR^S 



Grocery 

A good place to trade 



221 West State Street 



MiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiniiiiiriiiniiiiitiiiiiii 



Illinois Phone 419 Bell Phone 417 

A. L. Bromley 

Ladies' Tailor 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and 
Repairing. I^adies' Man Tail- 
ored Suits to order. Remodeling 
of all kinds. Special rates to 
I. W. C. students. All work 
called for and delivered promptly 



GAY'S 

RE^LIABLE 

HARDWARE 



iiuniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiMiMiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiMMiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiii 



[jMiiiiiHHiiiiiiiiiMHiiiHiiiiii|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiii?iniiiiiiiiiniiiiiMiMtHiiiMiinMHiinMiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiHiHiiiiiHMiiitniiiiiiiinitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiniiHiH 

I College Jewel rv 

I Engraved Cards and Invitations 

I Chating Dishes, Copper and Brass Goods 
I Special Die Stationeiv 

I 21 South Side Square 



Heard in the History Class: 

^. What were Marston Moor and Naseby? 

A. Two famous generals in the hundred years war. 




Established 1890 

Low Prices Square Dealing' 
Keep us busy 



111. Phone 57 Bell Phone 92 

Fresh Drugs, 
Fancy Goods 
Stationery 



H 



I Badfl6r Drug Store 

I a doors West of Postoffice 

I 235 R, State Street 

^liniHIHIIIII IIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIM IMIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIirillMIIIIIIIIII Illlll 



Florence Kirk King- 
Hair Dresser 

Now prepared to manufact- 
ure French hair and combings 
into the 1912-1913 styles. 

Shampooing and scalp mas- 
sage by appointment at your 
residence. 

Illinois Phone 837 
Residence 503 West College Street 



If only you'll 

Remember Cherry's 

We'll be pleased, and we 
know positively that you'll 
find no cause for complaint. 

Our horses are safe; our equi- 
pages have character and in- 
dividitality, and our prices are 
most reasonable. 

Cherry's Livery 



Both Phones 



Jacksonville, 111. 



IIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIh^ 



3afe 



Confectionary 



Ipieacock tnn 



Catcrinof 



Soda 



Candies 



And to be wroth with one we love 
Doth work like madness in the brain. 

Coleridg'e. 



Oswald's 

Drug Store 

71 East Side Sq. 

TOILET ARTICLES 

PERFUMES 
FINE STATIONERY 



L,adies' High Grade, Late Style 
FUR SCARFS and MUFFS 

ARE SOLD BY 

Frank Byrns 

Most Reasonable Prices 



E. A. SCHOKDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

330 East State St. Jacksouville, 111. 
Illinois Phone 388 



Pictorial Review Patterns 

For Sale at 



CZ 




l7/mon4 



DRY GOODS STORt: 



luiMiMiiiiiiniii mmiHiiHmiHHiHHiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiHHmiiHiiiniiHmimiiiMiiHniiiiiMiiHimiitH"""'"""'""'"''''""'""'" '•""""•""i"""'""'"'""'^ 



It will pay you to visit 

SCHRAM'S 

Jewelry Store 



Ques. What work will Miss R. take this year? 
2nd year Prep. The E^quanomical Course, 



iFancy Articles Christmas Goods 

! COOVER & SHREVK'S 
I Drug Store 



Kodaks and Supplies 

Developing and Finishing 



I Dmm Markei) 

I AI.I. KINDS OF FRESH and 
I SAIvT MEATS, FISH, 
I POUI.TRY, ETC. 

I Both Phones 196 230 W. State St. 



COOK 

LIGHT with GAS 

HEAT 

Jacksonville Railway & 
Ivig'ht Company 

224 South Main Street 



Ask your grocer for 

HOLSUM 

BREAD 

Made Clean. Delivered clean 
in waxed paper wrappers 



FilMiinMinMuiiriniiinHiiiiniMiMiiiiiiiNinuNiiiiiiniiitMiiiiiiriiiMiiniMnMiiiMiiniinHiiiiinnnMinniniuMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiJiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriMiiiiiiiiii! 



inHHinriiniHitiiniiuMiiiiniiiiiiiMi:w!niMiuiMiiiinriiMiMMiii;iii[nriiMniiiiiiinMiiMriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiniiiMiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiMiiiriiiiiMiiiiiiiiiMiiiiniiiiniHinii| 

For those who discriminate \ 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to § 

please the students who come to our city. We select only the | 

best materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. | 

Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and | 

Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. | 

Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all | 

College functions. | 

Vickery 3c Merrigan I 

C3A.XEREI=IS I 

227 West State Street | 



Miss Hay: "That little g-irl has the Tanner fever, 
judg-ing- from the way she talks." 

Miss Tanner: "Would you like her to have the 
Hay Fever?" 



Hillerby's 

Dry Goods Store 

Safest Place 
to Trade 



The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital . . . $200,000 
Surplus . , 32,000 

Deposits . . . 1,100,000 

[J. S. Depository for Postal Saving Bank 

Julius B. Strawn, President 
Miller Weir, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear 

H. J. Rogers, A. A. Curry 

C. B. Graff 



Brady Brothers I 

Hardware, Cutlery | 

Paints i 



C. S. MARTIN 

Fine Pictures — Artistic Framing 

Frames and Ovals of all 

descriptions and sizes 

Imported and Domestic 

Wall Paper 

314 W. state St., Scott Block 
Jacksonville, 111. 



HitUiiiuiiiiiMHiiuiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiHiiniiiiiiiinMiMiriiiiiiiiiiinuiiiniiiiininiiniiiiuiiiniMiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiuiuiiuiiuuiiiniui(iHiHiiiuiuiiu 



glllllllHIIIIIIIIHIIHriirilllllMIMHIIIIIinHnillllllllMtllllinilllMllllinMIIIIIIIIIIIHIIHHIMIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIItllllMlllllllllltlHtllllllllllllllinHHItMIIIII 

I The most dainty things in Ring-s and Jewelry. 

I New and handsome styles of g-oods in Sterling- Silver 

I Hig-hest grades of Cut Glass, and every 

I description of Spectacles and E)ye Glasses 

I Fine Diamonds a Specialty 

I at 

I RUSSE:]:vL& LYON'S 

I West Side Square 

I Both Phones 96 



Early in October the new pipe org-an will be dedi- 
cated. 



I Mathis, Kamm & Shibe say 

I We can furnish your 

I Shoes and Party Slippers 

I in the popular styles, 

I leathers, and 

i fabrics 



F. E. Farrell E. E. Crabtree 

Established 1864 

P. G. FARRELL & CO. 

BANKERS 

Successors to First National Bank 
Jacksonville, 111. 




mm 




KNGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 



SiMniiinMiMiiHMiiiiininiMiiiiiHttiHHnniiMiiiiMiiiiiiiiHiiiMiiiiiMniHMHitiiHiMiiHiHHtiiitinMtiiniiniHiiiMiiiiuiiinnNtrmiiiiminmiHnnuiHmmn^ 



MiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiMiiMiiiinMiiiiiiiiMiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiNiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiniiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiuiiiiiMiiiMiiiiiii£ 



A. OBERMEYER 



HARRY P. OBERMEYER I 



CITY DRUG AND BOOK STORE 

Stationery, Pennants, Novelties, Drug's and 
TOILET REQUISITES 

Quality Counts — We Count 
•hones: Illinois 572, Bell 457 Corner South Main St: and Square 



We owe many valuable observations to people who 
are not very acute or profound, and who say the things 
without effort which we want and have long- been hunt- 
ing" in vain" — Emerson. 



KRRY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO. 

Designs, Cut Flowers, 
Plants 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

Greenhouses, Bell 775 



THE SATISFACTION 
we enjoy through selling you 

OUR FINE SHOES 

is equaled only by 

YOUR SATISFACTION 

in wearing them 

Evening Slippers 

Jas. McGinnis & Co. 

62 East Side Square 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING 

for the latest in Suits, Ladies' Underwear, Ribbons 

Laces, Embroidery Materials or Notions 

Visit the store that carries the 

up-to-date merchandise 

F=HEL-F=»© <& OSBORISIE 



iMiiiiiMiiinniMiiMiiniMiinimiiuiiiiniiMHimiiiMiiiimimiiiminiiMiiiuiiimHiHiHHMinHimiiimniMimMiiimimMiiinimiuininiMiHiiiiMmiiimiiMinuiiiiiiiiK 



^iiHuiiiiiiiiiinuMuiiiiiMiiiiiiiiinMiiiinnniiiiiiMuniiiiiMiiiNiiiiiMiiiiMHiMiHiiiiiHiiiiiiHiMiiiiiiiiiininMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiHiniiiiiiiiiiiimimiimiiiimiMi^^^^ 



SHEE^T MUSIC, MUSIC MERCHANDISER 

TALKING MACHINES, RECORDS 

AND SUPPLIES 

19 SOUTH SIDE PUBUC SQUARE 



Haven't you enjoyed this number of the Greeting-s, 
and aren't you anxious for the next? 



Capital 
$200,000 

Surplus 
$50,000 

Deposits 
$1,000,000 

POUNDED 1852 








The combined capi" 
tal and surplus of this 
bank is 

One Quarter 
Million 
Dollars 

the largest of any bank 
in Morgan County. 

UNITED STATES 
DEPOSITORY 



OFFICERS 
M. F. Dunlap, Presideat O. F. Buffe, Cashier 

Andrew Russel, Vice President R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashier 

R. M. Hockenhull, Vice President H. C. Clement, Asst. Cashier 

C. G. Rutledge, Vice President 



DIRECTORS 
George Deitrick 
R. M. Hockenhnll 
M. F. Dunlap 



I Owen P. Thompson 
I Edward F. Goltra 
I John W. Leach 
?iniiiHiMiiiniMiiiMiiinniiniiMiiiniiiMmMiiniiiiiiiniiiiMiMiunHiiiuHiiiiiiiniMMniMiiMiniiiiiinnuimiinmMiiinunmniniiiMiiiiminiuiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiimiiiiiiMiii 



Harry M. Capps 
O. F. Buffe 
Andrew Russel 



?!rf)e College Greetings 

<| The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College, 
fjf Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of ail departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month. 

<| Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advatice. Single 
copies 15c. 
<| Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 



Contents 

Auid Lang Syne 3 

Going Fishing 4 

A Cloud in the West 7 

A Drive in March .... 8 

x\ Quiet Sunday 9 

Editorial 11 

Calendar 13 

Dedication of Organ 17 

Class Events 19 

Departments 22 

Society Notes 25 

Alumnae , 27 



oh, good gigantic smile o' the 

brown old earth, 
This autumn morning! How he 

sets his bones 
To bask i' the sun, and thrusts 

out knees and feet 
For the ripple to run over 

in its mirth. 

— Brozv)ii)ip- 




gbe College (greetinQe 

Vol. XVI Jacksonville, 111 , November, 191a No. 2 

Faculty Committee— Miss Weaver, Miss Tanner, Miss Neville 
Editor -Lois M. Coultas 

Associate Editors— Elizabeth Tendick, Letta Irwin, Mary Lawson 
Business Managers— Elizabeth Dunbar, Emily Jane Allan, Helena 
Munson 



AULD LANG SYNE. 

(It is a pleasure that we can have in our Greet- 
ings this month a contribution from one of the alumnae.) 

Ever will maids be maids in their love for some bits 
of vanity that they deem will adorn their toilet or enhance 
their youthful charms. Even in the scholastic halls of 
I. W. C. has this spirit sometimes been discovered. Not 
only has it been apparent among the young women of this 
twentieth century college life, but also among the demure 
damsels of half a century ago were such feminine fancies 
wont to display themselves in various little ways. 

To Mrs. Martin Kingman of Peoria who, as Emaline 
Shelby, spent two years in the college during President 
Adams' administration, we are indebted for the following 
incident of her student life. 

Among the girls of those days were some who liked 
to powder a little, or put on a bit of color, or a beauty 
patch, or add a frill or furbelow, so President Adams felt 
called upon to talk one morning in chapel on the sin of 
vanity, and counseled the young ladies to be less worldly 
minded and to dress more plainly. 

Naturally enough the girls discussed their preceptor's 
remarks among themselves, the without agreement with all 
his ideas and ideals. But in order that they might seem to 

Page Three 




ZE^ijt CoUcge ^reetinsff 




have profited by the advice so kindly given they quietly 
determined that on the following Saturday night they 
would go down to supper dressed as plainly as he might 
approve. 

The plan was well carried out and an astonished fac- 
ulty beheld a transformed company with prim decorum 
file into the dining room that night. The huge hoop skirts 
universally worn were left off, letting the skirts fall in 
heavy, clinging folds; kerchiefs were folded about the 
neck and across the breast in Quaker fashion ; hair, which 
in those days was worn parted and smoothly brushed down 
over the ears, was drawn back with a little tighter twist 
and into a harder knot. Thus speedily had his pupils been 
converted to his will and yet no word of approval — ^no com 
mendation in tone or glance came from President Adams. 
"Without such encouragement it was not strange that the 
vanities should next day be restored to favor and that 
girls should be girls again. 



GOING FISHING. 

"As we were planning last winter we'll get ready and 
go fishing tomorrow. I've just seen Will Hardy and he 
says he's had word from the river that the bass are 
biting as fast as you can throAV in your bait,' said dad 
one hot summer evening. 

"Fine, dad. I'll be ready to start at five. Is that 
early enough?" As I answered, visions of the writing of 
long overdue letters, of the making of a new jabot, of the 
reading of a favorite book, slipped through my mind and 
fled ingloriously. All summer had I known that summons 
was coming, yet like all dire calamities it came alto- 
gether without warning. I could be enthusiastic to any 
degree necessary when dad, hot and tired, returned from 
a fishing trip, his basket filled with freshly dressed fish. 
The size, the relative merits of bass and croppy, the dis- 
Page Four 



tE^fje College <!lreeting£f 




tribution among his friends, all met with a ready and 
responsive interest. That too well feigned interest had 
resulted in this plan to take me along and teach me how 
it was done. 

The next morning, true to my agreement, I was ready 
Avhen dad called me. Such a discussion as there was as 
we drove to the river! Dad's friend insisted that arti- 
ficial bait was the only thing that should be uSed for 
successful bass fishing, while dad contended that exper- 
ienced fishermen never thought of using anything but 
live craw fish for bait. As I noted the technical terms 
they used, and tried to find a safe place for my feet 
between the tackle boxes, landing nets, minnow buckets 
and poles of several sizes and materials, I wondered if 
fishing were the simple sport I had always supposed. A 
barefooted boy with a torn straw hat, a bent pin on the 
end of a stick and a long string of shining fish was my 
unsophisticated idea of the sport. 

Not so was dad's, for, when we had finally reached 
the river and were settled in; a dirty little boat that I 
was sure would leak, he turned to me saying, ''Now here 
is one of the very finest steel rods made. Just fit it 
together and you'll find a line in the right hand corner of 
the second tray in that green tackle box. If you want 
to fish for croppy you'd better use those small hooks in 
the wooden box in lower left hand corner of the box Will 
has; if you're going to fish for bass, you'll have to use a 
larger hook. They're in that tackle box just behind you. " 

I didn 't want to fish for either ; but finally, I managed 
to gasp, '^Why— I guess I'll try the bass." 

That 's right ! Go after the gamiest fish in the water. 
Then you'll have something worth while." 

I wasn't so sure about what I should have as I bal- 
anced myself on one Imee in the wobbly boat and searched 
about in that little box for the right kind of a hook to 
catch the gamiest fish. Next came the baiting of the 

Page Piye 



^fit CoUesc ^xtttinQi 




jagged little hook that wiggled around in the air at the 
end of a slender cord. 

"Now, Emma, you might just as well learn to bait 
your hook right now. Dip your hand into that pail of 
minnows and catch a good sized one. ' ' After many dashes 
and much splashing, I caught one of the required size. 

"Don't hold it like that. It'll slip out of your hand. 
Now, catch it through the back with the hook. It'll live 
longest put on that way." 

"But doesn't it hurt it terribly?" I ventured. 

"Don't bother about that, just tend your pole and 
don't tangle your line in that pile of driftwood." 

For hours we did tend strictly to the business of 
fishing. By those two men not a word was spoken, save 
such suggestions as, "Pull to the east," "Drop your line 
in there," "Row down to the Narrows," "Look out for 
that driftwood on the right." 

To all intents they had forgotten me, and all their 
notions about teaching me to fish. Hour after hour I had 
trailed that line through the water, watched that lifeless 
bobber remain serenely on the surface of the water, kept 
a lookout for driftwood (usually after my line was caught 
in it), examined my bait to make sure it was still alive; 
then the agony of changing it ! Of all the slippery crea- 
tures imaginable, a minnow must surely be the worst. 
Just when I was silently pitying myself most sympa- 
thetically, I felt a sudden pull. Without a glance at my 
line I began, "Dad, oh dad, I've got a bite. Oh! I'U bet 
it's a big bass." 

"Be careful there ! Give him time ! Play him easy!" 

"But I'm afraid he'll get away. Oh" — for with my 
sudden jerk there was a snap and that beautiful rod was 
bent at its carefully tapered end. 

"Well, that's nice!" was all dad said, but I did not 
care to look at him just then. 
Page Six 




Wbt CoUege (greeting^ 



"Here, let ivie help you a bit," offered dad's friend. 
In some way, broken rod and all, he managed to land that 
bass, five pounds at least. I was sure. 

As I turned to look, the friend laughed, as he said 
to dad, "Good substitute for a bass, that. It's nothin' but 
a dog-fish." 

Dog-fish? Honest dad? Why it's no good for any- 
thing. Oh! dear, I thought — and my beautiful rod is 
broken — just for an old dog-fish you'll have to kill." 

"Never mind," answered dad, as he began putting 
another rod together for me, "You must learn to take 
fisherman's luck. We'll hope for better luck next time." 

Nevertheless, my five pound bass is still safe in his 
home beneath the driftwood, safe until next summer 
brings my next fisiiing trip. 

— JANETTE POWELL. 

A CLOUD IN THE WEST. 

All day the sun had glared down upon the parched 
earth. The still air seemed weighted down with the heat. 
Everywhere there was the feeling of languid expectancy 
of some impending calamity. The flowers felt it as they 
drooped their heads beneath their weight of dust. The 
birds felt it and were quiet. Even the brown dust in the 
road beyond the dry, gray rail fence seemed filled with it. 
The mirror of a pond with its frame of cat-tails over in 
the meadow sent back the glare of the sun. 

Suddenly, in the west, a great cloud began to rise. 
It climbed and climbed until as its shadows widened, the 
leaves and flowers stirred in whispers to each other. The 
sun turning the edges of the cloud to white foam tried 
in vain to keep it back. Still it rose until the whole sky 
was darkened by a solid gray veil. Then the rain drops 
began to fall, very slowly at first. As they stirred the 
dust it rose in little columns all along the road. The 

Page Seven 



tE^ije CoUege (Greetings; 




flowers lifted their heads joyfull)' but drooped as they 
were struck by the heavy rain drops. 

The pond was wrinkled by innumerable circles. The 
rain now^ fell in sheets that lifted now and then to give a 
glimpse of the bill beyond w^here the thunder seemed at 
war with itself. Now and then when the sky was split 
from dome to horizon by a jagged flash of lightning, a 
loud crash of thunder instantly answered the challenge, 
then rolled aw^ay and died out in a mutter of defeat. 

The pond received gratefully the steady downpour 
while the road became a running river, when suddenly 
the rain stopped as quickly as it had come. But it was 
only for a moment; then it began again, steadier and 
harder than ever. Finally the downpour slackened, then 
stopped entirely. For a moment all nature seemed awed 
into the silence that was broken only now^ and then by 
the retreating thunder. 

MONA SUMMERS, '15. 

<^ 

A DRIVE IN MARCH. 

It was about as much as the two strong farm horses 
could do, to gain the top of the hill. When, at last they 
reached it with a mighty effort, I leaned back with a sigh 
of relief. I had been sitting on the edge of my seat, 
every nerve and muscle tense, watching the hard pull. 
Even the light spring w^agon sank hub deep in the black 
mire, making travel so diiflcult that out of sympathy for 
the horses I was almost ashamed to add any weight to 
their load. 

A long black road stretched before us, its rough, 
irregular surface relieved here and thereby pools or large 
puddles of water. As there M^as nothing aside from these 
to break the monotony of the slow drive, I lazily fell to 
M^atching the wheels as they turned laboriously in response 
Page Eight 



winiiM ni ii rr iffl i i i Mi ii « M ii iiii n i '«"'«^««"«M"wimffiiw^^ 



Sf)e CoQege <@reetmg£( 




to the horses 's plodding. Each spoke came out of the 
sticky mud loaded with a bulky mass which tumbled 
heavily off as the wheel turned on around. There was 
amusement in watching this clumsy ferris wheel and in 
listening to the crackling noise made by the mud. As I 
wondered at the depth to which the road bed had been 
cut, I smiled skeptically to think of the machines speed- 
ing over these same roads within a few months. At 
present such a thing seemed utterly impossible. 

Busy with these thoughts, I was wholly unprepared 
when, with a quickened pace, the team splashed carelessly 
through a mud hole. Before I could draw back, I re- 
ceived a good supply of muddy water full in my face. 
While I sputtered and blinked, a sudden jolt almost 
pitched me out into the soft road, as the horses ambled 
into a mammoth rut, then jerked out with unfeeling 
energy. When I recovered my balance and breath, we 
had turned the corner around an old rail fence and were 
starting in on a stretch of clay, which was just wet 
enough to splash nicely. Here, I decided, that if I wanted 
to be recognized, it would be wise to stop speculating 
upon the wonders of nature and learn to dodge the danc- 
ing mud. FREDA SIDELL, 15. 

A QUIET SUNDAY. 

The family had given themselves over entirely to 
enjoying the luxury of a Sunday afternoon alone. 

"I really feel out of place in this rocker," remarked 
Elizabeth, ''I'm not used to such ease. It's all very well 
to have artistic mottoes over the fireplace, but ours surely 
has never proved a blessing, 'Ye ornaments of a home 
* * *,' sounds well, but I declare there is such a thing 
as having too many ornaments." 

"Elizabeth, is that my daughter speaking?" Her 
mother started to remonstrate, but her courage failed, as 

Page Nine 



tKfje CoUtse (jlrcetingg 



from the davenport the sound of heavy, regular breathing 
told that the head of the house enjoyed a quiet Sunday 
' ' unornamented. ' ' 

However sleeping fathers and protesting mothers who 
tried to keep up the family reputation of hospitality left 
Elizabeth undaunted. 

"You know, mother," she insisted with energetic con- 
viction, "what a relief it was not to have a big fuss over 
dinner. Who cares if there aren't any left overs for 
lunch? Helen, put down your book. It's a rare privilege, 
my dear, to have a confidential chat w4th your family. ' ' 

Her sister gradually closed the book. "What do 
you want me to talk about?" she asked. Then looking 
out of the window she noted people passing by. "There's 
a nice little family coming up the street. Out for a 
Sunday walk, I suppose." Then she gasped. The nice 
little family, a man, a woman, a small boy, a still smaller 
girl and a baby at the go-cart stage, had paused at the 
stone steps — had paused and then ascended. 

It was the long suffering, but ever gracious mother 
that answered the summons of the bell. After much ex- 
planation, she reappeared in the living room with her 
guests, but it took the entire family to rouse the sleeping 
father and explain that Sister Margaret's daughter had 
arrived. In a dazed tone he greeted them. Sister Mar- 
garet? Did he ever have a Sister Margaret? When and 
where? Gradually he so far sensed the situation that by 
the time the children had all been commented upon most 
favorably by the Western relatives, he was ready to 
assure the guests how welcome they were. He rose so 
far to the demands of the situation that he allayed all 
doubts, being confident that some one could be found to 
attend to the baggage even if it was Sunday. 

Days later — it might have been weeks as far as feel- 
ings were concerned — the "nice little family" departed. 

Page Ten 



tIDfje CoUege <@rcetings; 




Of course it had been a real pleasure to have them; of 
course it had been no trouble to move the beds so that 
the children could be in the same room. It wasn't at all 
extra to make lemonade from sunrise to sunset, in the 
land of fruit. Still before commencing the task of read- 
justing, the little mother dropped in an easy chair in the 
living room to get a better hold on herself. Her tired 
eyes saw at once the new scratch on the floor and the 
little finger prints on window panes and polished furni- 
ture. Then she glanced toward the mantle. The back 
of a framed picture greeted her. Some sympathetic hand 
had turned the cherished motto. Guests might be orna- 
ments, but of this fact the public was evidently to be 
kept in ignorance. All rules of hospitality bade her 
change it immediately, but for a moment she hesitated. 
A little smile played over her face. Guiltily she turned 
to see whether or not she had been observed. No one 
was near, but from the regions above the sound of her 
daughters' voices reached her in earnest discussion as to 
just which room should be made ready for the guest that 
was to arrive on the morrow. 

ARLENE HAMMEL, '15. 

EDITORIAL. 

It is interesting to note the growing recognition of 
woman as a factor in present day history and her increas- 
ing capability to cope with the problems that seventy-five 
years ago were considered beyond her powers of intelli- 
gence. To the change that has been gradually taking 
place in woman's position in the world, Dr. Harker called 
our attention in a recent chapel address. This summer 
he reminded us the new emperor of Japan, contrary to 
the custom of his people from the earliest time, has decreed 
that the empress shall, on all state occasions, ride with 
him in the carriage. The change in the attitude of the 

Page Eleven 




tBiit CoUcge <§reetins£f 



Japanese toward women denotes a decisive step forward 
for the Oriental world. 

This summer, too, for the first time in over four hun- 
dred years, a Catholic university has conferred higher 
degrees upon sixteen of its women students. 

In no way is this growing interest in woman's educa- 
tion limited to young women for last June, from the 
Nebraska Wesleyan University were graduated a mother 
and her son. This same spirit is evident in another case 
— in the University of Wisconsin Mrs. A. D. Winship, a 
woman of eighty years is working for her degree. 

As woman's outlook has broadened her sense of re- 
sponsibility has increased. Though it is impossible to deny 
that she has made mistakes, still she has brought about 
definite results. Now it is not unusual to find woman the 
leading spirit in civic and social improvement. No unim- 
portant thing has she accomplished in regard to adul- 
terated foods, in the effort of cleaning up towns, and in 
the task of caring for the homeless child and the child in 
the wrong environment. Thus her advance in education 
has by no means ministered to a selfish appropriation of 
culture. 

The Greetings Sworn Statement made under the new 
postal law. 

Statement of the ownership and management of The 
College Greetings, published monthly, from October to 
June inclusive, at Jacksonville, required by the Act of 
Aug. 24, 1912. 

Editor — Lois M. Coultas. 

Assistant Editors — Letta Irvin, Elizabeth Tendick, 
Mary Lawson. 

Business Managers — Elizabeth Dunbar, Emily Jayne 
Allen, Helena Munson. 

The College Greetings is not owned by a corporation. 
Page Twelve 




Cfjc CoUege Greetings; 




it is not mortgaged, and it makes no charge for any edi- 
torial or other reading matter printed as news. 
COLLEGE GREETINGS, 
By Elizabeth Dunbar, Manager. 
Sworn and subscribed before me this 3d day of Octo- 
ber, 1912, 

(Seal) Wm. A. Fay, Notary Public. 

LOCAL CALENDAR. 

Sept. 20. The Illinois Woman's College Guild of 
Jacksonville assisted by the ladies of the various churches 
was at home to the faculty and students at a most charm- 
ing afternoon reception held in the society halls. Light 
refreshments were served. 

Mrs. Harker gave the girls a pleasant surprise in a 
picnic supper served from the gymnasium. 

Sept. 21. The Y. W. C. A. gave its first party for the 
new girls, with the members of the cabinet in the receiving 
line. 

Sept. 22. After the Y. W. meeting the "old" girls 
called on the "new" girls in their rooms. 

Sept. 23. Dean Weaver's first Monday morning 
+alk. Miss Johnston entertained the Junior class at a 
delightful afternoon party to which the girls brought their 
embroidery. Fruit ice and macaroons were served. 

Sept. 24. With short talks by the editor and the 
business manager, the "Greetings" was introduced to the 
school at morning chapel. The newly furnished ofl&ce was 
opened for business, and the number of subscriptions 
received on the first day augured favorably for a success- 
ful year. 

As most of the enrolling was now completed and the 
classifications determined, regular chapel seats were 
posted. We are especially glad to welcome a freshman 
class of fifty. 

Page Thirteen 




^i)t College (flreetingss 




The Belles Lettres and Phi Nu societies held their first 
regular meetings in the society halls. 

Sept. 25. Announcement was made of the class offi- 
cers for the year. 

The Junior Endowment Fund was begun by a gen- 
erous gift from Miss Fay Burnett who is studying this 
year at the University of Chicago. 

Sept. 26. This morning a time-honored custom of 
I. W. C. was begun — the short walks after breakfast. 

Regular gymnasium work began, with a large per- 
centage of the students enrolled for indoor work. 

The Y. W. cabinet held its first regular meeting in the 
president's rooms. 

Sept. 27, After a brief morning chapel service, the 
various classes met with their class officers to perfect their 
organizations for the year. 

Sept. 28. The Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors engi- 
neered a college "Sing," a more detailed account of 
which is given later. 

Sept. 29. President Harker returned after an ab- 
sence of ten days from a business trip through Texas and 
other southern states. 

Sept. 30. The faculty enjoyed a quickly planned and 
as quickly executed tramp to the woods, ending at noon 
vrith a picnic dinner around a bon-fire. 

The freshmen enjoyed an unusual privilege in a tour 
through the School for the Deaf, as planned by their class 
officer. Miss Jennie Anderson. 

Oct. 1. The first number of the Greetings was issued 
promptly on the regular day of publication. 

President Harker gave an instructive chapel talk 
concerning the Apostles' Creed and some modern mis- 
takes in its repetition. 

The house girls were interested in the first change of 
tables in the dining room. 

Page Fourteen 



Wtit CoUege ^reettng£( 




Oct. 2. The Y. W. C. A. conducted a pie sale after 
chapel. 

Oct. 3. A long-awaited event took place when in an 
impressive service the new chapel organ was dedicated by 
President Harker. In the evening the opening recital was 
given by Mr. Harrison Wild. These events are more fully 
described in other connections. 

After the Organ Recital Mrs. Harker gave an informal 
reception to meet Mr. and Mrs. Wild. 

Oct. 4. The upper class marshmallow roast. 

Oct. 5. The college masquerade. 

Oct. 6. A notable chapel talk by President Harker, 
in which he emphasized the fact that the greatest thing 
in the world is our personality, our self. 

Recognition service in Y. W. C. A. 

Oct. 7. In a cross country hike today in which the 
4th year academy girls were the hares and the 3rd year 
the hounds, the hares outwitted their pursuers and re- 
turned an hour ahead of them. 

There were about seventy-five I. W. C. girls who at- 
tended the concert by Sousa's band. 

Miss Maude Raymond, traveling student secretary of 
the Y. W. C. A., arrived on an evening train. 

Oct. 8. In the evening Postmaster and Mrs. Reeve 
tendered a reception in the college parlors to the post- 
masters and their wives who were in town at the state 
convention. An excellent concert was given in music hall 
by the music faculty. 

Phi Nu open meeting, 

Oct. 9. The cabinet entertained the students in honor 
of Miss Raymond. 

Oct. 10. The first pupil 's recital in music hall, 

Oct, 11, The College Specials had a jolly good time 
at a picnic supper in spite of the fact that the weather 
caused them to go to Expression Hall rather than to 
Nichol's Park as had been planned. 

Page Fifteen 



tE^fje College (Jlreetingg 




An interesting chapel talk by Dr. Hanscher aroused 
the faculty and students to greater enthusiasm for work 
on our $180,000 endowment fund. 

Oct. 12. The Y. W. county fair. 

The Greetings Board met to discuss several important 
changes and new departures for the paper. 

Oct. 13. In a second chapel talk, Dr. Harker named 
as the first influence in the development of personality 
one's attitude toward evil. 

Oct. 14. The Pitner Picnic. 

The hard maple and the oak that stood together by 
the hedge in the big front yard looked at each other with 
a sigh of mingled relief and regret. 

"Well, they're gone and we won't see them again 
for a year," said the oak. ''I hope my leaves will be as 
pretty then as now. Didn't they have a good time, 
though" 

"Yes, indeed, if jolly faces and ringing laughter tell 
anything. And did you notice the number of pictures 
they took? I think some of the girls must have worn out 
their kodaks as well as, their ingenious ideas for poses. 
But did you notice how much they ate?" 

"Yes," answered The oak, "but it's no wonder, con- 
sidering how hungry they must have been after their long 
walk out here, and what a tempting dinner was waiting 
for them." 

The maple murmured somewhat inattentively, "My 
dear, had you noticed how late it's growing? It's high 
time we called in our little birds and put them to bed. 
Good-night." 

On Thursday, October 24, Founder's Day was ob- 
served at the Woman's College. Dr. Jos. Nate, who is 
Secretary of the Forward Education Movement, gave a 
talk on the importance of a foundation for all beginning. 
Page Sixteen 



Dr. Nate made his home in Jacksonville several years 
ago, and we were all glad to welcome him back, even 
though his stay was so short. The Founder's Day address 
was delivered by Bishop McDowell. It was the first time 
that many of the girls here had had the opportunity to 
hear him, so that his coming was anticipated with more 
than usual pleasure. It will be long before we forget his 
inspiring talk and his strong personality. 

Dedication of the organ presented to the Illinois 
Woman's College, Oct. 3, 1912, by Dr. C. E. Welch of 
Westfield, N. Y. 

On October 3, after the regular chapel exercises, Pres- 
ident Harker made the following address and prayer of 
dedication : 

It is written in the chronicles that when they brought 
the Ark of God, and set it in the midst of the tent that 
had been pitched for it, they offered burnt offerings and 
sacrifices, and sang psalms of praise to God in its dedica- 
tion. They then arranged for courses of men who should 
minister before the ark, some to offer burnt offerings, 
some to sing, and some, in the inspired language of the 
scriptures, to make a sound "with musical instruments of 
God." 

This peculiar expression, "'musical instrument of 
God" applies with special significance to the organ, the 
greatest and the grandest of all musical instruments, and 
the one particularly set apart for use in the service of God 
in all His temples of worship. 

The making of such an instrument as this is one of 
the greatest triumphs of mechanical art, and the skillful 
manipulation of it one of the most noble achievements of 
musicianship. 

This beautiful instrument has been placed in our 
College chapel by the gift of one of our most generous 

Page Seventeen 



^t)f Coflege (^reetingg 



friends, Dr. C. E. Welch, and it is fitting that we should 
thus publicly in our ehaf>el service dedicate it to all its 
varied and appropriate uses. 

We have hoped that it would be possible for Dr. 
Welch to be present with us this morning, and to unite 
with us in the formal dedication of his gift, A letter just 
received shows that this is not possible, but his letter 
breathes so beautiful a spirit of consecration and of love 
for the College that I will make it a part of this dedica- 
tory service. 

My dear Doctor Harker: — 

I have your telegram, but cannot possibly come. I 
would if I could, for I know you would enjoy seeing me 
enjoy the organ and the College. 

I know the place, the room, the setting and I think I 
see the organ, the organ that has been given me that I 
may give it to the Illinois Woman's College, 

Have I built there, on the foundation and into the 
fibre and fabric of that heroic institution, something that 
will be a worthy part 1 

Other men have labored and it enters into their 
labors, into the place and conditions made for it — the 
organ is honored by being called to serve in such a com- 
pany, and I pray it may prove itself of great value in 
your work. 

Mj' best Avishes to you and your very good helpers. 

(Signed) C. E. WELCH. 

We here dedicate this organ to the praise of Jehovah. 
It will lead and inspire us in our chapel service that we 
may all join in praising the Lord, 

We also dedicate it to the culture and refinement of 
all the deeper and finer emotions, to resolve the soul's 
discords into harmony, to lift up those that are cast down 
to comfort the sorrowing, to inspire those that are faiat 
of heart. 

Its joyous and arousing harmonies will lead us in 
the coming successes of the College history; in the minor 
Page Eighteen 




Wtt CoUege ^vtttin^a 




tones of the funeral hymn it will express our sympathy 
and sorrow in the hours of bereavement and loss. When 
God's Messengers here call on women for deeds of duty 
and heroic service and sacrifice, it will stir our hearts 
to dare and do, and make us eager and active for the con- 
flict. 

Prayer of Dedication. 
Almighty God, our Heavenly Father, we thank Thee 
for the manifold blessings with which Thou dost here 
crown our lives, for the founding of this College, for the 
sacrifices of all Thy servants in its continued history, for 
its devotion to Christian culture, to knowledge and faith 
and service. We thank Thee for all the friends Thou art 
raising up for it, and w^e pray for Thy special blessing 
upon them all. We thank Thee for this musical instru- 
ment of God, which we here dedicate to Thy praise and 
to the enriching and ennobling of our lives. We pray 
Thy special blessing on Thy servant, whose consecrated 
stewardship makes it a part of our college equipment. 
And now we offer it to Thee for the advancement of Thy 
work. Graciously accept this our offering, and help us 
with it to dedicate ourselves anew to Thee and Thy service, 
and let Thy blessing be upon us in this hour, and through 
all our lives, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. 



CLASS EVENTS. 

Time Get. 4, nine P. M. 

Place — College Campus. 

Girls — Seniors, Juniors and Sophomores. 

The appearance of the seniors, in sweaters, at such a 
late hour may have seemed to the unsuspecting only an- 
other of the coveted privileges of the bachelors to-be, but 
when the Juniors and even the Sophomores, similarly clad, 
were seen hastening into the great black night there was 

Page Nineteen 



Wi)t CoUege ^tntinQfi 




need of anxiety. All fears were dispelled, however, and 
envy instead entered every Freshman and "Special" heart 
when they saw the bright bon-fires and the long sticks 
adorned with marshmallows around the big blaze. The 
members of this first "pep" meeting danced and sang in 
a way highly tantalizing to those who were so unfortunate 
as not to have a window, overlooking the scene of action. 

COLLEGE SING. 

We're coming, we're coming, a gay little band. 
To tell you the big college sing is at hand. 
So loosen your voices and burst into song 
And you will soon feel that you really belong 
To I. W. C. 
Which is a grand place for girls. 

They send them off to college 

To fill their heads with knowledge 
And separate them from their own dear mothers, their 
mothers. 

They go crying on the train 

Because it gives them pain 
And the girls' best friends are their brothers. 

We're glad we are, we're glad we are 

We're glad we're at the Woman's College 

Where the girls sing songs, with a lively swing 

Saturday night till the air just rings. 

You ought to hear, you ought to hear, 

You ought to hear their voices swelling 

And you '11 want to stay in the grand old state 

I double L, I don't know how to spell it, but it's there. 

We say it's there — way down in Illinois. 

This was only one of the many original productions 
rendered at the "College Sing" in the Society halls Sep- 
tember 28. Everybody was there and it is needless to 
say that the three upper classes were very much in evi- 
dence. That they might not seem to monopolize the even- 
ing with their choice selections many of the familiar college 
Page Twenty 




Wi^t CoUese (§reettnssi 




songs were sandwiched in, so that the new girls might 
catch and enter into the spirit of the occasion. A more 
personal note applying to the faculty was struck in a 
song, the first verse of which was, 

Some say our Miss Weaver, she 'aint got no style, 
Got style all the while, got style all the while, 

Some say our Miss "Weaver, she 'aint got no style, 
Got style all the while, all the while. 

Others of the faculty that received similar "honor- 
able mention" were: 

Miss Neville — class (Seniors). 

Miss Johnston — tattin'. 

Miss Cowgill — work. 

Miss Anderson — smile. 

Miss Kidder — voice. 

Miss Evans — gym. 

Miss Jennie — cards. 

Miss Stevenson — been abroad. 

Miss Knopf — sugar. 

Miss Miner — troubles. 

Miss Tanner— "as ifs" (gets "likes"). 

Mrs. Hartmann — hat. 

Mrs. Colean — keys. 

Our pianist — * ' pep. " 

Us students — "sing." 

Saturday evening, October 5, the Sophomores enter- 
tained all the college classes in honor of the Freshmen at 
a masquerade given in the society halls. The costumes 
were very clever, calling for much admiration and many 
smiles. While most of the girls played individual parts, 
the Junior class represented the * ' Old Woman Who Lived 
in a Shoe," surrounded by her troop of quarreling, push- 
ing, teasing children. After the unmasking, a big pan of 
warm taffy was brought out to be pulled. Many im- 

Page Twenty-one 




^fje College (Greetings; 




promptu "stunts" were "pulled off," and the evening 
closed with a grand march. 

COLLEGE OF MUSIC NOTES. 

Since the last issue of the Greetings the College of 
Music has been enrolling new students and has been gain- 
ing steadily in the force and quality of its work. 

At the chapel service, on the morning of October 3, 
the new organ which is the gift of Dr. Welch, was dedi- 
cated by Dr. Harker. Dr. "Welch had planned to be here 
for this service but unavoidable circumstances prevented. 
A letter, however, from him took an important part in 
the dedication service. On the same evening occurred the 
long-looked-for organ recital by Harrison M. Wild. 

Mr. Wild is one of the best pipe organists of Chicago 
and is also very prominent in the musical circles of that 
city, being Director of the Apollo Club. His splendid 
program proved to the audience the beautiful qualities of 
our organ as well as his own superior musicianship. He 
gave the following program : 

(a) Chromatic Fantasia Thiele 

(b) Air in D Bach 

(c) Offertoire Op. 8 Batiste 

(a) Adagio, from Sixth Symphony Widor 

(b) Communion, Op. 4 Batiste 

(c) Fantasia and Fugue, G Minor Bach 

(a) Lied des Chrysanthemes Bonnet 

(b) March — Tannhauser Wagner 

(c) Funeral March and Seraphic Chant Guilmant 

(a) Spring Song Mendelssohn 

(b) Andantino Lemare 

(c) Fugue — "Hail Columbia" Buck 

After the reception to the postmasters on the evening 
of October 8, an informal recital was given by several of 
Page Twenty -two 



ZJrf)C CoUege (greetings! 






the members of the Faculty. An organ number was given 
by Professor Donald Swarthout and piano numbers by 
Miss Nicholson. Miss Parsons read very charmingly while 
Mrs. Taylor and Miss Beebe pleased the audience with 
their vocal numbers. Professor Max Swarthout completed 
the program with several highly appreciated violin selec- 
tions. 

The Glee Club has been organized and the work is 
now progressing nicely under the charge of Mrs. Taylor. 

The first informal Thursday afternoon students' re- 
cital was given October 10. The College of Music should 
be congratulated on the quality of this first program as 
the work is just getting under way. Judging from the 
talent shown on this first occasion, the future seems 
bright for the musical department. The recital was fairly 
well attended but even more of the music students should 
avail themselves of the particular advantages of these 
programs. 

The college is to be congratulated in securing as 
eminent an artist as Maude Powell for the opening num- 
ber of the Artist's Course. On the evening of October 
21, Madam Powell, assisted by Thomas "W. Musgrove, 
rendered a program such as only an artist of her ability 
could render. The program consisted of the following 
numbers : 

1. Coleridge-Taylor Concerto, G Minor 

(In three movements.) 
I. Allegro Maestoso. 
II. Andante semplice. 
III. Allegro multo. 

2. Bach (1685) (unaccompanied) . (a) Loure 

(b) Bourree 

Nardini (1722) (c) Larghetto 

(d) Allegretto con 
spirito 

Page Twenty-three 




Cfje CoHege <!^reetins£f 




3. Brahms (a) Hungarian Dance, 

A Major 

Chopin (b) Minute Waltz 

Moskowski (c) Serenata 

Grasse (d) Scherzo 

(Dedicated to Mme. Powell) 

4. Eobert Eden (a) Tone Poem 

Cyril Scott (b) Asphodel 

Chaminade (c) Valse Ballet 

(Piano solos) 

5. Hubay Scenes de la Czarda 

SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS. 

Friends of Miss Breckon will be interested to hear 
that she is teaching in the public schools of Kansas City, 
Missouri, under the supervision of Miss Hyle. 

In response to frequent requests from the women of 
Jacksonville an evening class in cookery has been organ- 
ized and will meet for the first time October 15. The class 
will be composed of young women who wish to become 
acquainted with the application of science to the house» 
hold. 

A new phase of extension work in Home Economics 
is to be instituted by the girls of the second year normal 
course through the two newspapers of Jacksonville. A 
department of Home Economics is to be maintained in the 
papers, concerned with subjects which will be of both 
interest and enlightenment to the progressive woman. 

ART DEPARTMENT NOTES. 

Irene Merrill, Helen Adams, Helen Mathis, Lucy 
Royse and Margaret Camm are recent additions to the 
art classes from Jacksonville. 
Page Twenty-four 



™™— ""tltlMlllliliHBIMiia 

tlDiie CoUege Greetings; 




Miss KJiopf visited the art department classes of the 
state university during her recent visit to Champaign. 

The lecture by Lorado Taft on American Sculpture 
and Sculptors promises to be of great interest to the 
students of drawing and design. 

SOCIETY NOTES 

The Belles Lettres Society held the first of a series 
of open meetings for the new students of the college, in 
their hall at 4 :15 Tuesday, October 15. The subject under 
discussion was ''Early Christian Art." Several excellent 
papers were read, showing careful study and a deep un- 
derstanding of the subject. The musical numbers were 
especially well chosen and given. Miss Harrison giving 
especial pleasure in her violin solo which was beautifully 
interpreted and executed. The Belles Lettres girls were 
very glad to open their hall to the new girls, so many of 
whom were present. 

Several new officers were installed this month. Owing 
to Miss Ebert's absence a chorister was necessary and the 
society considers itself fortunate in having Miss Fenton, 
who has acted as chorister during her absence, take her 
place. Miss Maude Stephenson was selected as one of the 
pages. 

The Phi Nu Society elected Ruth Mattox to fill the 
office of chorister which was vacant on account of Mildred 
Weaver's inability to return this year. 

During the absence of Lena Gummerson Abbie Peavoy 
performed the duties of chaplain. 

The new girls who are sisters of old Phi Nus were 
received into the Society on Tuesday, October 8. 

A series of open meetings, to be given alternately by 
the societies, has been planned. To these all the new girls 
are invited in order that they may obtain some idea of 
what a society is and its management. The first of these 

Page Twenty-five 



ffi i M)Mflu.v;itWjai5i«aaaHf»'«'»'«™"sa aBi 



Cije CoUegc ^reetingg 




open meetings was held in the Phi Nu Hall Tuesday after- 
noon, October 8. The principal topics discussed were the 
College Literary Society and a Woman's College Girl. 

Y. W. C. A. NOTES. 

By the close of September the furnishing of the new 
Y. W. rest room on third floor Harker Hall was completed 
and opened for callers. The new room is much more cen- 
trally located than the old and is open at all times for 
those who may wish to use it. 

The recognition service for the new members was 
unusually impressive and well planned. The girls about 
to enter the association were seated together in the central 
section of the chapel, with the former members in the side 
section, printed programs were used after some well-chos- 
en remarks by the president and short speeches of wel- 
come by the cabinet, who were seated on the platform, 
the girls took the membership pledge and received the 
association flower, the white carnation. Mrs. Hartman 
sang a beautiful selection, and the service closed with a 
special prayer from the Psalms. 

A very interesting song service was led by Charline 
McCanse on the evening of Sunday, October 13. She was 
assisted by Elizabeth Metcalf, Effie MeClaird, Angle La 
Teer, and Edna Larson. 

Miss Maude Raymond, our traveling secretary, was 
with us from Oct. 7, to 10. The cabinet and various com- 
mittees had councils with her and many plans were per- 
fected for the year. On the evening of the 9th, the cabinet 
entertained the entire student body at a progressive tea to 
meet Miss Raymond. Red candles served for lighting, 
and tea was served by red-kimonaed Japanese girls on 
the broad landing of the stairs just opposite the Y. W. 
room. 

Page Twenty-six 



Kf)t College (greetings; 






Two birds were killed with one stone on the night of 
October 12, i. e., nearly $60 was cleared and a general 
good time was enjoyed at the Y. W. county fair. While 
the minstrel show was the hit of the. evening, the other 
attractions were not to be scorned. From the long, waxed 
Shoot-the-Chutes down the back stairs and the Merry-go- 
round with its caliope, through the Baby Show and Hall 
of Mysteries, past the Wild Man from Borneo and the 
Only Red Bat in Existence, to the pretty Girl in the Moon, 
every show was crowded throughout the evening. Pro- 
fessional "spielers" called on every hand through their 
megaphones, and at convenient corners, "hot dog" and 
pink lemonade were sold. Not a little was added to the 
picturesqueness of the scene by the costumes of the vis- 
itors, representing people ordinarily seen at a County Fair. 



ALUMNAE NOTES. 
Pleasant Plains. 

The pretty village of Pleasant Plains is historic 
ground in its relation to the early religious and educa- 
tional interests of Central Illinois. 

In the little cemetery on the slope of the hillside, 
scarcely a stone's throw from the business street, and 
where the late afternoon sun sends long shafts of light 
among the trees and the white stones beneath them — 
there rest from their labors men who toiled and sowed and 
builded in the pioneer days of Illinois ; men who subdued 
the wilderness and planted churches and schools in the 
forward march of Christian civilization. 

There is the grave of Peter Cartwright, who was one 
of the founders of our Woman's College and was the 
president of the first board of trustees. Beside his is the 
grave of his saintly wife, whose life ended one Sabbath 
morning in the country church not far away, just as she 

Page Twenty-seven 




tlTfje College Greetings; 




had completed a happy faith filled testimony of his Chris- 
tian experience. 

The graves of Daniel and Diana Short, parents of Dr. 
William Fletcher Short, who was for eighteen years pres- 
ident of the Woman's College, are just a few steps far- 
ther up the hillside. 

As would be expected there were from the start 
patrons of the Woman's College all about Pleasant Plains, 
and those who came from there as students are now 
scattered widely from ocean to ocean. But there remain 
some elect ladies whose lives radiate the bright and happy 
grace of their edueat e d Christian womanhood and whose 
daughters and grand-daughters have been and are stu- 
dents in the college. 

Among the ladies recently met there are Mrs. Mar- 
garet Tomlin whose grand-daughter Vera Tomlin has so 
large a place in our student body today. Mrs. Tomlin 
has recovered in a fortunate way from a recent serious 
accident, but she has lost none of the buoyant spirit char- 
acteristic of her. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Correll who in her college days was 
called "Little Lizzie Sinclair," has a beautiful home 
where hospitality abounds. 

Mrs. Stephen Epler was Anne Crum in the days when 
she led her geometry class and held the record for years 
as the only one who, unassisted, had solved every prob- 
lem in the book. These ladies were pupils during Presi- 
dent Adam's administration and are loyal daughters of 
I. W. C, as is also Mrs. Elma Atherton Zone, who is a 
member of the class of 1877. 



Page Twenty-eight 



iiiHiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiinmiiimiiiiiniiiniiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiuiHiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiimmiinHiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiN^ 



Here and There: 

Miss W. (At the reception): "Why are you all staying 
so long? Why does'nt someone make the start to leave?" 
Miss K. "We are all waiting for you to do that." 
Miss W. "I hate to have to be the starter each time." 
Miss K. "Well, is'nt that better than being a quitter?" 



:OTRELI/ & LEONARD 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OF 

CAPS 

GOWNS and 
HOODS 

To the American Colleges and Univer- 
ities from the Atlantic to the Pacific; 
[^lass contracts a specialty. 




Our Prices Make Cleaning 

a Necessity 
Dry Cleaned and Pressed 

Ladies' List 

Skirts 50c 

Jackets 50c 

Waists 50c and up 

Longcoats i.oo 

Dresses . . . . ,1.00 and up 

Sanitary Cleaning Shop 

214 S. Sandy St, Both Phones 631 
We call for your goods 



GO TO 
FOR 

Fresh Homemade Candies 

Hot and Cold Sodas 

All kinds of Presh and 
Salted Nuts 
Bast State St. 

tmuuiHiunMiiiniiiuiniiuinmiiuimiMUiiniMHiHiHiiHUiiuiMMniuiHiniiiirm 



Ladies' Fine Furs 
E. JENKIN 

15 West Side Square 



giininiriniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiuiiiitiiirniiiiiliiiuiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiUiiiiHiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

I Classy Styles We will be pleased to show you our line 

"W.T. REAU6H 

I Fashionable Footwear 

I For All Occasions 

I 

I 33 South Side Square Jacksonville, 111. 



Heard in the Latin Class: — 

Miss L/.: "And joining- hands with the Nymphs, the 
Satires danced under the trees." 



Otto Speith 
IPboto portraiture 



Member Photographers Associaton of Illinois 



j The Watson Studio Southwest Corner Square 

niiuiHitiiiiiniiiiHiMiiiHiiiMiiKiiiMiiiiiiiiniiiiinniiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiii.inHiiniiMuiniiHiHunuuiiuiiiiuiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiuiMiiiuiiniiiniMiiHM 



iniiiiiiiiiMiiimiiiiiiininiiiiiMiiMiiiimiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiMiiiiiiiiiitiiiiniiiiniiniiiMiiiMMiiimiiHniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmmi^^^ 



Dr. AivBYN Lincoln Adams j 

Oculist and Aurist | 

to the State School for the Blind i 

323 West State Street f 



DR. KOPPERlv 

Dentist 

26 West State St. 



Practice limited to diseases of the 
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 



Miss A. (in Psycholog-y): Well, Miss C, I don't just 
understand about auditory aphasia. If you were to say 
something- to me now in class, and I did not understand 
what you meant, would it be auditory aphasia?" 



)r. R. R. BUCKTHORPE: 
Dentist 

111. Phone, House 1054 

OfiSce 750 
Bell Phone, Office 512 
Over Hatch Drug Store 

Jacksonville, 111. 



DR. BYRON S. GAILEY 

EYE 
EAR 
NOSE 
THROAT 

340 West State Street 



Th<? Collc^^ Girl I 

X 

The Summer winds were kind to you | 
And left your face an Indian hue | 

But when your school work you plan | 
Of course you want to lose your tan, | 
So use YARA Greaseless Cream | 

25 cents the jar. | 

Armstrong's Drug Store S. W. Cor- | 

net Square, | 



DR. CARL E:. black | 

Office— 349 E. State St. f 

Both Phones 85 | 

Residence 1305 West State St. | 

Both Phones 285 | 

Surgery — Passavant Memorial Hospital | 

and Our Saviours Hospital | 

Hospital Hours — 9:00 a. m. to 12 m. | 

Office Hours — 1:30 to 4 p. m. Even- | 
ings and Sundays by appointment | 



iiuiiiiiniiiininniniiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiMiiiiniiiiiiiiHiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiMiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiiniiiin 



^iiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiMiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiniiiimMuiiminiiiNiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiirimniiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiniHiiiiinm 

I It is our "business to get new goods for you 

I We are never fully satisfied with our stock, but keep con- 

I stantly adding to it in order that no customer's needs may be over- 

I looked. Besides we believe it our duty to be forever watchful of 

I the markets and so secure "EVERYTHING" and "THE BEST" 

I We do not depend on onlyone line to make a profit — hence 

I can sell cheaper. 

I A complete line of Drags and Groceries 

I Phone. 800 I^QBEIK^TS BI^OS. Phones 8ol 
I Open every working day and night. 

I 29 South Side Sq. 



Clerk (in dry g^oods store): "Say, do you address it 
Women's College or Woman's College?" 

Answer: "Woman's." 

Clerk: "Well, ain't they mostly kids down there, 
anyway?" 



I A Woman's Store 

I rilled with tl^e Luxuries and Necessities whict^ appeal 

I to ti^e heart of everv woman 

I Advanced Styles at 

I Moderate Prices 

I We take a pride in proclaiming- that we have the 

I lightest, brightest store in the State of Illinois, filled by 

I a rapidly changing stock of attractive merchandise, and 

I catering ever to the wants of young women. 

I Coats Suits Dresses Costumes 

I Waists Gloves Hosiery Jewelry 

I Laces Ribbons Corsets Neckwear 

I Linens Notions Art Goods Handkerchiefs 



I LADIES* AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. 

fninniiiiiiiniiiiiiiinniniiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinriuiiiiiiiiiiHiiiinMiiiiiiiiMiMnnniiiiiniHiNiMiMiiinnniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiniiiiiiniin 



iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniuiiiiMiiiiiniiiiiHiiHiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiininiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiniMiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiinMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiii^ 



GEO. T. DOUGLAS 
Fancy Groceries 



234 West State St. 



738 East North St. 



Miss X. (reciting" on Virg-il's life): "Then he studied 
Eng-lish for a time." 

MissW.: "Einglish! But they did not have Eng-lish 
then." 

Miss X.: "Well, anyhow, it said that he studied 
Composition and Rhetoric." 



Jacksonville's Largest Mens' Store 

Pennants and Banners 

I. W. C. and Fraternity special designs 

Mannish Cut Sweater Coats 

Hand Bag's, Trunks 

and Suits Cases 



GIRLS 

Our Baby Minnette Photo 
is just the thing 
you are looking for 
Call and see 

McDougall 

The West State Street 
Photogradhcr 

IIIMIIIItllllllMllllllllilllMlllllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMllllllliiMiiiini 



PACIFIC 

Jacksonville's Best and most 
Popular 

HOTEL 

The Home of the Traveling Man 
Jno. B. Suell, Prop. 
Rates ^2.25, $2.50, and $3.00 per day 
One Block West of Womans College 
Opposite Post Office 
Rooms with or without bath 
Local and Long Distance Telephone 

in every room. 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiniiiiiiiiR 



■MiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiniiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiniiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiniin 

E i 

= ' ! 

= s 

I SKIRT BOXES | 

I ROCKERS. SCREENS, DESKS | 

I AND EED ROOM CURTAINS j 

I AT I 

iJoliiison, Hackett & Guthriej 



Miss D. (at head of stairs on third floor): "Oh my! 
but these stairs are lots better than those on fourth. 
These go down, but the fourth floor stairs go up." 



I KODAK FINISHING 
fVulcan Roll Films 
I Cameras from $2.00 up 

lEverything" strictly first class 

j Claude B. Vail 

lOswald's Drug Store 71 E. Side Sq. 



|Frank Elliott, Pres. Wm. R. Routt, Vice-Pres. 

i C. A. Johnson, Vice-Pres. 

I J. Weir Elliott, Cashier 

i J. Allerton Palmer, Asst, Cashier 



lELIvIOTT STATE BANK 

I Jacksonville, 111. 



Capital 
Undivided Profits 

Frank Elliott 
J. Weir Elliott 
Wm. R. Routt 
Wm. S. EUoitt 



$150,000 
$ 15.000 



Frank R. Elliott 
John A. Bellatti 
C. A. Johnson 



Piepenbrings Variety Store | 

One block east of College I 



HERE TO PLEASE 



Candies 
Cookies 
Sandwiches 
Groceries 



Cakes | 

Pies j 

Pop on Ice I 

California Fruits i 



School Suppiies 



Girls I 

Don't forget our Advertisers | 



Tniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiniiiiiMniiiiniiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiMHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniMiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiniii' 



i!iiHiiMHHinniniiMnniiMMiii!innMnMiitniiiiiHiiiiii!!iniiiiiiHiiiiMiiiniiiiiiniuiNiniiiii:iiniiiin;:iiiHini::!:iiii::niii:n;;iiiiMii:ni!Miiii!iiiiniHiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiH'^ 

The bride s first choice for the home? | 

House Furnishings of Quality j 

from the I 

ANDRE & ANDRE I 

Our Special Rooin Furnishings will interest every student | 



After his sermon to a colored congfregation. one en- 
thusiast exclaimed to the Bishop, "Why, you tol' things 
I nevah heard befo'." 

"Indeed, and what was that?" asked the Bishop. 

"Bout Sodom and Gomorrah. Why, Bishop, I always 
thoug'ht they was a man and his wife." 



HOFFMAN'S 

Lunch Room 

opposite Depots 

609-611 Kast State Street 

Jacksonville, 111. 



Len G. Magill 
Printer 

East State Street 111. Phone 41^ 



Montgomery & Deppe 

E)VERYTHING IN DrY GoODS 

Well Lighted First Floor Cloak and Suit Room 

Agents for the Ladies Home Journal Patterns 
The new "Howd" front laced corsets 



'uuHiiiuuiiiiiiiimiiiMiiiiiiiiiuiiimimniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir 



i'""""""""""""'" '""""" ""iminiminmriiimnii nmimni minrHi.nmHiMii.i.immiiii„mmm„„mm«,„timi.i 



iiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiitiMi 




FALL Foot^rear 

OUR SPECIALTY 

Dress Slippers 
Street Shoes 
5?droom Slippers 

We Repair Shoes 



Little Jane was visiting- her aunt, whose new home 
was supplied with all modern conveniences. At break- 
fast the aunt, desiring- more biscuits, pressed an electric 
button with her foot. The maid appeared instantly and 
took off the plate. 

"Say, Mary," broke in the little g-irl as Mary left the 
room, "was you peeping-?" » 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Fancy Bazaar 
and Millinery 

211 West State Street 



Illinois Phone 419 Bell Phone 417 

A. L. Bromley 

Ladies' Tailor 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and 
Repairing. Ladies' Man Tail- 
ored Suits to order. Remodeling 
of all kinds. Special rates to 
I. W. C. students. All work 
called for and delivered promptly 



TAYLOR'S 



I Grocery 

j A g-ood place to trade 
I 221 West State Street 

7IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII Illlllllllllllllllltlllllltllllllllllllll IIIIIUIIIIIIUIIIIIUIIIIIIIlAlllllllUUIIIIIIIIIIII 



GAY'S 

reliable: 

HARDWARE 



IIIIIHIIIIIIimiHIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIHIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIimillllllllHIl^ 



niniiiiiiiMiiiniiiniiimiiimiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiimimiliiniiiiuiniiimiiiuiiiiiiiuimiiiiiiiiinmmiiiiiiiiiiuiiniiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiisiuiiiiiiiiiiM 

College Jewel rv I 

Engraved Cards and Invitations | 

Clearing Disf^es, Copper and Brass Goods | 

Speuai Die Stationery I 

21 South Side Square. | 



"Bobbie," said his mother, "why in the world didn't 
you g-ive this letter to the postman?" 

"Because," answered Bobbie with dig"nity, "I did not 
see him until he was entirely out of sig-ht." 




JACKSONVIH.K, /LL» 

Established 1890 

/ow Prices Square Dealing- 
Keep us busy 



11. Phone 57 



Bell Phone 92 



Fresh Drugs, 
Fancy Goods 
Stationery 



H 



Jadoer Drug him 

2 doors West of Postoffice 



Florence Kirk King 
Hair Dresser 

Now prepared to manufact- 
ure French hair and combings 
into the 1912-1913 styles. 

Shampooing and scalp mas- 
sage by appointment at your 
residence. 

Illinois Phone 837 
Residence 503 West College Street 



If only 5'ou'll 



Remember Cherry's I 

We'll be pleased, and we | 

know positively that you'll | 

find no cause for complaint. | 

Our horses are safe; our equi- | 

pages have character and in- | 

dividuality, and our prices are | 

most reasonable. | 

Cherry's Livery | 

Both Phones Jacksonville, 111. i 
iiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 



:'MiiHiMiiMiiMitiiiiinmiiiimiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiMiiiiMiiiiiiiiMiinriiinmMmiimiimiimiiiiiiimiMimiiiiiiiiinniuininiNiinii:!M!iHMni!i:!:ii 



Cafe 



Confectiocar 



(Peacock Inn 



Catering" 



Soda 



Candie 



Pat was being" questioned, preparatory to receiving 
his naturalization papers. Among" the questions pul 
was "Have you read the Constitution?" "Yes, youi 
Honor," g"libly replied the Irishman, "and I'm glad t( 
say I were very much pleased with it." 



Oswald's 

Drug Store 

71 East Side Sq. 

TOIIvKT ARTICLES 

PERFUMES 
FINE STATIONERY 



I Ladies' High Grade, Late Style Pictorial Review Patten 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Work 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 East State St. Jacksonville, '. 

Illinois Phone 388 



FUR SCARFS and MUFFS 



are; soIvD by 



Frank Byrns 



Most Reasonable Prices 



For Sale at 



cz 




DRY GOODS STORL 



^imininiiiiiiininininiininiiiiuiiiuiuiMiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiimiminiiuiniiiuiimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiminiiuiiiiimtimiiiiiiiiniiiiiuiiiiiiiimininm 



IMIIIIIIIIIinilllllllllHIIIIIIIII"IIMIII"IIIIIHI"<)""">**<""''*'"'""""'*'''<'<''''"<'''<''''<'''''''"'''H'''"'*'''"''""""'"'"**'''"''''"""""^ 

It will pay you to visit 

SCHRAM'S 

Jewelry Store 



The host was nervous and inexperienced and he rose 
hurriedly at the conclusion of the song-. 

"Ladies and-er-g-entlemen," he began, "before Mr. M. 
started to sing-, he asked me toapolog-ize for his-er-voice, 
but I omitted to do so-er-so I-er-apolog-ize now." 



Qcy Articles Christmas Goods 

COOVER & SHREVE'S 
Drug Store 



kodaks and Supplies 

Developing and Finishing 



Dorwari Market 

\.l.h KINDS OF FRESH and 

SALT MEATS, FISH, 

POUI.TRY, ETC. 

Both Phones 196 230 W. State St. 



COOK 

LIGHT with GAS 
HEAT 

Jacksonville Railway & 
Light Company 

224 South Main Street 



Ask your g-rocer for | 

HOLSUM I 

BREAD I 

Made Clean. Delivered clean | 
in waxed paper wrappers | 



^iiiniiininiiiiininiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiinminiiiiiimiiiininiiiiniiiiiimininmiMniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiMiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiimmimiiiiim 

I For those who discriminate 

I We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to 

I please the students who come to our city. We select only the 

I best materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. 

I Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and 

I Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. 

I Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all 

I College functions. 

I Vickery & Merrigan 

I C5A.TeF5EF=?S 

I 227 West State Street 



During- his first curacy, a clerg-yman found the num- 
ber of ladies eager to help him so great that he g^ave up 
the place. Not long- after he met his successor. 

"How are you g-etting- on with the ladies?" he asked. 

"Very well. There's safety in numbers," was the 
answer. 

"I found it in Exodus," was the quick reply. 



I Hillerby's 

I Dry Goods Store 

I Safest Place 

I to Trade 

E 

I The Jacksonville National Bank 

i invites your business 

I Capital . . . |2oo,ooo 

I Surplus . . 32,000 

I Deposits . . . 1,100,000 

I U. S. Depository for Postal Saving Bank 

I Julius E. Strawn, President 

I Miller Weir, Cashier 

I Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear 

I H. J. Rogers, A. A. Curry 

I C. B. Graff 



Brady Brothers 

Hardware, Cutlery 
Paints 



C. S. MARTIN 

Fine Pictures — Artistic Framing 

Frames and Ovals of all 

descriptions and sizes 

Imported and Domestic 
Wall Paper 

314 W. State St., Scott Block 

Jacksonville, 111. 



^iiiiininiiiwiiiiiHiininiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiMiiiiniiiiuiiiiHiiMiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiii!iin!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiii!!iiiiiii!!iiMiiiiii ii iiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiitMniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiMiniiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiniiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiMiiiii^ 

The most dainty thing's in Rings and Jewelry. I 

New and handsome styles of gfoods in Sterling- Silver i 

Highest grades of Cut Glass, and every i 

description of Spectacles and Bye Glasses I 

Fine Diamonds a Specialty I 

at i 

RUSS E)LL«&LYON'S | 

West Side Square I 

Both Phones 96 I 



Miss I.: "It was great! It made you feel like a pea- 
nut, with only the shell left." 



lathis, Kamm & Shibe say 

We can furnish your 

Shoes and Party Slippers 

in the popular styles, 

leathers, and 

fabrics 



F. E. Farrell E. E. Crabtree | 

Established 1864 | 

F. G. FARRELL & CO. | 

I 

BANKERS I 

a 

Successors to First National Bank | 
Jacksonville, 111. | 




ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAIv OCCASIONS 



iiiHiiiiiminiiiiiuiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiiiitiniHiiiiiniiiiMiiniiimniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiMiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiniitiiiiiiMniiin 



^iiiniiiMiMniiniiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiniiiiiiiiiiiMiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiininiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiuinin^ 



I J. A. OBERMEYER 



HARRY P. OBERMEYER [ 



CITY DRUG AND BOOK STORE 

Stationery, Pennants, Novelties, Drug's and 
TOILI)T REQUISITES 

Quality Counts — We Count 
Phones: Illinois 572, Bell 457 Corner South Main St: and Square 



A Bishop in China once remarked to one of his friends 
over there, "When I first came here I could not tell any 
two of you apart. You all looked as much alike as two 
peas." 

"Say rather," was the answer, "as much alike as 
two queues." 



Desig"ns, Cut Flowers, 
Plants 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

Greenhouses, Bell 775 



THE SATISFACTION 
we enjoy through selling you 

OUR FINE SHOES 

is equaled only by 

YOUR SATISFACTION 

in wearing them 

Evening Slippers 

Jas. McGinnis & Co 

62 East Side Square 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING 

for the latest in Suits, Ladies' Underwear, Ribbons 

Laces, Embroidery Materials or Notions 

Visit the store that carries the 

up-to-date merchandise 



f=he:l.f=>s c& osbofrn 




Mnsic Hall Main Building Extension Harker Hall 

Erected 1906 Erected 1850 Erected 1902 Erected 1909 



LLINOIS 



OMAN'S COLLEGE 



College of Liberal Arts 

(Full classical and scientific courses) 

College oi' Music 
School of Fine Arts 
School of Expression 
School of Home Economics 



Standard College — one of the best. 
Regular college and academy courses 
leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- 
inently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located 
in the Middle West, in a beautiful, 
dignified, old college town, noted for 
its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends 
who are looking tor a good college. 
Call or address, Registrar 

Illinois Woman's College, 

Jacksonville, 111. 




HiHiiiiiMwmmHiiHiimiiiMiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiimitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiniMniiiMiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiitinMitnHiiiiMiMtMMiiini 



^iiiiiiuHMiiiiiiriiiiiiiimiiniHiiiiiiiiiiiiiirtiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiHiiniiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiintiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinMiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiimtninii^ 

I SHE^ET MUSIC, MUSIC MERCHANDISE 

I TALKING MACHINES. RECORDS 

I AND SUPPLIES 

I 19 SOUTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTIZERS 



Ayers National Bank 



Capital 
^200,000 

Surplus 
$50,000 

Deposits 
$1,000,000 

FOUNDED 1852 




The combined capi- 
tal and surplus of this 
bank is 

One Quarter 
Million 
Dollars 

the largest of any bank 
in Morgan County. 

UNITED STATES 
DEPOSITORY 



I OFFICERS 

I M. F. Dunlap, President O. F. Buffe. Cashier 

i Andrew Russel, Vice President R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashier 

I R. M. Hockenhuli, Vice President H. C. Clement, Asst Cashier 

I C. G. Rutledge, Vice President 

I DIRECTORS 

I Owen P. Thompson George Deitrick Harrv M. Capps 

I Edward F. Goltra > R. M. Hockenhuli O. F. Buffe 

I John W. Leach M. F. Dunlap Andrew Russel 

3 

^wniiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiniiHiiinnnniuniiMnniMiihniniitiiiiiMimiiiiMiMMiiMiinminiiMiiiiimiiMiiiim 



Cf}e Collese (§xtttm0 

^ The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 

^ Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month. 

4ff Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies 15c. 
€[[ Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 



Contents 

Effectual Fervent Prayer 3 

With Red Sprite 5 

Her Brother's Fault 7 

Why the Theme Didn't Come 8 

As We Build Th^m 10 

Her World 14 

Metrical Translations from Terence 15 

Editorial 17 

Junior-Senior Party 18 

The Indiana Stunt 17 

Hallowe'en Party 20 

Lorado Taft 21 

College of Music , .... 22 

Society Notes 24 

Y. W. C. A 24 

Locals 26 

Alumnae Notes 27 

Exchanges 28 



















jf rom fiolb to grap 
©urmilb.Stoeetirap 

0t inbian mm- 
metfabegtoos^oon; 

^ut tenberlp 

^tjobe tije gea 

?|angs, tof)ite 
anb talm, tfje 
iittnter'g moon. 

— Whittier 





















^bcCoUcQC (Greetings 

Vol. XVI Jacksonville, 111 , December, 191a No. 3 



"EFFECTUAL FERVENT PRAYER'* 

In a recent number of Scribner's Magazine, there ap- 
peared a noteworthy story by Henry Van Dyke, entitled "Et- 
fectual Fervent Prayer." The title is significant, because up- 
on the minister's wrong conception of wliat effectual fervent 
prayer is the story hinges. 

In a small Pennsylvania town a Presbyterian minister 
has tried to fill the douljle place of father and mother to his 
three children. One night he is compelled to tell them about 
his only brother whose life has been wild and unrestrained. 
He must tell them because his brother is coming for a visit — 
coming, as the minister feels, to tempt his innocent children 
with empty worldly vanities of which they have never known; 
to tempt them with Godless thoughts of self-indulgence. He 
warns them what to expect and pleads with them to remem- 
ber his teachings when his brother tempts them. When the 
children have left him for the night, this man of creed Ijound 
faith prays that his children may be saved from the tempter 
he knows his worldly brother will be; prays that this de- 
stroyer of his household's peace may be prevented in some 
way from coming into his home. 

In the cold gray darkness of the early morning he is 
awakened to receive the message that during the night some 
stranger has been drowned in attempting to cross the river 
in a sleigh. The minister, confusion in his heart, hastens to 
the river to confirm with his eyes what his mind has instantly 
pictured. His brother, lying dead before him, his prayer ef- 
fectually answered, stuns him into a silence that can not re- 
lieve itself in tears or explanation. 

Page Three 




tlDfie CoEege (^reetingsf 



As days pass the children creep about the house with 
awed faces. Everything is changed — no happy banterings, 
no quiet evening talks, interchanging the day's experiences. 
Always there is the stern set face of their father. What can 
it mean? Surely not grief for the brother who was brother 
only in name? They cannot answer each other's questions as 
to why he locks himself in study night after night and paces 
the floor; they cannot understand why each sleepless night 
leaves its ever deepening mark on his grave face. 

At last, the sixteen year old daughter of the house can 
no longer leave her father to his melancholy musings. "With 
fear, but with courage greater than her fear, she knocks at 
the study door. To her father's low "come" she enters to find 
him seated at his desk, his head in hands, his back bent, as if 
weighed down with the crimes of a life-time of wrong doing. 
In answer to her question his only reply is, "My prayer has 
killed my brother. I am his murderer. I prayed that he 
might be prevented from coming into my home and God 
answered that prayer." 

Here Van Dyke puts into the girl's words a world of sym- 
pathy and love as he follows thus her questioning: 

"Father, did you teach us that God is our Father, our 
real Father?" 

There was no answer. 

"Father, if I asked you to kill my sister Ruth, would you 
do it?" 

The man stirred, but he did not answer. 

"Father," the girl continued, "is it fair to God to believe 
that he would do something that you would be ashamed of? 
Isn't He better than you are?" 

The man started. "His word is sure. There is the prom- 
ise — the effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man availeth 
much." 

"But, father, if what you asked in your prayer was 
wrong, were you a righteous man? Could your prayer have 
any power?" 
Page Four 



tS^fje College ^reettngs( 




There was silence, then her father's breast was shaken, 
his head fell upon her shoulder. 

"Thank God!" he cried, "I was a sinner — it was not a 
prayer — God be merciful to me, a sinner." 

And their tears were falling fast, healing, helping tears. 

Such, in meagerest outline, is the story. Its strength lies 
in the excellent balance of theme and execution. To portray 
emotional stress effectively, and at the same time artistically, 
is no slight task. So skillfully, however, has Van Dyke done 
this in the character of the minister that the reader marvels 
at his delicacy in somewhat the same measure as he marvels 
at Hawthorne's delicacy when he describes the indescribable 
in the "Scarlet Letter." There is simplicity and directness 
toned by sympathy that gives to this short story the entirety 
and finality of some life long struggle. The conflict of the 
doctrine steeped minister, his inability to trust when he most 
needs to trust is offset by the simple, unquestioning faith of 
the child, who, though she can not argue, can speak convinc- 
ingly the truth she has learned. Simple she must be, strong 
in her belief she must be to bring relief to this strict student 
of God and his precepts. It is the world old question of creed 
bound theology against intelligent faith; a theology that 
would wrongly attribute to God the things that are born of 
man made fear against a faith that would rightly attribute to 
God only those things which are good. Out of the realm of 
self pity into the wholesome atmosphere of trustful love can 
the child lead the father, because, even unconsciously she had 
learned the lesson that the father's life-time of doctrinal 
training had not been able to teach him. 

Janette Powell. 

WITH RED SPRITE 

Little Robert, worn out by the day's play, sat before the 
fire drowsily watching the fitful blazing and snapping of the 
coals. Knowing this was an hour doomed to bed-time corn- 
Page Fiye 




Cfje College Greetings! 




mands, he had just said to himself: "0, I wish there weren't 
any beds; I hate to go to bed," when suddenly his eyes opened 
wide, for one of the flames had taken form and a little red 
man no bigger than a small sized doll hopped out of the fire 
and with a mighty leap landed on Eobert's lap. 

"0 ho! so you don't like to go to bed. Thgn come with 
me," said a thin, high, little voice. "I am Eed Sprite, the fire 
fairy. I'll take you for a little trip. Hop into my pocket." 

"How can I?" asked Robert, "I'm about fifty times as 
big as you are." 

With a smile Eed Sprite waved his hand. Eobert looked 
around him with surprise. How vast a space was the room. 
The fire-place seemed a mighty furnace; and as he looked 
over the edge of the chair it seemed miles to the floor. He 
was thoroughly frightened, but Eed Sprite, now larger than 
Eobert, reassured him, and put him into the pocket now am- 
ple and roomy for the little boy. 

I^'p the chimney they flew. Up and on through the lim- 
itless sky. At last after their long journey, Eobert, breath- 
less and excited, tumbled out of the pocket. He looked around 
him with interest. Before him stretched out flat prairie land 
covered with wild flowers and waving grasses. A little house 
stood near him with queer little porches on every side, on 
which were seen rov/s of tiny white cots. Eed Sprite now 
took his guest on a little exploration tour through Spriteland. 
Through meadows and fields they tramped; across tiny brooks 
they skipped. They seemed to travel in a circle, however, al- 
ways returning to the queer little house. The cots looked 
soft and warm and Little Boy was so tired that he lay down 
in one of them, but Red Sprite pulled him out at once, saying 
sharply, "You don't like beds. Why do you lie down?" and 
taking his guest by the arm Eed Sprite hurried him along, 
walking faster and farther than the time before. 

Finally Little Boy became so desperate that as they came 
in sight of the queer little house, he said to himself, "I'm go- 
ing to run ahead and get on one of those cots." With a quick 
Page Six 



QTijc CoUege (Jlrcctings; 




jerk he freed his arm from the grasp of the unsuspecting Eed 
Sprite and began to run, with Eed Sprite close at his heels. 
Faster and faster they ran. Eobert's breath came in short 
gasps. Eed Sprite was gaining. As they came to the porch 
Eobert with a flying leap tried to land on a cot just as Eed 
Sprite caught up with him, but he missed the cot and fell to 
the floor with a thud. 

As he opened his eyes and rubbed them, he stared about 
him to find that he was at home in front of the fire with 
mother bending over him saying, "Tired, little boy? Eeady 
for bed?" Marie Miller, '16. 

HER BROTHER'S FAULT 

With a smudge on her chin, with her hair streaming 
down her face, the girl clad in a large blue checked sleeve 
apron, sat perched on the top of the ladder — a ladder which 
was shaky enough to be interesting, yet inspired confidence 
with time. One foot dangled below her, giving the appear- 
ance of ease and comfort. Sir Galahad in her hand she was 
regarding with a frankly troubled look. Not that she wasn't 
pleased with him, for she was. The print was good, the frame 
of her own choice; but where should she hang him? Over 
the grate was a good place, but she knew he would feel out 
of place with Corot's Nymphs dacing so gaily about him. In 
the little den just off the library would she hang him; only 
there it was too dark. Finally she decided that Sir Galahad 
should hang over on the east wall near the corner she always 
sought when she wanted to think. She climbed the ladder, 
pushed back her hair, placed the ladder against the wall and 
once more ascended. She was placing the hook on the mould- 
ing, whistling one of the popular airs, when the door 
slammed. "Dick, no doubt." Then there were two voices 
and they were coming in the direction of the library. She 
knew it was traditionally true that one was always caught in 
an embarrassing position, but she never imagined her strait 
would be like this. Her eyes sought every means of escape. 

Page Seven 



Win College ^vtttinqi 



She was glancing at the west door just as the two came in. 
They were greeted with confused laughter and apologies. 
The girl was playing the game. Her brother was frankly 
amused. The man was a little confused himself. When they 
left a girl sat crying on the top of the ladder. On the floor 
lay Sir Galahad, face down in a shattered frame. 

Irene Cnim, '15. 

WHY THE THEME DID'NT COME 

The night before theme day, one hour until Glee Club 
rehearsal, and no inspiration — I was sure I could imagine no 
worse situation. It would have been different had the next 
day been easy, but five classes would occupy my time entirely. 
Trusting that the goddess of necessity would favor me once, 
I began sharpening a pencil thoughtfully. Just as I was con- 
structing in my mind an attractive opening sentence, a sud- 
den rap sounded on the door. 

"Hello, dearie! No, I can't sit down, thank you. I have 
only a minute to stay. I wanted to find out how much you 
paid for that perfectly darling mesh bag of yours. You got it 
here, didn't you? At Smith's?" 

'T^o, I didn't, Clara. It was sent to me." My tone of 
voice indicated pressing work. 

"It was? Well, now, isn't that funny? Some one told 
me you bought it down town Monday for four dollars. If 
you did, I wanted one like it. You don't know what shop it 
did come from, do you?" 

"No, I don't, Clara," in an attempt to express finality. 

"Well, I wish the next time you write to him — of course, 
it was from 'him,' you lucky thing — ^you'd ask him about it, 
because I want one badly. Thank you, dearie." 

She slammed the door and passed on to the next bureau 
of information. I felt rather guilty for having been so un- 
communicative. It would have completely spoiled her story, 
however, to say that father sent me the bag as a birthday 
present. 
Page Eight 



tE^fje CoHege ^reetingsf 




The sentence with which I was trying to begin my theme 
was with difficulty finding its way to the tablet, when 

"Come!" 

My next door neighbor entered with a sigh. I laid down 
my pencil, for 1 knew what her appearance meant. The last 
time I had had to get down my rubbers from the top closet 
shelf for her to wear on a "Gym" walk. 

"I came to ask for your fountain pen. I have to get a 
notebook ready to hand in in the morning. Lucile took her 
pen to the library, inconsiderate thing that she is. You don't 
mind my using it, I hope?" 

"0, no, not in the least,'' I answeied, struggling with 
myself to keep back the "Whaf s the use?" that wanted to be 
said. 

She left with my clierished fountain pen, point down- 
ward, in her hand. As she went down the hall, I heard some- 
thing fall to the floor and my worst fears were aroused. 

To my theme I returned. Was that the sentence that 
I had thought was so inviting? Either I had badly mistaken 
its merits, or else its attractiveness had not lasted long. Per- 
haps, if I substituted an example for that general statement 
— the sound of footsteps, coming nearer and nearer, more and 
more slowly, interrupted my thinking. This time my voice 
was impatient and grew even more irritable when I saw that 
dark blue waist, with its three sets of hooks and eyes to be 
fastened. 

"What in the world are you dressing for at this time oi 
the night?" I asked, as Marie backed up to me suggestively. 

"0, our table is going to have a little party down town 
tonight. Do you have to study, you poor child?" 

"Yes, I'm trying to write a theme, and a desperate time 
I am having. Here's a hook off. Hand me a pin from the 
dresser." 

"I wrote mine Just before dinner. I never spend much 
time on them. The kind written on the spur of the moment 
are usually best, too, don't you think? Are you all through? 

Page Nine 



Wi)t College ^xtttings 





Thanks! I'll bring you a stick of candy, if I don't forget." 

The door was no sooner closed than I hung out mj "En- 
gaged" sign, upside down, to warn even my dearest friends 
that interruption would not be tolerated. 

Sara had written her theme just before dinner. Doubt- 
less it would be a clever little sketch that would win the in- 
terest of everyone in the class, to say nothing of the coni 
mendation of the teacher. Everyone, unfortunately, was not 
so gifted. I reread my first sentence. By this time, it was 
weak and colorless, advertising the fact that what was to fol- 
low would probably be worse. 

A note was slipped under the door. I read: "Miss Aus- 
tin wants to see you in the reception room." Miss Austin-- 
Austin — why, she must be — yes, she was one of those numer- 
ous cousins of grandmother's whom father was anxious that 
I should see. Of all inopporutne times to call, this was surely' 
the least convenient. She must have been in this neighbor- 
hood for dinner and thought- she would save time by looking 
me up now. I snatched a clean handkerchief from the draw- 
er, stuck my back comb in more securely, and went down- 
stairs, dropping my theme in the waste basket on my way. 

Celia Cathcart, '15. 

AS WE BUILD THEM 

A girl, after leisurely tying her little skiff to the 
bough of a tree, tM^isted conveniently near the water's 
edge, reclined on the grassy bank in luxurious idleness. 
The water lapped against the bank, the rays of the after- 
noon sun flashed countless diamonds over the surface, but 
its loveliness was wasted upon the girl surveying it with 
unseeing eyes, for she was an architect, intent only on 
the construction of her palaces. No blue prints had she, 
for there were no things so cumbersome as plans needed 
have any Adsible material for all she needed existed in 
great abundance in the realms of her thought. So she 
Page Ten 




l^de CoUese Greetings; 




built her castle of intricate passageways and attractive 
and graceful spires and peopled it with thoughts irre- 
inquired how she built, she probably could not have told. 
She would have suggested that he learn the pleasure for 
himself for it requires no training. Anyone can be a 
dreamer of dreams. She went on fashioning this castle 
without noise and without jar, until a wilful wind whisked 
by and gathering her castle to itself, mingled with the 
fleecy whiteness of the overhanging clouds. 

MARY NANON LINNEY, 15. 

The delight of dwelling in the dreamy realms of air 
castles may fall, at some time, to every one's good fortune. 
For, too perishable to be of much consequence, are the 
flimsy scaffoldings fancifully begun in the class room on a 
drowsy, spring morning or dreamed between study bells 
for, suddenly disturbed in the process of erection they 
fall to ruin. 

Just at twilight on a cool, November evening a large, 
comfortable chair should be placed invitingly before a 
rosy bed of coals smouldering in the fireplace. In the 
soft, peaceful glow that silhouettes the surroundings and 
encourages only a dim suggestion or a shadow of a 
thought, the conditions are perfect for a blissful, half- 
asleep, half-awake existence of pleasant memories of the 
past and happy anticipations of the future. Then, with- 
out the slightest effort, the hazy mist of a fancy takes 
form and rises into a delightful fairy air castle. 

MARY LAWSON, '15. 

She sat in the kitchen door and looked dreamily out 
on the sun drenched yard, where the hens clucked lazily 
to their broods or rolled in the yellow dust. Now and 
then she gave two or three quick, decisive jabs with the 
churn handle that she held; but before the white bubbles 
on the lid had disappeared, she was back again in the 

Page Eleven 




JE^f^t CoUege ^reettnsK 




land of dreams. She saw nothing that was before her 
but over there in the hazy distance a mighty structure 
rose higher and higher. It, was built on the foundtion 
of dead hopes; the walls were of things that user to be; 
and it was covered with a roof of what might have been. 
As spirits of the past flitted back and forth before the 
windows, she began to feel that there was where she be- 
longed with those things of the by-gone. She knew that 
there she would find ambition with its broken wing. 
There, too, was love, not as she had imagined it once but 
dwarfed and shrivelled by poverty and hard work. She 
knew she would find — But a rough voice roused her 
from her musings. With a great effort she came back to 
the sordid present and the monotonous splash of the milk 
in the churn gave no hint of the contesting emotion in 
her breast. MONA SUMMERS, 15. 

The lazy weeping willows dipped their tired, droop- 
ing branches in and out of the cool waters. A soothing, 
rustling noise made by the breeze as it went through the 
thick shrubbery, together with the scurrying of some little 
animal through the tall grass and the twitter of a little 
bird, made me think this might be the place where fairies 
dwelt. I glanced at my pole and then at my cork; a 
dragon fly, with its silky wings gracefully poised, hovered 
near it. Then seeing all was well I began to go from the 
Present into the "Land of the Future." Into that land 
of wonderful dreams I went farther and farther until at 
last the willows on the opposite bank had disappeared 
and wonderful castles were there. Still farther I went 
until — then my pole jerked. Asweega, my Indian guide, 
bade me pull quickly. At the same time from across the 
waters came the call for day dreamers to hurry into camp 
before darkness fell. 

IRENE CRUM, 15. 

Page Twelve 



^ 



HTfje CoUege ^xtttinQSi 




As the last sweet tones of the soprano's solo linger 
quiveringly, then die away in the solemn stillness of the 
high vaulted church, you lean back with a contented feel- 
ing of restful quiet in your soul. The text is read but 
somehow you fail to grasp it. It sounded uninteresting; 
in truth you are loath to concentrate your mind on any- 
thing in particular. The big auditorium is dim and cool, 
the noise and heat of the hot day are shut out. You 
are enclosed in a dusky, reverently hushed atmosphere. 
Only a shaft of sunlight sifts through the stained glass 
windows, lighting up the silvery hair of the old minister 
whose stateliness reminds you of the hory kings of fairy 
tales. Giving free rein to your fancy your thoughts flit 
like a darting butterfly from one idea to another. You 
wonder about the people who listen so attentively. The 
droning voice of the speaker only soothes your already 
calm spirit. What he is saying is immaterial to you ex- 
cept as you catch a word or a phrase, which starts your 
truant thoughts on a new train. Many foundations are 
started ; halls and towers of hopes and expectations for 
future years spring up with gratifying rapidity. By no 
means are they alike, for swift as a humming bird does 
your fancy change your ambitions. The refrain of the 
solo, still echoing in your mind, a striking thought from 
the half heard sermon or the familiar face of a friend — 
all serve as material for weaving dreams. As your gaze 
wanders over the audience the streak of sunshine catches 
your eye again. You watch it streaming steadily through 
the many colored panes and away fly your thoughts to 
distant scenes and people. Still different air castles float 
before your dream clouded vision. Even dreams must 
end; the last words of the sermon followed by the open- 
ing bars of the last hymn break the spell. The cobwebs 
are swept away from your brain by the relentless broom of 
reality and you return to earth and the benediction. 

FREDA SIDELL, '15. 

Page Thirteen 




^fft CoHege Greetings; 




HER WORLD 

Slowly Kate picked up the water pail, slowly walked to 
the old open well, and drew a bucket full, cool and refresh- 
ing. As supper was safely cooking she sat down on the old 
damp curbing, making an especial effort to tuck her shabby 
shoes under her dress. 

"What's the use of it all?" she said, tying and retying 
the strijigs of her blue sunbonnet. "Shall I ever amount to 
anything?" Two months ago, when Dr. Riley had told her 
that her mother would never see again, she had given herself 
the negative answer. 

Tonight — yes, every minute since — she had been dissat- 
isfied with her answer. Was her life, the life that promised 
so much in college, to be nothing but a round of unpleasant 
tasks? Was her mission only to wash dishes and cook, out 
here on the old country farm? Surely no one could imagine 
anything more commonplace. She had intended to go abroad 
and then — well, her worlfi was big, a world thronged with ad- 
miring people, not narrowed to a lot of hungry chickens. 

"Well, little girl, old sol says to expect rain tomorrow, 
doesn't he?" cheerily rang out her father's voice as he came 
laden with arms full of wood from the low rambling shed. 
"Why, what's the matter, Kate; is your mother worse?" 

"Oh, no, father — pardon me — I — I really didn't expect 
you so soon; supper is about ready. Will you milk old Bossy 
before you get ready to eat?" 

Kate's father sat down on the old well curb and pulled 
the anxious girl close beside him. For two months he had 
noticed her very closely, but this was his first chance to talk 
with her alone. Kate forgot the old blue overalls and patched 
shirt as he talked. She saw first the rough calloused hands, 
clasping tightly the last summer's hat. Then as she realized 
her false position, her eyes were raised to his, and the talk 
ceased. 

Supper was a quiet meal that night; and Kate didn't 
tarry long before she climbed the carpetless stairs to her own 
Page Fourteen 



tBiit College (Jlreetingsf 




room. She wasn't sleepy — far from it — but she had to be 
alone. 

"Was her father right? Had she really been selfish? 
Just what was it he had said about her world being what she 
made it? The change didn't come quickly, for it was very 
late that night when a new Kate met her father as he came 
up to bed. "Good night, father; call me early in the morn- 
ing. I want to try some pear honey tomorrow. I had fine 
luck making it one day at college." 

Helen Moore, '13. 

METRICAL TRANSLATIONS FROM TERENCE 

Terence, Phormio— Act I. Sc. II, 1. 80—92. 
At first no evil came to ours, but Phaedria 
Became enamored of a little musician. He then began 

to love her very much; she was 

The servant of a man who dealt in slaves. 
ISTb price for her was paid, their fathers thought of that. 
So he could only feast his eyes upon her then. 
And follow her, then take her to and from her school. 
We gave this task to Phaedria who had the time. 
Exactly opposite the school to which she went 
There was a barber shop; we often stopped in there. 
Awaited her till time when she should start for home. 
One day while we were waiting a certain sad young man 
Came running in to us. We wondered why he wept. 

Flossie Fletcher, 1915. 

Terence, Phormio— Act I, Sc. II, 1. 91-111. 

While we waited in the barber shop and told the news, 
A sad faced boy rushed in and wept about the wrong 
That lack of money brought and heaped upon the poor. 
"Just now," he said, "I saw a pretty little maid 
Whose mother had just died and left her all alone. 
N^o friend was there to aid. I'm sorry for the girl." 
We went across the street where the mother was laid 
out. 

Indeed the girl was beautiful beyond all words. 
Though her hair was dishevelled, she unkempt, her gar- 
ments torn. 

Her face tear stained and sad. It was a wretched sight. 

Page Fifteen 




Vl^ift CoUcge <§reetingg 



My master's nephew said, "She is a pretty girl.'' 
Our boy in pity then 'began to love her well. 

Katherine Aldrich, '15. 
Act I, Sc. II, Phormio 

(Geta) In what great danger are we! (Davos) What 
is this? 

(Geta) You'll know, if you can keep it still. 

(Davos) Go to, you stupid man, you fear to trust with 
words, one then, so tried in cash? What gain would I ob- 
tain in cheating you, my friend? 

(Geta) Then listen here. (Davos) I'm hearing all, with 
both my ears. 

(Geta) Davos, you know of Chremes, our old man's 
brother? (Davos) Why what! 

(Geta) How's that? You knew his son, the boy, as 
well? 

(Davos) As well as you. (Geta) Now, both old men 
have gone, the one to Lemnos went, our's to another town to 
see his old friend, who had told him of much wealth he'd get. 

(Davos) He had so much and yet he wanted more, you 



say 



(Geta) Yet, this is true to life. (Davos) I should have 
been a king! (Geta) Now both have gone, and left the boys 
for me to guard. Honore Limerick, '15, 

Terence, Phormio— Act II, Sc. Ill, Ic. 348-359. 

De. Was ever such a shameful wrong done any man as 
this you hear has just been foully done to me? 

Ge. I say he's angry now if e'er I saw him so. 

Ph. Just watch me stir him up. I ask you once again, 
Does that man you call master say he doesn't know 

His son's wife claims him as her nearest living kin? 

Ge. I'm sure he says he never heard of her before. 

Ph. And does he still deny he knew her father, too? 

De. I think the man I told about is there; let's see. 

Ph. He says he doesn't know who Stilpho was? 

Ge. That's so. 

Ph. Because the poor girl needed friends and was in 
want. 

She was neglected. See what wrong is done by greed. 

Ge. You'll hear what you don't like if you charge my 
master so. 

Louise Harries, '15. 

Page Sixteen 



tE'fit Collep ^reettngse 



Faculty Committee— Miss Weaver, Miss Tanner, Miss Neville 
Editor -Lois M. Coultas 

Associate Editors — Elizabeth Tendick, Letta Irwin, Mary Lawson 
Business Managers— Elizabeth Dunbar, Emily Jane Allan, Helena 
Munson 

Interested as we are at this time, in the work of our own 
college for an Endowment and Improvement Fund, we have 
watched with especial sympathy the magnificent effort of the 
University of Chattanooga for their $500,000 fund. The 
campaign closed on November the first with thp $500,000 
raised. 

The General Education Board had promised $150,000, if 
friends of the university raised the remainder. Of this 
amount citizens of Chattanooga contributed $215,000, the 
people of Holster Conference, in which the university is sit- 
uated, gave $45,000, while outside friends gave the other 
necessary $90,000. The success of the university in raising 
this sum is due, in a large measure, to the noble and tireless 
efforts of the President, Dr. Race. The campaign, we should 
note, began two years ago, although the active work was 
largely accomplished during the last six months. 

This movement at Chattanooga is understood aright 
only when we link it to similar endeavors now being made in 
the college world. For instance, Goucher of Baltimore is en- 
gaged in raising a general fund of $1,000,000. Two weeks 
ago, a whirlwind campaign in Baltimore was made, and from 
the city itself $470,000 was raised. Beaver College, a college 
for women, near Pittsburg, is also starting out on a cam- 
paign — one in which her effort is to raise $500,000. The cry- 
ing need of any college is endowment. Only through endow- 
ment can she be permanent and improve as steadily and sure- 
ly as she should. 

Here, too, is the most pressing need of our Woman's Col- 
lege. Last spring, on April the fourteenth, was inaugurated 
the movement for an Endowment and Improvement Fund of 
$180,000; by June the first $55,000 of the required amount 

Page Seventeen 




Wbt CoUege #reetinssf 




had been secured. Such have been the beginnings. Now, 
ISTovember the twenty-ninth, marks the beginning of the ac- 
tive campaign in Jacksonville and its environs for help in 
raising the money, and by so doing giving to Woman's Col- 
lege the particular help that she needs at this time. During 
the past, while I. W. C. has meant a great deal to the city in 
a financial way, scarcely $30,000 has been given to the college 
by the city. The future of the college, for the next few years, 
at least, depends in a large measure upon the raising of this 
endowment fund. At a recent meeting of many of the busi- 
ness men of Jacksonville, was passed the resolution that in 
the opinion of these men, the city of Jacksonville could and 
should immediately pledge itself to raise one-third of the 
$180,000. 

This movement, however, is not one of interest only to 
the people and the business men of Jacksonville. It is of 
very vital interest to every girl in school. We hold ourselves 
as loyal daughters of I. W. C; the loyalty and love we bear 
finds now a very definite way of expressing itself. Enthu- 
siasm we cannot help giving; work and possibly some sacrifice 
we must give. This is the most critical time so far in the his- 
tory of the AVoman's College, and the rapid growth for the 
next few years depends upon our success this year. Dr. Har- 
ker, in the past nineteen years, has done more than we can 
properly estimate to upbuild the school. Though we may 
never thank him sufficiently, we can show our gratitude and 
appreciation of his work by rallying around him as our leader, 
and by willingly and gladlv doing all we can by work and 
sacrifice to help him in the work he has undertaken. 

JUNIOR-SENIOR PARTY 

They say that anticipation is better than realization, but 
the Seniors assert that this was not true in the case of the 
dinner party enjoyed at the Peacock Inn Saturday the ninth. 
There is nothing more enjoyable than a dinner party, anyway. 

Page Eighteen 




Wiit CoUege ^vtttixiQfi 



and with such admirable hostesses as the Juniors the realiza- 
tion could not but be better than the anticipation. We 
Seniors enjoyed everything from the big jar of chrysanthe- 
mums in the center of the table, to the dainty carnation fa- 
vors, and the very up-to-date place cards with Wilson starting 
the Democratic mule which has balked for so many years. It 
is not necessary to say we enjoyed the menu, and appreciated, 
highly, the music and "stunts" which concluded the delight- 
ful evening, and the best thing of all was just to bide a bit 
with the Juniors themselves — they're dear folks. 



THE INDIANA STUNT 

Early in the fall an Indiana Club of thirty members was 
organized, and while we have never been allowed to forget 
the club's existence, its first public appearance was not made 
until the morning chapel of November the fifteenth. To the 
accompaniment of a lively march, on that morning, the club, 
stiff and rustling in white starched skirts and waists, and 
brilliant in red ties and collars, marched solemnly in, before 
the appreciative eyes of the assembled girls. With a spirit 
and zeal befitting their state, the members rendered the Song 
of the Indiana Club, after which they tossed their long red 
streamers over the heads of the girls in front. 
Come and join in song together. 

Shout with might and main. 
Our beloved Indiana, 
Sound her praise again 
Chorus I — 

Gloriana, Frangipani, 
Loyal Hoosiers, we; 
Formed the club of Indiana 
At I. W. C. 
Verse II — 

For a Woman's College training 

See how we aspire. 
Changing cars at every station. 
Struggling through your mire. 

Page Nineteen 




Wi)t CoUege (ireetmgjf 




Chorus II — 

Leave we sad our interurbans 

And our roads so fine, 
Facing mud and lost connections 
When we cross the line. 

Yerse III — 

Illinois may boast her cornfields, 

Athens of the West, 
What are Indiana's products? 

Authors of the best. 

Chorus III— 

Riley, Wallace, Ade and Beveridge, 

Meredith, Nicholson, 
Stratton, Porter and McCutcheon, 
Abe Marten, Tarkington. 

Here's to her whose name we'll ever 

Cherish in our song, 
Honor, love and true devotion 

All to her belong. 



HALLOWE'EN PARTY 

For a whole week before the event curiosity was at its 
highest. The big black cat poster invited us to 
"Come to the party on Hallowe'en night. 
And flirt with the spooks to our heart's delight. 
There'll be little ones, big ones, fat ones and lean. 
Sports for the crowd, it's plain to be seen," 
but divulged none of the mysterious secrets. The first at- 
traction was the splendid picnic supper served down in the 
Domestic Science kitchen. At seven o'clock we assembled in 
the chapel, fearful and wonderful creations that most of us 
were. The opening number was given by the Dutch and 
American bands, alias third year Academy and Academy Spe- 
cials. Then in all seriousness we found ourselves witnessing 
the wedding of the first and second year Academy. By aid 
Page Twenty 



■BBatSBMBfflcmKgW^Za 




Wtit College ^ttttinqi 



of the mystic powers the curtain of the future was now drawn 
aside and we could clearly recognize many of the worthy 
Juniors and Seniors of 1913, even busier than we had been 
accustomed to see them, for this was registration day at the 
popular finishing school, which they had started. Next came 
the pumpkin maidens in whom might occasionally be seen 
the likenesses of Senior Preps. They appeared ten strong, 
but their numbers gradually decreased until at last we saw 
only a pumpkin pie. Another turn in the course of events 
and we nerved ourselves for the battle of the witches, which 
in number of participants compared favorably with the Fresh- 
man class. Now that war was over the enthusiastic Sopho- 
more suffragettes presided at a session in congress and con- 
sidered many of the mighty questions of the day. With the 
adjournment of this meeting we followed the jack-o'-lanterns 
and found our "Special" friends ready to disclose to us our 
fate or appease us with apples, doughnuts and popcorn balls. 

LORADO TAFT 

On Monday night, November eleventh, Lorado Taft, 
sculptor, gave the second number on the artists' course, 
"American Sculptors and Sculpture." 

Mr. Taft himself needs no introduction to an Illinois 
audience; for his contributions to the Chicago World's Fair, 
his heroic figures in some of our larger cities, his wonderful 
ideal groups of "The Sightless" and the "Solitude of the 
Soul," combined with his interest and contributions of mu- 
nicipal art interests in Chicago and his broadening influence 
on the lives and works of the younger generation of sculptors, 
have made him recognized everywhere as one of the ablest 
authorities on art subjects in America, 

Mr. Taft is an easy, fluent speaker, full of spontaneity 
and charm, alive with humor, and he kept his audience inter- 
ested during an evening of the highest educational value. His 
lecture covered American sculpture from the time of Green- 
ough, Powers and Crawford to St. Gaudens, French, Barnard 

Page Twenty-one 




tirtie CoUcge (^rcetingg 



g^ 



and the younger sculptors of today, showing a large number 
of illustrations of their representative works, giving to the 
audience a comprehensive grasp of what American sculpture 
has been and of its future promise. 

COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

Quite a number of students of the college are assisting in 
the choir at Grace church. This work is not only a pleasure, 
but is also very helpful to the students on account of the 
high grade of music used. 

Helen Jones sang at the evening service of October 
twenty-seventh at Grace church and Helen Harrison gave a 
violin solo on November third. 

An analytical harmony class has been started in charge of 
Miss Hay. This class in nowise interferes with the college 
harmony class. It is, on the other hand, more of an incentive 
to the student to enter the college harmony class. This course 
is free of charge and open to all students in this department. 

A recent letter from Mr. Phillips indicates he has com- 
menced his work in Paris under Oscar Seagle. It will be re- 
membered that Mr. Seagle appeared in a recital in Jackson- 
ville last winter. 

An informal students' recital was given Thursday, No- 
vember seventh at 4:15. The program differed from other 
recitals, as all divisions of the department were represented. 
For the first time an organ number was given on the Thurs- 
day afternoon recital. The program was as follows: 

Piano — Hungarian MacDowell 

Mary Easley. 

Piano — Scherzo in Canon Form Jodassohn 

Moss Carter. 

Voice — Four Songs Arthur Curry 

Ima Berryman. 

Piano — Second Mazurka Leschetizky 

Anne Fitzpatrick. 

Page Twenty -two 




C{)e College ^tettinqi 




Organ — Cradle Song Buck 

Alice Mathis. 

Two Pianos — ^Egmont Overture Beethoven 

Moss Carter, Lucile Olinger, Letta Irwin, Anne Fitzpatrick. 

Violin — Scene de Ballet De Beriot 

Helen Harrison. 

Piano — Pochinelle Raclinianinoff 

Deane Obermeyer. 

This program was also representative of the good work 
being done, as most of this work was of an extremely high 
grade for the informal students' recital. A larger audience 
than usual greeted the performers. 

Most of the dates for the faculty recitals have been set 
and are as follows: 

Miss Beebe, December 9. 

Director and Associate Director Swarthout in joint pro- 
gram, January 37. 

Miss Nicholson, February 24. 

Miss Miller, March 17. 

Mrs. Hartmann, April 7. 

These recitals by local artists, in addition to the four mu- 
sical numbers in the artists' course, will furnish an unusual 
treat for the students as well as to the people of Jacksonville. 

On the evening of October twenty-eighth. Director Swar- 
thout gave an informal lecture before the Literary Union, his 
subject being "Place of Music in Our Public Education." 

Director and Associate Director Swarthout were called 
out of the city October twenty-ninth to attend the funeral of 
their grandmother, Mrs. Robert Smith, of Dixon, Illinois. 

"We are glad to have the organ again in use in our chapel 
service after about two weeks of disuse. An improvement has 
already been added to the organ in the form of an automatic 
starter to take the place of a hand starter originally installed. 

Miss Miller visited in Decatur over Sunday, November 
third. Miss Bedbe substituting for her in the quartet at Grace 
church. Miss Beebe also sang a solo in the morning service. 

Page Twenty-three 




Wiit CoUege Greetings; 




SOCIETY NOTES 

Belles Lettres varied the study of early art in the meet- 
ing of October the twenty-ninth by an extemporaneous pro- 
gram. The girls responded in a highly original and clever 
manner and were greatly commended by the society. 

In a later program Miss Johnston gave a very delightful 
and instructive talk on Roman Art, dwelling particularly on 
architecture, painting and sculpture as evidenced in the 
Eoman house. She illustrated her talk with the especially 
fine Roman views in the Latin department. The society 
greatly enjoyed the talk and appreciated her kindness in giv- 
ing it. The girls are finding their study of art more and more 
profitable and interesting. 

One of the most delightful pleasures the Belles Lettres 
girls have had this year was an evening spent at the Country 
Club. The club was opened to them through the kindness 
of one of its patrons, and the unusual opportunity was en- 
joyed to the utmost. The girls strolled over the links and 
courts while the sunset was at its loveliest, but at the ap- 
proach of twilight returned to the club house, where Miss 
Miller's exquisite music furnished pleasure until luncheon 
was served. After the toasts to our chaperone, Mrs. Gates, 
and her very charming response, the girls gathered in the big 
reception room and toasted marshmallows before the fire- 
place. 

Once more the Thread of Blue has drawn one of our 
number back for a visit. Rhea Smith Roth from the Black 
Hills of South Dakota is here for another glimpse of I. W. C. 
and to see her friends still remaining from 1910-11. 

Our treasurer had the pleasure of adding twenty-five 
dollars to our credit. This sum was sent to Phi Nu by Judge 
Kimborough of Danville, Illinois, as a memorial of his wife, 
a Phi Nu of many years ago. 

The open meeting for the new Academy girls was held 
October twenty-nine. A Hallowe'en program was given. 

Page Twenty-four 



BBB^EaEBOa 




tltiit CoUege (greeting^ 




Y. W. C. A. 

The first monthly missionary meeting was held Sunday, 
October the twentieth, with an attendance of about two hun- 
dred. Miss Neville gave a very interesting talk on a part of 
her trip through Palestine, using the lantern to illustrate 
some of the most picturesque and unusual scenes. 

One of the most successful features of the campaign for 
Mission Study was the series of teas given on the evening of 
Friday, October the eighteenth, by the leaders of the various 
classes. Among the "stunts" done in each room, the Chinese 
Wedding and the Mormon family group were especially 
clever. The following study classes were announced for this 
semester: 

The Chinese Eevolution — Abbie Peavoy. 

Islam, a Challenge to Faith — Helena Munson. 

Mormonism — Celia Cathcart. 

The Light of the World — Lois Coultas. 

The Unoccupied Fields — Hallie Clem. 

The Uplift of China — Anna Heist. 

The work closed with personal invitations to the girls 
to join classes and resulted in forty-five more members than 
last year, or two-thirds of the Association members. 

The members of the cabinet and devotional committee 
enjoyed the privilege of a private conference with Bishop 
McDowell during his visit to the college. 

Abbie Peavoy and Euth Want led two Y. W. Sunday 
evening services at which some practical problems of college 
life were discussed. The first Sunday in November the fac- 
ulty conducted a very helpful Y. W. meeting. Effective talks 
were given by Dean Weaver, Miss Neville and Miss Jennie 
Anderson, 

Three ambitious Y. W. girls bought the chicken and 
buns that were not used by the Grace church ladies at their 
night lunch counter on election night, made them into sand- 
wiches and sold them the next morning after chapel, clearing 
eight dollars for the Y. W. scholarship fund. 



Page Twenty-five 




Wbt CoUese ^ttttin^i 




The president, Miss Helen Moore, conducted the first 
open business meeting on Friday evening, November the 
eighth. Some important matters were discussed and it is 
hoped that the next one will be better attended. 

The Finance and Social committees served breakfast on 
Founders' Day. 

The Systematic Giving committee is completing its work 
of personal solicitation for monthly giving. 



LOCALS 

After a cross-country hike to which the Seniors chal- 
lenged the Juniors, both classes met at Morgan Lake, where 
the Seniors served an appetizing breakfast cooked over a 
camp fire. 

Mary Watson, president of the Junior class, entertained 
the class at afternoon chocolate on Monday, October the 
twenty-first. 

The first number of the I. W. C. Lyceum Course, a con- 
cert by Maud Powell, was well attended and enthusiastically 
praised. 

Mrs. Rhea Smith Roth of Hot Springs, North Dakota, 
was the guest of Helen Moore and other school friends dur- 
ing the first week of November. Mrs. Roth was a student at 
I. W. C. during the year 1910-11. 

Miss Ethel Harvey, who was a member of our faculty 
three years ago, was married early in the fall to Mr. John 
Thomason. 

Dr. Harker suffered from a severe attack of appendicitis 
the earlier part of the month. 

Miss Weaver, Miss Knopf, Mrs. Taylor and Miss Berger 
were in Chicago for a few days this month, while Miss Van 
Ness visited in Milwaukee and Miss Jennie Anderson and 
Miss Beebe went to their homes in Evanston for a short visit. 

We were especially pleased the first part of the month 
to have at the college Miss Barge, the educational secretary 
Page Twenty-Six 



®i)c CoUegc Greetings; 




of the Woman's Home Missionary Society, who gave two ap- 
pealing chapel talks. 

^^ 
ALUMNA NOTES 

Miss Gertrude York, 1904, is teaching Domestic Science 
in the high school in Tempe, Arizona. The fine new build- 
ing is equipped with every modern convenience for comfort 
and work, and the members of the faculty are all college 
graduates. Miss York's sister, Mattie, is also in the school 
as a substitute teacher. 

The following paragraph is taken from a Los Angeles 
paper: "For the first time in the history of Los Angeles 
county conventions, women sat as accredited delegates. They 
had been chosen by the people of their respective precincts 
to act in representative capacity. They served on commit- 
tees and bore their full share of the burden in the delibera- 
tions. One of their number, Mrs. Lon V. Chapin, made a 
speech which was the hit of the day." 

Mrs. Chapin is a graduate of I. W. C, member of the class 
of 1876. 

In the ceremonies attending the breaking of ground for 
the new West Adams Methodist church in Los Angeles, one 
of the two ladies representing the Aid Society in turning the 
first earth was Mrs. Mary E. Lane, whose I. W. C. days were 
during President Adams' administration. 

A fine Methodist hospital is being planned in Los An 
geles, and one of its most generous gifts is the bequest of 
$5,000 left by Mrs. Sarah Barber Birks, I. W. C. class of 
1856, who had made her home in the city for many years be- 
fore her death. 

The passing of another Los Angeles lady to whose mem- 
ory many beautiful tributes have been paid by the papers, 
the church and various associations with which she was iden- 
tified, interests our alumnae, for Mrs. Frank A. Dewey as 
Miss Emma Eider taught music in the college for several 
years during Dr. Short's presidency. 

Page Twenty-seven 




Ci)c CoUcge (greetings! 




EXCHANGES 

We extend a courteous greeting and word of welcome to 
all our exchanges, new and old. 

The Frances Shimer Eecord shows a diversity of interest 
and contains several good accounts of trips abroad. 

We note that the Augustana Observer has put in the 
pictures of the artists in their Lyceum Course, and we like 
the idea. 

The Hedding Graphic, the Earlhamite, the Oracle, the 
Lincolnian, the Upsala Gazette, we welcome back in our ex- 
change column. 

We enjoyed the October number of the Gallowegian 
very much, but we would suggest that the choice of stories 
reviewed should be improved. 

The November fourth issue of the Pegasus shows im- 
provement over the first numbers. 

Through the Optimist of Christian University we learn 
of the addition of a new gymnasium and two dormitories 
to its present equipment, and extend our congratulations. 

The cover of the Howard Payne Exponent is unusually 
attractive and its literary standard is very good. The ar- 
ticles of the October number are especially interesting. 

The Illinois Wesleyan Argus is one of our most interest- 
ing exchanges. We would suggest that the contents of the 
paper be more systematized, as it would help in the search 
for particular items and articles. 

The articles in the Illinois Advance for October the 
nineteenth are unusually opportune. 



Page Twenty-eight 



iiHiniinMiiiiiiiiniiiiHiiiiiiuiiiniiiiiiniiiniiitiiiiiiiiiniiiiiitiiiiiiiiiimiiiHiHiiimiiiiuniiiiiiiiiiMiHiniHiimiiiiNiiimiiiiitiNniimiiiitHiniininiiiiiimM^ 

Classy Styles We will be pleased to show you our line i 

W. T. REAUGH | 

Fashionable Footwear | 

For All Occasions | 

s 

E 

33 South Side Square Jacksonville, 111. | 



Charley had never before seen his Aunt Ellen, who was 
an ardent suffragette. 

"Well, Charley," said his mother, 'Tiow do you like Aunt 
Ellen?" 

"Oh, I like her all right, but I think she is an awfully 
gentlemanly lady, don't you?" 



OttoSpeith I 

I 

pboto portraiture I 



Member Photographers Associaton of Illinois 



The Watson Studio Southwest Corner Square | 

iiimrnitnimnniiuniiiniinuiinnmnniiiHniiiinnnmiiinmiminimiinimtiimiimimmHnniniimimnimninmmimiimiiimnimMiinmninminniiiimn 



^iiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiMniintiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiMiiiiiiiiiiriiiMiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniii^ 



Miss H., a high school teacher, was slightly deaf, and 
very sensitive about it. One day a girl raised her hand and 
asked: "Please, may I go into the hall and get my handker- 
chief?" 

Miss H., with a puzzled air, looked over the class and 
said: "Can any one answer that question?" 



COTRKLIv & LE)ONARD 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OF 

CAPS 

GOWNS and 
HOODS 

To the American Colleges and Univer- 
sities from the Atlantic to the Pacific; 
Class contracts a specialty. 




Our Prices Make Cleaning 

a Necessity 
Dry Cleaned and Pressed 

Ladies' LJst 

Skirts ... ... . . 50c 

Jackets 50c 

Waists 50c and up 

lyongcoats i.oo 

Dresses . . . . i.oo and up 

Sanitary Cleaning Shop 

214 S. Sandy St, Both Phones 631 
We call for your goods 



I GO TO 

I FOR 

I Fresh Homemade Candies 

I Hot and Cold Sodas 

I All kinds of Fresh and 

I Salted Nuts 

I East State St. 
iiiiiiuMiiiiininiitiiniiiiiiiiiniuiuiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiHHiHiiniiiitiiiiiniinMiiinnininiMiiiiininiHniinnniniiiiiMiiiiiiiiHiiHnMiHniiiiiiiiiiiuniiHiiniMniiitMHi^ 



Ladies' Fine Furs 
E. JENKIN 

15 West Side Square 



„,„„„„„ ,,,„„„,,,,,,,,,„,,,n,iHiiiinHiiiiiHiiHiiiniiiiiniiiiniiiiiiiinimiiHiiHiHiniiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHHiiiiiMiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiMniiiiiit iiuiihiiiiii| 



Dr. Albyn Lincoln Adams I 



DR. KOPPERL 

Dentist 

326 West state St. 



Oculist and Aurist 
to the State School for the Blind 

323 West State Street 

Practice limited to disease* of the 
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 



"Behold the ruins of Pompeii!" 
"Been this way long?" 
"Some eighteen hundred years." 

"Bah! We had San Francisco rebuilt in less than six 
months." 



Dr. R. R. BUCKTHORPE 
Dentist 

111. Phone, House 1054 

Ofi&ce 750 
Bell Phone, Office 512 
Over Hatch Drug Store 

Jacksonville, 111. 



DR. BYRON S. GAILE^Y 

EYE 
EAR 
NOSE 
THROAT 

340 West State Street 



Th? Colley<? Girl 

The Summer winds were kind to you | 
And left your face an Indian hue 
But when your school work you plan 
Of course you want to lose your tan. 
So use VARA Greaseless Cream 

25 cents the jar. 
Armstrong's Drug Store S. W. Cor- 
ner Square. 



DR. CARL E. BLACK i 

Office— 349 E. State St. f 

Both Phones 85 f 

Residence 1305 West State St. | 

Both Phones 285 | 

Surgery — Passavant Memorial Hospital | 

and Our Saviours Hospital | 

Hospital Hours— 9:00 a. m. to 12 m. | 

Office Hours— 1:30 to 4 p. m. Even- | 
ings and Sundays by appointment | 

X 

iiiiiiiMHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiniuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniHiinnniimnnmiHii£ 



I""""""""""""""" "'"'"'""'"""'"'•"""""''""'»""'""""""'mnniiHmii»ininriiniiinirimHiiniiriiMiiiiiiiiii,,,„,,,„„ 

I It is our business to get new goods for you 

I We are never fully satisfied with our stock, but keep con- 

I stantly adding to it in order that no customer's needs maybe over- 

{ looked. Besides we believe it our duty to be forever watchful ol 

I the markets and so secure "EVERYTHING" and "THE BEST" 

j We do not depend on onlyone line to make a profit— hence 

I can sell cheaper. 

I A complete line of Drugfs and Groceries 

|phone.800 K.OBEIK.TS BI^OS. Phon., «. 

I Open every working day and night. 
I 29 South Side Sq. 



"How do you like the new minister?" asked Mrs. 
Streeter. 

"I think he is magnificent/' answered her friend, "and 
just the man we need. Why, his closing prayer this morning 
was really the most eloquent one I ever heard addressed to 
a Boston audience." 



A Wottidn's Store 

I nilecl with the Luxuries and Necessities which appeai 
I to the heart of even/ woman 

I Advanced Sly les at 

I Moderate Prices 

I 

I We take a pride in proclaiming that we have the 

I lightest, brightest store in the State of Illinois, filled by 

I a rapidly changing stock of attractive merchandise, and 

I catering ever to the wants of young women. 
I Coats Suits Dresses Costumes 

I Waists Gloves Hosiery Jewelry 

I Laces Ribbons Corsets Neckwear 

j Linens Notions Art Goods Handkerchiefs 



•^ # »^ ^ss^ss«# ^^sssi# »iS5jJ m^4 <s,^^.rf ^^v^^v^%. .... 

i LADIES* AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. 

"'"""""""""""""""" '""""""""•"""'"•"imniii.nii.iiiii.uii .iiiiiinii..,.,„„.„„„„„„„„,„,„„„„,„,„„„„„„„„„ „,„„„„„„„„„,„„„„,„„ 



iNUimiiwiMiitiiMniiiMiiMiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiMMiiiinMiMiiiMiMiiHiniiiiniHiiinHHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiriiMiiriiiiiiii^ 

GEO. T. DOUGLAS 
Fancy Groceries 



234 West State St. 



738 East North St. 



Miss K. — Yes, she is the only woman captain of a vessel 
on the Atlantic coast. Some people said she would not be 
able to stand the strain, but when it came to physical endur- 
ance in the drills she held out longer than any other man 
there. 



IVIeTrIt^J 

Jacksonville's Largest Mens' Store 

Pennants and Banners 

[. W. G. and Fraternity special designs 

Mannish Cut Sweater Coats 

Hand Bag's, Trunks 

and Suits Cases 



GIRLS 

Our Baby Minnette Photo 
is just the thing 
you are looking for 
Call and see 

McDougall 

The West State Street 

Photogradher 



PACIFIC 

Jacksonville's Best and most 
Popular 

HOTEL 

The Home of the Traveling Man 
Jno. B. Snell, Prop. 
Rates $2.25, $2.50, and $3.00 per day 
One Block West of Womans College 
Opposite Post Office 
Rooms with or without bath 
Local and Long Distance Telephone 

in every room. 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



uiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiminniniiiiiN 



^iiiiiiHiiiiiiiiniiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiuiiniliniiiuiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiinllilniiitiiiiiNiMiiiiiiiMiiHiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiintiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiNiii^ 

a 

I SKIRT BOXERS 

I ROCKERS. SCREENS, DESKS 

I AND BED ROOM CURTAINS 

I AT 

IJohnson, Hackett Sl Guthrie 



The traveling salesman had four minutes to catch his 
train. 

"Can't you go faster than this?" he asked the street car 
conductor. 

"Yes," the bell ringer answered, "laut I have to stay with 
my car." 



I KODAK FINISHING 

s 

|Vulcan Roll Films 

I Cameras from $2.00 up 

s 

E 

lEverythingf strictly first class 

I 

I Claude B. Vail 

|Oswald'» Drug Store 71 E. Side Sq. 



IFrank Elliott, Pres. Wm. R. Routt, Vice-Pres. 

i C. A. Johnson, Vice-Pres. 

I J. Weir Elliott, Cashier 

s J. AUerton Palmer, Asst, Cashier 



[ELLIOTT STATE BANK 

z 

i Jacksonville, 111. 



Capital 
Undivided Profits 

Frank Elliott 
J. Weir Elliott 
Wm. R. Routt 
Wm. S. EUoitt 



$150,000 
- $ 15,000 

Frank R. Elliott 
John A. Bellatti 
C. A. Johnson 



Piepenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 



HERE TO PLEASE 



Candies 
Cookies 
Sandwiches 
Groceries 



Cakes 

Pies 

Pop on Ice 

California Fruits 



School Supplies 



Girls 



Don't forg-et our Advertisers 



HiiHinimHinniiiiiiiuiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuHiiiHiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiimiiriniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu 



uuHiiuiuiiiiuiuiiuutMHiiiiitiiiiiiiuiiiniiiiuiHuiuiiittniiiiuiiiiuiwiiuuiiiuuniiumiwiiiimuiiMnimiHnimttMiuuHuiiHHHi^ 

i 

The bride s first choice for the home? f 



Seen on the screen the night of the election: "N. M. 
reported for Wilson." 

Miss I: "Well, what does N. M. stand for? North Min- 
nesota?" 



House Furnishings of Quality I 

from the I 

ANDRE & ANDRE I 

Our Special Room Furnishings will interest every student | 



HOFFMAN'S 

Lunch Room 

opposite Depots 

609-611 East State Street 

Jacksonville, 111. 



Len G. Magill 
Printer 

East State Street lU. Phone 418 



Montgomery & Deppe 

Everything in Dry Goods 
Well Lighted First Floor Cloak and Suit Room 

Agents for the readies Home Journal Patterns 
The new "Howd" front Imced corsets 



"iiMiiiiiMiMminniiMiHimiiiniiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiimiiiiHiiiiiiMiniiiiniiiiHiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiiiMiiiiniiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiniiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniriiiiniiiiim 




FALL Footwear 

OUR SPEClAlvTY 

Dress Slippers 
Street Shoes 
5?droom Slippers 

We Repair Shoes 



Donald and Jeannie were putting down a carpet. Donald 
slammed the end of his thumb with the hammer and began 
to swear. 

"Donald! Donald!" shrieked Jeannie, "dunna swear that 
way!" 

"WummunI" vociferated Donald, "gin ye know any 
better way, now is the time to let me know it!" 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Fancy Bazaar 
and Millinery 

211 West state Street 



TAYLOR'S 



Grocery 

A g-ood place to trade 
221 West State Street 



Illinois Phone 419 Bell Phone 417 

A. L. Bromley 

Ladies' Tailor 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and 
Repairing. Ladies' Man Tail- 
ored Suits to order. Remodeling 
of all kinds. Special rates to 
I. W. C. students. All work 
called for and delivered promptly 



GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 



iimiiiiiMiiiiitiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiMmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiniMiiiMiimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiMiii i iiiiii jiiiii>^ 

College Jewelry | 

Engraved Cards and Invitations | 

Chafing Dishes, Copper and Brass Goods | 

Special Die Stationery | 

21 South Side Square I 



Three French boys studying Shakespeare were render- 
ing portions of it into English. Their translations for "To 
be or not to be" were as follows: (1) "To was or not to am." 
(2) "To were or is to not.'' (3) "To should or not to will." 




jAGKSOMVft.Le, ILL» 

Established 1890 

Low Prices Square Dealing- 
Keep us busy 



111. Phone 57 

Presh Drug's, 
Fancy Goods 
Stationery 



Bell Phone 92 



THE 



BaOfler Druo Store 

2 doors West of Postoffice 



Florence Kirk King 
Hair Dresser 

Now prepared to manufact- 
ure French hair and combings 
into the 1912-1913 styles. 

Shampooing and scalp mas- 
sage by appointment at your 
residence. 

Illinois Phone 837 
Residence 503 West College Street 



If only you'll | 

Remember Cherry's | 

We'll be pleased, and we | 

know positively that you'll \ 

find no cause for complaint. I 

Our horses are safe; our equi- | 

pages have character and in- | 

dividuality, and our prices are | 

most reasonable. | 

Cherry's Livery | 

Both Phones Jacksonville, 111. | 
iiiiiiiiuiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiii: 



^MiimiMiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitii iiiiiitiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Cafe 



Confectionary 



B^eacock Inn 



Catering- 



Soda 



Candies 



An instructor in a Washington preparatory school one 
day made the statement that "every year a sheet of water 
fourteen feet thick is raised to the clouds from the sea." 

"At what time of the year does this occur?" asked a 
Freshman. "It must be a sight worth going a long way to 
see." 



Oswald's 

Drug Store 

71 East Side Sq. 

TOIIvET ARTICI.es 

PERFUMES 
FINE STATIONERY 



I Ladies' High Grade, Late Style 
I FUR SCARFS and MUFFS 

I ARE SOLD BY 

I Frank Byrns 

1 Most Reasonable Prices 



^inininiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiuiiinMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiniiMiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiinini^^ 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 East State St. Jacksonville, 111. 

Illinois Phone 388 



Pictorial Review Patterns 

For Sale at 



cz: 




^ 



DRY GOODS STORE 



iiiiHiiiiiHiMiiniHiiiiniMiiiiiiUMiniiiininiiiiiiiiiiinMiMiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiMtiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniMiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiMiniiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiii^ 

It will pay you to visit | 

SCHRAM'S I 

Jewelry Store | 



Harry had received a military outfit, but on his mother's 
saying, "Why how like a soldier you look!" had replied: 
"Yes — but, mamma, I've been looking at a picture of Na- 
poleon, and he has a scubbing brush on each shoulder.'^ 



ncy Articles Christmas Goods 

COOVKR & SHRE^VE'S 
Drug Store 



Kodaks and Supplies 

Developing and Finishing 



Dorwart MarK6t 

VI,Iv KINDS OF FRESH and 

SAIvT MEATS, FISH, 

POUIvTRY, ETC. 

Both Phones 196 230 W. State St. 



COOK 

LIGHT with GAS 

HE^AT 

Jacksonville Railway & 
Ivig"ht Company 

224 South Main Street 



Ask your grocer for 

HOLSUM 

BREAD 

Made Clean. Delivered clean 
in waxed paper wrappers 



iiiniiiiiiiiiimniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiHiniiiinininiiiiMniniMiiiininiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiHM 



^iiiiinininiitiiiiniiMiiiiiiiinnnniitniiiiiiiiiitiiMiMiiiiiniiiiiinniiiiinnininiiinninniiniiMiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiniiiininitiiiniiiiiiMniiinniniiiiiiiiiniiiiiiMiiiMim^^^ 

I For those who discriminate 

I We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to 

I please the students who come to our city. We select only the 

I best materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. 

I Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and 

I Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. 

I Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all 

I College functions. 

I Vickery 3c Merrigan 

I CATERERS 

I 227 West State Street 



Saxon — "It's a fine morning, Sandy." (Sandy grunts). 
Saxon — "I said it was a fine morning, Sandy." 
Sandy — "Verra weel, verra weel; I dinna want tae 
argue." 



Hillerby's 

Dry Goods Store 

Safest Place 
to Trade 



The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital , . . |2oo,ooo 
Surplus . . 32,000 

Deposits . . . 1,100,000 

U. S. Depositor}' for Postal Saving Bank 

Julius E. Strawn, President 
Miller Weir, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear 

H. J. Rogers, A. A. Curry 

C. B. Graff 



Brady Brothers 

Hardware, Cutlery 
Paints 



C. S.MARTIN 

Fine Pictures — Artistic Framing 

Frames and Ovals of all 

descriptions and sizes 

Imported and Domestic 
Wall Paper 

314 W. State St., Scott Block 

Jacksonville, 111. 



TJiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiMiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiMiiiii iiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimniitiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiMiiiNiiHiiiiiiiiiimii.< 



iiiiHiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiniiiiiMiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiii^ 

The most dainty thing's in Rings and Jewelry. I 

New and handsome styles of goods in Sterling Silver | 

Hig-hest grades of Cut Glass, and every | 

description of Spectacles and Eye Glasses | 

Fine Diamonds a Specialty ^ | 

at I 

RUSSELL& LYON'S f 

West Side Square | 

Both Phones 96 | 



An Irishman meeting a friend said: "^'Ah, to whom do 
yoii think I have just been speaking? Your old friend Pat- 
rick, faith! And he is grown so thin I hardly knew him. 
You are thin and I am thin, but he is thinner than both of 
us put together." 





F. E. Farrell E. E. Crabtree 


= 


/lathis, Kamm & Shibe say 


Established 1864 


= 


We can furnish your 
Shoes and Party Slippers 


P. G. FARRE^LL & CO. 




in the popular styles, 


BANKERS 


i 


leathers, and 
fabrics 


Successors to First National Bank 


s 

i 
i 




Jacksonville, 111. 


1 




ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 



niiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiniiiiiniiiiiiniiiHiiiiininiiiniiiniiiininiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiniiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinininiiiiiiniiiiiiiiimiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiilii 



::niiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinMiiiniiiiiiii^ 



J. A. OBERMEYER 



HARRY P. OBERMEYER 



CITY DRUG AND BOOK STORE 

Stationery, Pennants, Novelties, Drugs and 
TOILET REQUISITES 

Quality Counts — We Count 
Phones: Illinois 572, Bell 457 Corner South Main St: and Square 



A congressman, at a meeting of G. A. R.'s, protesting 
against a proposed measure of tlie legislature, painted the 
situation in such black colors that an earnest auditor, over- 
come by the recital, jumped to his feet, exclaiming: "Com- 
rades, is it possible that we have died in vain?" 



(HARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO. 

I Designs, Cut Flowers, 

I Plants 

i Southwest Corner Square 

I Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

I Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

I Greenhouses, Bell 775 



THE SATISFACTION 
we enjoy through selling you 

OUR FINE SHOES 

is equaled only by 

YOUR SATISFACTION 

in wearing them 

Evening Slippers 

Jas. McGinnis & Co 

62 East Side Square 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING 

for the latest in Suits. Ladies' Underwear, Ribbons 

Laces. Embroidery Materials or Notions 

Visit the store that carries the 

up-to-date merchandise 

F=HEL_I=S & OSBOFRIME 



:!iii;i!!i;!iimiiiiiiMiiiitiii!iniitmitiiiiiiiiiniii<i" 




'S COLLEGE 



College of Liberal Arts 

(Full classical and scientific courses) 

College ot Music 

School of Fine Arts 

School of Expression 

School of Home Economics 

^A Standard College — one of the best. 
Regular college and academy courses 
leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- 
inently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located 
in the Middle West, in a beautiful, 
dignified, old college town, noted for 
its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends 
who are looking for a good college. 

Call or address, Registrar 

Illinois Woman's College, 

Jacksonville, 111. 




Illllllllllllllllllllll IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



riiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiinmiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinNiiiiiinniiiiiinnniii^ 

J. I^. ^Br^o^w^n 

I she)e:t music, music me^rchandise 

I TALKING MACHINES, RECORDS 

I AND SUPPLIES 

I 19 SOUTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE 



On her way to prayer meeting, Mrs. Styles passed the 
Bsown houee, and seeing Donald on the porch, said: "Aren't 
you afraid out there alone, Donald?" 

"I'm not alone." 

"Oh, who's with you? Ellen?" 

"No; if you was a good woman, Mrs. Styles, you would 
know who was with me." 



Ayers 



Capital 
$200,000 

Surplus 
$50,000 

Deposits 
$1,000,000 

FOUNDED 1852 




The combined capi 
tal and surplus of this 
bank is 

One Quarter 
Million 
Dollars 

the largest of any bank 
in Morgan County. 

UNITED STATES 
DEPOSITORY 



OFFICERS 
M. F. Dunlap, President O. F. Buffe, Cashier 

Andrew Russel, Vice President R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashiei 

R. M. Hockenhull. Vice President H. C. Clement, Asst. Cashier 

C. G. Rutledge, Vice President 



Owen P. Thompson 
Edward F. Goltra 
John W. Leach 



DIRECTORS 
George Deitrick 
R. M. Hockenhull 
M. F. Dunlap 



Harry M. Capps 
O. F. Buffe 
Andrew Russel 



iiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiininiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiiiiiininiMMNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiHiiiiHniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimminiiiiimiiiiiiiiniiiiniiimiiiiiiiiiiiiu 



Cije College #teetmgg 

^ The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 

€jf Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month. 

^ Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies 15c. 
€j| Entered at Jacksonville PostofEce as second class matter. 



Contents 

Joy 'O Ivife 5 

Editorial 14 

Thanksgiving 15 

Endowment Stunt ... 16 

I^ocals 17 

Society Notes 21 

Indiana Breakfast 24 

College of Music 25 

Home Economics 27 

Expression Notes , 28 

Y. W. C. A 28 




FROM PAINTING BY BARA81NG 

MADONNA OF THE OLIVE BRANCH. 



There's a song in the air! 

There's a star in the sky! 
There's a mother's deep prayer, 

And a baby's low cry! 
And the star rains its fire while the beautiful sing, 
For the manger of Bethlehem cradles a King! 

In the light of that star 

Lie the ages impearled; 
And that song from afar 

Has swept over the world. 
Every hearth is aflame, and the beautiful sing 
In the homes of the nations that Jesus is King! 

• — Holland 



\ 




Zbc CollCQC (3reetin96 

Vol. XVI Jacksonville, 111., Christmas 191a No. 4 



JOY 'O LIFE 

The fire glowed and crackled in time with the old clock, 
which was patiently but surely ticking away the precious 
minutes of the day the newspapers declared was the 
"Eleventh Shopping Day Before Christmas." 

"Eleven, and if things were as ordinary human events 
should be, there would only be six left for me to shop in, and 
five to get home in." The big clock ticked mournfully when 
the rebellious voice broke a long silence. "Long o' limb, and 
full 0' vim," was the panegyric ascribed to the owner of the 
voice in an ancient high school Journal, for nearly twenty- 
four was the lengthy person, with a career before her and 
plenty of ambition back of her. 

"And you, Yoga — Just you turn around to the wall. 
You look absolutely blank with your old concentration — un- 
less you concentrate on a way to get me out of here for 
Christmas." The ^irl, sitting in front of the fire with a big 
drawing board on her knees, dumped board and pencils on 
the floor beside her and impulsively stripping off the paper, 
poked it into the fire. 

"There, old Yoga, is an offering. I might as well try 
to make doll clothes, as to try to draw this afternoon." Pick- 
ing herself up from the big chair, she faced the little plaster 
god almost angrily. At the same time she caught sight of 
her own comically long face, looking at her from the mirror, 
screwed up into a picture of woe with a laugh almost spoil- 
ing the effect. An instant she gazed, then grinning delight- 
edly, she reached down for the discarded board. 

"What a Joke on me! Of all folks in the world to have a 

Page Five 




Wi)t Collese ^vtttinqi 




face like that. I'll save it for the Small Person, she'll appre- 
ciate it." Standing in front of the mirror, with the drawing 
board supported by a knee, she began drawing swiftly — 
drawing the reflection of a face again dubiously woeful. The 
clock and the coals had possession of the silenca 

It had become so dark that it was necessary to peer 
around (as they do in dark rooms in detective stories) to lo- 
cate articles in the room. In the farthest corner from the 
fire was a grand piano belonging to the Small Person. It may 
as well be said now that she was the invaluable kindergarten 
supervisor of one of the largest schools in the city, as well as 
the most important factor of this delightful apartment. Be- 
yond the piano was an alcove used entirely for the Long Per- 
son's work. The fire glow showed glimpses of white from 
casts and canvases which seemed to be dozing oflE for the 
night. Atmosphere and inspiration belonged in there, but the 
happy thoughts and bright ideas all came from the depths of 
the big chair before the fire, according to the artist girl. 

These two girls had gone through college together. Af- 
ter graduation, one had put her talent as an illustrator to 
practical advantage, while the other had found her work 
"with the kiddies, where she had an awfully good time being 
adored," as the lengthy one condescendingly conceded. 

An impatient ring brought the knee of the sketcher 
down and the board was tucked under the table. Scarcely 
waiting to push the button that opened the front door below, 
the girl fiew out of the room and sent a boyish whistle down 
the elevator shaft. 

Evidently the Small Person was coming home. This 
was always the nicest time of the day. The big fire place 
knew all about the affairs of these happy strenuous young 
people, who with their strong faith in the joy o' life, were 
helping each other to success. The newcomer entered in the 
crook of the other girl's arm. The smaller girl, dressed in 
brown, wore a great bunch of violets. 
Page Six 




tIDfje CoUege (Greetings; 




"And who, may I ask, is the poorer by reason of these 
luscious blossoms?" The tone was utter scorn, but the eyes 
were admiration. 

"Now, Tomkin, just you never mind, but sit right down 
here and 1^11 tell you the news." 

"All right. I hope its more cheerful than mine," and 
Tomkin made a wry face at Yoga's back. 

"Why, Tomkin, what's wrong?" The Small Person was all 
concern in a minute, but Tomkin pushed her back into the 
low chair and draped herself over the back and arm of it. 

"Go ahead, child, with your narrative. Mine can wait. 
Tell us about the tall knight — for of course he was tall and 
beautiful, who gave you the violets." 

"Silly! This time he was neither tall, nor beautiful, nor 
strong. Tomkin dear, do you remember the little chap who 
sat next to Isidore Mann?" 

"Oh Izzy!" groaned Tomkin, "I remember him at least. 
Proceed — I suppose said small chap has fallen in love with 
'teacher' and has had his daddy settle an endowment on you. 
Fine! We need new curtains, Janey, and the pedal on the 
piano squeaks fiercely; and there's that tea set I ruined yes- 
terday, by gently coaxing the cups to flit to the floor by 
means of my kimona sleeve. Encourage him, Janey, by all 
means." 

"Hush! Listen to me, Jack-and-the-Beanstalk, mostly 
beanstalk, Oliver Johns is my knight's name, and his father 
is a florist; hence the flowers." Tomkin twinkled approval 
and waited for Jane to continue. "That is all very well, but 
now the other children are trying to come up to the violets, 
and if you could only see the offerings, Tomkin, my kiddies 
make me heart-sick. I doubt if there is any one of them all, 
who will have a tree, or any Christmas, besides Oliver. It 
hurt me all over when I had to tell them there would be no 
school tree this year. You ought to put them all in a book, 
Tomkin; they are fascinating. You must come out tomor- 
row for a last look. Now I've explained my violets, your 
news, please." 

Page Seven 




Wi^t CoUege ^rtttitiQi 



^^ 



Tomkin's figure became more twisted on the chair's 
arm. "Here — read this" — and she pulled forth a battered 
letter from her pocket. "Never mind taking time for Bob's 
measles or the new kitten — here." Jane read the part indi- 
cated, with a sdbering face. 

"Why, Tomkin dear — I'm sorry — why, honey, not go 
home for Christmas! I think the family might have put off 
the trip to Japan until you could go, too." 

"Just what I thought — ^but you see, mother says it is 
*now or never,' so I don't suppose I ought to say anything. 
Janey, I never wanted to do anything quite so much as I 
want to go home." 

"I know, dear, and nothing can make up for not being 
at home Christmas, but I'm almost selfish enough to be glad, 
because now you can go back with me as I have wanted you 
to all the time." 

"Go home with you to your four house parties! Now 
wouldn't all your friends be delighted! Mad rush for an- 
other man for that friend of Jane's! All taken — rush again 
— ^get anybody — end up by unearthing a student of social 
science — extremely short with light hair. Try desperately 
to be nice to John or Dick or Noel when you are busy with 
Charles or Pete or Hal or — " 'but the voice of the prophet 
looking into the future was stopped by Jane's "Hush!" and 
the pressure of a determined hand on her lips. 

Jane protested, but Tomkin was firm. Besides there was 
a new twinkle in the corners of her eyes, which no amount 
of protestation or cajoling would make her explain. 

Cash day the papers typed the shopping days in large 
letters. And while Jane was away with her "kiddies," Tom- 
kin put aside some really important unfinished drawings 
and worked with smiles and twinkles in the little studio. 
Two afternoons she put away her things early and walked 
out to the school and visited Jane, watching each child in- 
tently while taking many mental notes. When Jane hesitated 
about taking home the big record book to check up, Tomkin 
urged her to take it, saying she would help. Later, when 
Page Eight 




tlDiie College Greetings; 



Jane had been called out, Tomkin slipped into the studio 
with the big book and copied something out of it, furiously 
fast. 

Christmas came on Tuesday. Jane left for her home 
and her round of festivities the Friday before. Tomkin had 
lost all the twinkle by the time she had swallowed a lump as 
big as a hedge apple before she could tell Jane, "Merry 
Christmas, and hurry back!" When the end of the train was 
lost in its own smoke, she said irrelevantly and half aloud, 
"I wonder how many miles it is to Japan!" 

When she reached her rooms, the fire and the old clock 
were very cheerful, so she tried to be, too, until she saw the 
violets left by Jane — a second contribution from Oliver. 

The days until Christmas passed swiftly. Monday morn- 
ing came and with it a bushy fir, quite like the one in the 
fairy tale. The big living room began to look like a celebra- 
tion and the big clock gazed in round faced wonder. He al- 
most gave a sneezy tick, when Tomkin hung a branch of 
prickly pine on him. After many minutes of hard work, 
both mentally and physically, Tomkin sat down on the floor 
among the chairs and tables which were piled high, and look- 
ed around discouraged. 

"Well, Jane, you big little girl, I surely wish you were 
here. You'd know just what to do. Yoga — you'd better turn 
around here to concentrate for me — land knows I need it." 

A ring of the bell made her gasp, not because it was just 
a ring, but it was such a "hurry-up-and-let-me-come-up 
quick" sort, that she sprang up and pushed the button at the 
same time. When the elevator reached her floor, there was 
an astonished, joyous, wondering scream of "Martha!" and 
the girl who had come up in the elevator was impetuously 
carried back into the chaos of bundles and holly. The two 
girls clung to one another and it wasn't until several seconds 
that Tomkin was able to gasp, "What are you doing here? 
I thought you were to spend Christmas in Heidelberg!" 

"And what are you doing here!" shouted the other. "I 
thought you were to go to California." 

Page Nine 



Wiit CoQese Greetings; 




"Folks went to Japan — so I couldn't go. Wouldn't go 
home with Jane, but unbeknownst to her, I'm giving a party 
for her children tomorrow — invitations all out — ^you're the 
one I want if I ever wanted any one. For goodness sake, ex- 
plain yourself, you blessed old child. How on earth did you 
happen to come here?" 

By degrees the excitement allowed them to calm down a 
trifle, while Martha told how she hadn't been able to stand 
being away from home for Christmas, so had come unex- 
pectedly. She had still a matter of a hundred miles to go, 
and having several hours to wait between trains in their city, 
she had come up to the house, hardly daring to hope that she 
should find the girls still there. 

Not having seen each other since they had left college, 
where they had been roommates, there was so much to say 
that they kept up a constant chatter, Tomkin went on with 
her decorating with Martha as a willing and an apt assistant. 

By evening the place had been transformed. The tree 
was loaded with tifles which would make "Jane's children" 
think that fairies existed after all. 

That Christmas eve, the fire burned late in the grate, 
and the tall clock was once more the attentive listener. The 
two girls talked until very late — Tomkin listening hapj)ily to 
Martha's account of her work, into which she put her whole 
soul. 

"If only Jane were here! Marty, you'll just have to 
fiddle for me without the piano, for I'm longing to hear you. 
Do you remember the night of your recital at school — " and 
reminiscence poured forth until the unwelcome carriage was 
announced which was to take Martha to her train. Tomkin 
remained firm in her refusal to accompany her. She knew 
better than to urge Martha to remain over, for her own dis- 
appointment at having to spend Christmas away from home 
was too keen to wish the same for any one else. The grate 
fire had to bum very brightly indeed to make the increased 
loneliness bearable. Martha's short visit had been an "in- 
Page Ten 




tlDije CoUege ^vettinqsi 




spirational whifE" as Tomkin expressed it, and she ought to 
feel "a lot happier/' she scolded herself. 

At four-thirty Christmas afternoon there came a weak, 
hesitant ring of the bell. Tomkin went down in the elevator 
and personally escorted a group of awed little folks to the 
room. Their astonishment was both comical and pathetic. 
Others came later until the room was quite full of "Jane's 
kiddies." They all knew Tomkin, who was a frequent visitor, 
but this place and situation were quite beyond their compre- 
hension. To help break the ice, Tomkin passed big red reed 
baskets of apples and peanuts. She told two small angelic 
appearing youngsters they needn't mind getting the shells 
on the floor (and they didn't) because Miss Jane wasn't home, 
and she didn't care. The party very soon recovered its equi- 
librium. Shouts of laughter went up from pure unrestrained 
Joy- 
Before a slump could occur, Tomkin brought out an 
easel and hung several large sheets of drawing paper over it, 
chart fashion. The children she told to sit around where 
every one could see. Some were on the table, with sturdy 
legs swinging vigorously; some on the davenport, huddled 
together on its arms and even on its back. Then Tomkin 
proceeded to tell them a story. As she talked, she drew won- 
derful pictures that made the children scream with laughter. 
When the story was finished, in which even Michael Strewn- 
ski, the worst boy in the class had been absorbingly inter- 
ested, the refreshments became a renewed attraction. 

Several little girls, whom Tomkin had wisely selected to 
help serve, came in, bearing little trays containing a big dish 
of ice cream concealed under cleverly constructed Eskimo 
huts. Over the door of the hut was printed the name of 
the child; the interior was decorated according to Tomkin's 
idea of the Northlandish people. There were wonderful 
brown reindeer cookies and a supply of plain common ones 
in case some one should want to preserve the artist's animal. 
This was exactly what happened. 

Page Eleven 




Cf)c CoUcge ^xtttinQi 



At a moment when the children seemed to wish nothing 
else on earth, Tomkin pulled aside a big screen in one cor- 
ner of the room, disclosing the little tree in all its fairy splen- ^ 
dor. The surprise was the crowning victory — even brown 
reindeer were forgotten. Tomkin explained that as Santa 
Glaus was so busy, he hadn't been able to come at the last 
minute, but he had told her to go ahead. There wasn't a 
sound to break the awe, until Michael gave forth a relieved 
"Gosh! Look at th' angel flyin' on top!" and the spell was 
dissipated. Tomkin distributed the little gifts with as much 
pleasure as the youngsters took them. Some times the thanks 
were just a grateful "Aw say!" but it made her warm about 
the heart. 

"When the last little chap had shouted a rollicking 
"Merry Christmas'' up to Tomkin, who had won their hearts 
by making them feel absolutely and individually important, 
she came back into the room with the same smile of comrade- 
ship she had given Michael in leaving. 

"Wasn't it a lark. Yoga? 1 wouldn't have missed it for 
— for even Japan!" She drew in her breath sharply as she 
looked around the room with its wrecked order. "I wish 
they were here now — its lonesome — rather — without them." 
Unconsciously she was talking aloud and her voice trailed off 
with a funny sound. 

"Without — and why not keep them here?" 

With an odd light in her eyes, Tomkin impulsively 
pulled the easel with its chart of comical figures out into the 
middle of the room. Ignoring the debris of shells and tissue 
paper under her feet, she rapidly fixed her paper and began 
to draw with quick, sure strokes. Never stopping, the girl 
bent to her work. This was what she loved best. Jane's 
small boys and girls had given Tomkin a great store of ideas. 
One thing suggested another until it seemed impossible to 
stop. At last there was a contented sigh, the stooped shoul- 
ders drew themselves back, and two long arms were stretched 
high as Tomkin looked with satisfaction upon her latest 
achievement. The children as she had seen then, as she had 
Page Twelve 




tE^fje CoUege (^reetingtf 




loved them and studied them without knowing it, were re- 
produced by her skillful pencil. She had even the wondering 
explosive of Michael as he gazed at the lighted tree. 

She slid from the high stool, and giving Yoga, who once 
more faced the front, a triumphant glance, she slipped on a 
long coat. "Without stopping for the elevator, she ran down 
the two flights of stairs and out into the Christmas night. 
The same evening Jane received a message. It said simply, 
"Japan came to me today. I am writing at length. Tomkin." 

Feril Hess, '15. 




Page Thirteen 




^fje CoUese <§rcetinss« 



Faculty Committee— Miss Weaver, Miss Tanner, Miss Neville 
Editor— Lois M. Coultas 

Associate Editors— Elizabeth Tendick, Letta Irwin, Mary Lawson 
Business Managers— Elizabeth Dunbar, Emily Jane Allan, Helena 
Munson 



In our opinion one of the most pertinent criticisms, ever 
heard of the life at I. W. C, is that each student is so busy 
with the doing of things as to leave no time for the thinking 
of the significance of things. The truth in that criticism is 
worth honest consideration. Do we, in our hurried life here, 
very often take the time to think hard and clearly even over 
one of the many questions we meet daily? 

Upon each one of us is sometimes laid the necessity of 
thinking seriously of what we are accomplishing, of how 
near, in our striving, we come to reaching the ideals set for 
us in our work here, or how far we are from realizing those 
ideals. An especially appropriate time for the inward look 
is the Chiistmas time, the week or weeks just before we go 
to our homes. Can we afford for the sake of those at home, 
to return at Christmas time, untouched for the better by our 
three months here? College life does not mean, primarily, 
an increased book knowledge — it means an enrichment of 
life, through a bigger point of view, a deeper understanding, 
and a more embracing sympathy. Followed by hopes, we 
came to college last fall; going home, we should be conscious 
of a realization, even though very partial, of the hopes that 
sent us thither. 

The Christmas spirit, with its tender power, hovers over 
us; its gentle, kindly influence is everywhere, softening and 
breaking down prejudices, purifying and strengthening our 
faith. Surely is this season as suitable as the l^ew Year for 
resolutions to live better because more deeply. A reawaken- 
ing to the spiritual, if we have let our souls fall asleep, the 
quickening touch of life, if we have denied our souls their 
heritage, will attune us more closely to the wonder of the 
Christmas tide. 
Page Fourteen 



fsa^!issm:wmis^msmssm!{iiii:siM>iassmwii^^ 



Wi^t €^(iVit^t (Greetings; 



The two new societies, Theta Sigma and Lambda Alpha 
Mu, are making their first appearance in the Greetings this 
month. We are heartily glad to welcome them to our pages. 

The double number of the Greetings, coming out in De- 
cember for the last two years, will not appear this year. In 
its place, we decided to publish the regular December and 
January issues, but because of the popularity that the double 
number met with among the girls, a Christmas issue is tak- 
ing the place of the January number. 



THANKSGIVING 

Thanksgiving is a time to which both old and new stu- 
dents look forward with a great deal of pleasure, for, what- 
ever longings for home and fireside may have haunted the 
days before it, when it is ended, and when the last 
sleepy thoughts fill the mind of the tired college girl, there 
is great satisfaction for the Thanksgiving day in the college 
home. 

This year the day was begun with a corridor breakfast, 
which has, among other virtues, the virtue of being served 
an hour later, to girls in kimonas and breakfast caps. When 
the breakfast time was over, began the preparations for 
church, and after the return from church, the donning of 
the dinner gowns. At 1:30 the dinner bell called every one 
to the dining room, which had been charmingly decorated 
by the Freshmen under the guidance of Miss Jennie Ander- 
son. The color scheme was green and yellow, a combination 
of colors used, previously, by the Freshmen. Yellow candles 
and yellow shades on the burners shed a mellow light over the 
glistening tables. Guests and faculty and students joined 
in the singing of grace. 

"Thank God with life as well as lips. 

With holy prayer and fellowships, 

With holier hope and nobler aim. 

Sing praises to the Father^s name." 

Page Fifteen 




^fje CoOese (Greetings; 



^^ 



When all were seated the chatter and the dinner began, 
which satisfied the most healthy appetite as well as the most 
convivial spirit. Dr. Harker introduced Miss Weaver as 
toastmistress. The toasts had been arranged in reference to 
the opening of the campaign for the endowment fund in 
Jacksonville. Dr. Pitner responded to the toast of the "Col- 
lege and the Town." His toast showed the same generous 
love for the college which is felt on the day on which he 
opens his Fairview home to the college. Miss Weaver called 
on Miss Marshall to respond to "The College and the Gown/' 
and the response was given in a very clever and simple 
manner. Dr. Nate gave a toast to the "College and the 
Church," and Dr. Harker to the "College and the State." Dr. 
Harker had begun by saying that he was glad that he was to 
have the privilege of listening and not talking, but at the 
end of the toasts he disclosed one of his special secrets which 
he has a way of keeping until the proper moment. Mr. 
Julius Strawn, he said, had given ten thousand dollars for en- 
dowment. The announcement was heartily cheered. Then 
the party broken up, the guests returned home, the students 
and faculty to spend the evening in talking over the events 
of the day and recalling memories of other Thanksgiving 
days. 

ENDOWMENT STUNT 

The first fruits of the endowment campaign in Jackson- 
ville were realized when the generous gift of $10,000 from 
Julius Strawn was announced after the Thanksgiving dinner. 
The keynote of enthusiasm had been sounded and in such 
an atmosphere thoughts easily found expression in verse. At 
chapel Friday morning the official campaign song was intro- 
duced: 

Bring a rousing spirit, girls, to cheer the fund along; 
There's other ways than money for to help the cause along; 
A hundred eighty thousand will be coming right along — 
If we keep shouting endowment. 
Page Sixteen 




Wiit CoSege ^vtttinQS 




Chorus — 
Hurrah! hurrah! — there's nothing we can not do; 
Hurrah! hurrah! — it rests with me and you. 
"We're Woman's College daughters and to her we will be 

true — 
So we keep shouting endowment. 

See our friends responding when they hear our Prexy's call; 
Their hands go in their pockets — can't you hear the dollars 

fall? 
Everybody's working and they answer one and all, 
While we keep shouting endowment. 

Chorus — 
January, February, March, April, May and June; 
The ball has been set rolling — who will keep it on the boom? 
The final day of triumph will be on the fourth of June, 
'Cause we've kept shouting endowment. 

Chorus — 
Afterwards nine girls, each bearing a poster of one letter 
of the word endowment, marched in and gave short rousing 
talks concerning the part that we as loyal I. W. C. girls could 
do in this great undertaking. Various motions were made 
and carried and a mass meeting announced. 

All this, however, seemed a feeble demonstration in 
comparison with the one Saturday afternoon. The promised 
mass meeting had been held and many clever songs impro- 
vised, so with colors flying scores of students collected at va- 
rious places around the square and at the campaign head- 
quarters to give vent to some of their enthusiasm in songs 
and cheers. Just what will the celebration be when the full 
sixty thousand is secured in a few more days? 



LOCAL CALENDAR 

November fifteenth. — The Indiana Club made their first 
public appearance in chapel this morning. The club song 
was much appreciated by the audience. 

Page Seventeen 



Wiit CoUege (3vtttinQS 




Dr. Harker was at morning chapel for the first time 
since his illness of the past week. 

Miss Beebe's theory class was started today, with a good 
enrollment. 

November sixteenth. — Miss Anderson was "at home'' to 
the Sophomore class this afternoon. Dainty refreshments 
were served and another happy memory has been given to 
each member of the class. 

Mary Metcalf, a former I. W. C. student, has been visit- 
ing at the college for the last few days. 

November seventeenth. — In Dr. Harker's absence. Miss 
Neville conducted morning chapel, giving a most interesting 
talk on the Psalter, its history, its five divisions and the dif- 
ferent styles of the divisions. 

Y. W. C. A. meeting in the evening was conducted by 
Helen Harrison, Helen Jones and Effie McLaird. 

Nevember eighteenth. — The faculty enjoyed another of 
the Monday morning picnics. 

Miss Kidder and Anna Heist entertained the College 
Specials in the afternoon. Impromptu readings were given 
and were especially enjoyed by all. Ice cream and wafers 
were served. 

November nineteenth. — The new societies, the Theta 
Sigma and the Lambda Alpha Mu, were introduced in chapel 
by Dr. Harker. A fuller account of the societies is given 
elsewhere. 

November twentieth. — In the morning chapel especial 
mention was made by Dr. Harker of the Academy students 
who had received A's in all their studies. The students who 
had done work of this grade were Inez Pierez, Violet Taylor, 
Ruth Alexander, Esther and Mary Fowler, Helen Tooley and 
Mildred Barton. Zelma Jones made the highest record, her 
average for each study being A plus. 

November twenty-first. — Dr. Hancher arrived today. 
He is proving an invaluable assistant to Dr. Harker in the 
work for endowment. 

Page Eighteen 



tIDfje CoUege (Greetings 




November twenty-second. — Mrs. Colean's theory class 
was started today. 

Many of the happiest memories of the Senior class will 
gather around the pleasant hours that we have spent with 
Miss Neville. At a delightfully informal party this after- 
noon, given by Miss Neville, another happy memory was 
added to our store. 

Miss Tanner left to-day for Champaign to attend the 
annual state convention of teachers of English. 

Nevember twenty-third.— Phi Nu banquet. Fuller men- 
tion of it is made elsewhere. 

November twenty-fourth.— Four o'clock vesper services 
were held in Music hall. 

Dr. Josephine Milligan gave a very interesting talk in 
Y. W. on city charities. 

November twenty-fifth.— Mrs. Ward's Sunday school' 
class gave an informal party in one of the society halls. 

November twenty-sixth.— Belles Lettres gave their first 
open meeting for the Academy students. 

November twenty-seventh.— Dr. Hancher gave an inter- 
esting talk in chapel on the necessity of the students here 
being vitally concerned on the question of endowment. 

Miss Kidder left today for Chicago, where she will give 
a reading Thanksgiving day at the Chicago Training School. 
November twenty-eighth.— Thanksgiving day, holiday. 
Ten thousand dollars were given us by Mr. Julius 
Strawn for our endowment fund. 

November twenty-ninth.— A hastily planned but enthu- 
siastic endowment stunt took place in chapel this morning. A 
committee was appointed by the girls to see Mr. Strawn and 
personally thank him for his generous gift of $10,000. 

November thirtieth.— At 1:15 the student body marched 
down town, singing their endowment song and giving cheers 
for Jacksonville. The campaign in Jacksonville and Morgan 
county for endowment was started yesterday at noon. To- 
day the announcement was made that the amount already 
given was $24,380, 

Page Nineteen 



Wi)t College ^ttttinzi 




December first. — Geneva meeting in Y. "W. 

At the Elks memorial service out in town Mrs. Hart- 
mann, Miss Beebe and Miss Miller sang. 

December second. — The endowment fund from the town 
has been increased to $27,670. 

December third. — The $30,000 mark, which was reached 
this afternoon by the people of Jacksonville, was made an 
occasion of great rejoicing by the girls. 

December fourth. — $31,444 has been added to the en- 
dowment fund by the city. 

December fifth. — Miss Neville gave a talk on Social 
Conditions in the Orient at Franklin this evening. 

December sixth. — Approximately twenty-five dollars 
worth of Red Cross stamps were sold today and yesterday to 
the girls. 

December seventh. — The Y. W. bazaar. 

December eighth. — Missionary meeting at Y. "W. 

December ninth. — Miss Beebe's concert. 

December tenth. — Belles Lettres banquet. 

December eleventh. — Mass meeting of the girls. 

December twelfth. — Ask the Freshmen. Joke. 

December thirteenth. — Expression recital. 

December fourteenth. — Although the Greetings had 
gone to press before Dr. Clarke's recital had taken place, 
judging from the pleasure with which we have heard him be- 
fore, the evening was one of enjoyment and pleasure. Dr. 
Clarke read Vanity Fair. 

December fifteenth. — Subject in Y. M., The Christmas 
Joy. 

December sixteenth. — Christmas music recital. 

December seventeenth. — Practice for Christmas carols. 

December eighteenth. — Annual Christmas party. Sing- 
ing of Christmas carols to shut-ins of the town. 

Due to lack of space it has been impossible to publish 
the class elections before this. The class officers and presi- 
dents of the different classes are: Seniors — Miss Neville, 
Elysabeth Dunbar; Juniors — Miss Johnston, Mary Watson; 
Page Twenty 




Wiit CoUes^ ^Ttttin^i 




Sophomores — Miss Anderson, Mona Summers; Freshmen — 
Miss Jennie Anderson, Marie Miller; College Specials — Miss 
Kidder, Anna Heist; Fourth Year Academy — Miss McLaugh- 
lin, Inez Pierez; Third Year Academy — Miss Stephenson, 
Ednah Thompson; Second Year Academy — Miss Dudley, 
Ethelyn Wisegarver; First Year Academy — Miss Wright, 
Pauline Eives; Academy Specials — Miss Miller, Irene Mc- 
Cullough. 



SOCIETY NOTES 

For years the girls of I. W. C. have lustily sung "Belles 
Lettres and our dear Phi ISTu, What love to both we bear!" 
with single-hearted affection. But these societies, however 
beloved and efficient, could not longer supply the demands 
of the growing numbers of girls in the college. The need of 
new societies became, year by year, more apparent, until 
it was a crying necessity. Twenty girls, ambitious, en- 
ergetic, have this year stepped in to fill the breach. Ten of 
these girls, after numerous meetings, serious and secret, in 
which sober minds puzzled over constitution, motto and 
name, appeared one morning at chapel wearing the pink 
Killamey rose and a tiny bow of lavender, as an announce- 
ment of the birth of the new society. Lambda Alpha Mu. 

You have heard rumors of spreads, feasts and weird in- 
itiations in the last few weeks, and we cannot gainsay an I. 
W. C. rumor. We only ask you to wait and watch the bulle- 
tin board for further indications of the growth of our society. 
With new girls in our ranks, who are just as enthusiastic as 
the charter members, we hope soon to be able to make our 
presence known in the college life. While we seem so in- 
sistently to take our individual stand as a society, we would 
not forget the kindly suggestions from the faculty, nor the 
gracious concessions made to us by the old societies, which 
have been of such incalculable help to us during these first 
days. 

Page Twenty-one 




Wbt CoOese ({lreettng£( 




The list of officers is as follows: 

President, Mary Louise Powell. 

Vice President, Ida Perry. 

Eecording Secretary, Louise Frank. 

Corresponding Secretary, Helena Munson. 

Treasurer, Maude Collins. 

Chaplain, Hazel Kiblinger. 

Chorister, Mary Shastid. 

Critic, Euth Want. 

Sergeant-at-Arms, Jane Culmer. 

Usher, Florence Haller. 

"A higher strain" we'll sing 

As far your tributes ring. 

In true, unswerving loyalty 

We give our love to thee. 

There is but one, we claim, 

Deserving of most fame; 

Where'er we go, o'er land and sea. 

Our hearts will be with thee. 
Chorus — 

Here's to our Lambda Alpha Mu, 

Pledge we allegiance still to you — (et cetera.) 

Euth Want, '16. 

Many and varied as are our interests, there is nothing 
to which we give so intense an interest as to Theta Sigma, 
our new society. Although we are very young and undevel- 
oped, we intend doing great things right away. We do to- 
day, not tomorrow. Already we have grown from ten to 
twenty-five members. We are now ready to show our literary 
ability. We are not going to be content with only reaching 
the standard of work set by the old societies, but we intend 
after reaching that standard to keep climbing upwards. We 
want to make efficient women out of our members — women 
who can compete with the great problems of the world. To 
do this we all look with reverence upon the black, scarlet and 
gold, and we keep a tight grasp upon the reins leading to our 
Page Twenty-two 



^fit CoEege (greetings; 




ideal, our star, our motto — "To Faith Virtue and to Virtue 

Knowledge/^ 

Officers: 

President, Geneva V. Upp. 

Vice President, Mary Baldridge. 

Eecording Secretary, Grace Eoberts. 

Corresponding Secretary, Marie Johnson. 

Treasurer, Lucille White. 

Chaplain, Helen McGhee. 

Chorister, Mildred Seaman. 

Summoner, Honore Limerick. 

Librarian, Mabel Larson. 

Critic, Irene Merrill. 

Phi Ku is glad to welcome as sister societies, Theta Sig- 
ma and Lambda Alpha Mu, and hopes that her relationship 
with each society will prove as helpful and pleasant as that 
with her old sister. Belles Lettres. 

Phi ISTu hall has been transformed by a thorough house 
cleaning. The walls were redecorated and the radiators 
freshly gilded. Then new curtains were put up at shining 
windows and the floor was oiled. Also the furniture and pic- 
tures were shifted to new places, thus making a complete 
change. 

Our annual Phi Fu banquet was held at the Colonial 
Inn Saturday night, November the twenty-third. The Inn 
was charmingly decorated, adding' much to our spirit of fes- 
tivity. Yellow shaded candles threw a soft and mellow light 
over the dining room, which, as one of the guests remarked, 
resembled a flower garden when the tables were filled with 
the girls in their dainty gowns. 

The place cards were booklets in the shape of the oak 
leaf with the two Greek letters upon it. 

A truly Thanksgiving turkey dinner was served us in 
five courses, after which the toasts were given. 

It was our great good fortune to secure Miss Jennie An- 
derson as toastmistress, and most graciously did she fulfill 

Page Twenty-three 




Cf)c College (greetings 



her duty. Toasts were given by the following girls: Marie 
Miller, Freda Sidell, Helen Moore and Annette Eearick. Af- 
ter the last toast our president called upon the dean for an 
extemporaneous speech. If she was surprised, it did not de- 
tract any from the cheering and loving message she gave us. 
Then as the first strains of the Phi ISTu song sounded, 
we arose and ended our banquet by singing: 

Phi Nu, thou dear Phi Nu, 
Our love we give to thee. 
And we never will forget thee 
Till we lay us down and dee. 

On November the twenty-sixth the first Belles Lettres 
open meeting for the Academy students was given. The offi- 
cers who presided were Euth Alexander and Helen Thomas, 
who, if the Academy Belles Lettres had not been incor- 
porated in the college society, would have been president and 
corresponding secretary, respectively. A very creditable and 
interesting programme was given, the subject under discus- 
sion being the aeroplane. 

Our year book which came out about six weeks ago is 
proving even more satisfactory than we had anticipated. 

The evening of December the tenth was one long to be 
remembered by every Belles Lettres girl as the occasion of 
their annual Christmas banquet, held in their own hall, in 
accordance with their usual custom. 

Our own Miss Johnston presided as toastmistress in her 
charming and inimitable manner, and announced the various 
toasts with all sorts of clever sallies. 

"Hail, hail to our emblem, the shield which inspires 
with courage and daring to do." — Euth Alexander. 

"The link of gold that binds us fast to thee." — Mona 
Summers. 

"Ever shall we all the years through, in thought, act 
and word to Belles Lettres be true." — Emily Jayne Allen. 

"Hie vitae activae preperamus." — Louis Gates. 

INDIANA BREAKFAST 

Envy reigned in the heart of many a girl at the breakfast 
hour on December ninth, when the vacant places in the dining 
room took on a specific meaning in her mind. They meant 

Page Twenty-four 



y^ 



Cde CoUese Greetings; 




that the Indiana Club was breakfasting at the Peacock Inn. 
After sleeping till a late hour the jolly crowd assembled in 
the main hall and from there went to the Inn. The smell 
of the fragrant waffle breakfast greeted the hungry girls, but 
waffles were a minor Joy in comparison with the delight that 
the place cards occasioned. Pictures of the Indiana Club 
had been taken several weeks ago. The individual faces were 
now cut out and pasted on tiny maps of the state, on that 
section from which each person came. No name was on the 
cards, only the picture served as the guide to the right plate. 



epartmentst 



COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

Three large sized autograph photographs of Maude Pow- 
ell have been received at the college — one addressed to Dr. 
Harker and one each to Director and Associate Director 
Swarthout. Madam Powell sent these "in recognition of the 
splendid work being done at the College of Music of the 
Woman's College." It is the intention of Director Swarthout 
to secure autograph photographs from prominent artists who 
will appear from time to time in recitals at the college and 
in this way form sort of a "hall of fame" which will add 
greatly to the appearance of Music Hall. 

Mrs. Colean is directing a class in theory composed of 
pupils who are studying with her. 

One of the most inspiring and highly appreciated events 
that has taken place at the college was the vesper services 
which were given Sunday afternoon, November the twenty- 
fourth, at four o'clock. This vesper service was given by the 
musical faculty and was characteristic of the artists of which 
the College of Music is composed. The program was as fol- 
lows: 

Organ — Pilgrim's Chorus Wagner-Liszt 

Mr. D. M. Swarthout. 

"Voice — Divine Eedeemer Gounod 

Mrs. Taylor. 

Trio — Lift Thine Eyes (from Elijah) Mendelssohn 

Mrs. Hartmann, Miss Miller, Miss Beebe. 

Piano (a) To the Sea MacDowell 

(b) Chant d' amour Stojowski 

Miss Nicholson. 

Page Twenty -five 



W^t CoUege (greetings 



Voice — Ave Maria Bach-Gounod 

(With violin and organ obligato.) 
Miss Beebe. 

Violin — Andante Cantabile Tschaikowsky 

(From the Quari;et Opus II.) 
Mr. Max L. Swarthout. 

Duet — The Day Is Done Loehr 

Mrs. Hartmann, Miss Miller. 
Piano — Second Movement from Concerto in D minor. . . . 

Eubenstein 

Mr. D. M. Swarthout. 
The usual term recital was given in Music hall on the 
evening of December sixteenth. The programme will appear 
in the next issue. 

The Thursday afternoon recitals are being continued 
each week and the programmes have all been up to the stand- 
ard. 

Mrs. Hartmann and Miss Beebe will assist in the pre- 
sentation of a Christmas cantata, "The Story of Bethlehem," 
by Protherol, which the chorus choir of Grace M. E. church, 
under the direction of Director Swarthout, will give on the 
evening of December the fifteenth. A number of college stu- 
dents of the voice department are regular members of the 
choir. 

The College of Music is to be congratulated on having 
Mr. Wackerley as its electrician. Mr. Wackerley has added 
greatly to the convenience of the practice organ by installing 
an automatic oiler on the motor. He also has placed a dou- 
ble switch on the large organ, one switch which regulates the 
light for the pedals, the other the light for the tilting keys 
and key boards. 

Miss Beebe gave her recital on the evening of December 
ninth. Miss Miller of our faculty acted in the capacity of ac- 
companist. Miss Beebe gave the following programme: 

I. My Heart Ever Faithful J. S. Bach 

II. Pace, pace, mio, Dio (from La Forza del Destino). .Verdi 

III. Cavatine (Queen of Sheba) Gounod 

IV. Dichterliebe Schumann 

1. Im wunderschoenen Monat Mai. 

2. Aus meinen Thraenen. 

3. Die Eose, die Lilie, die Taube, die Sonne. 

4. Wenn ich in deine Augen seh'. 

V. Die Soldatenbraut Schumann 

VI. Vergebliches Staendchen Brahms 



Page Twenty-six 



Ciie CoUese ^reettnssf 




VII. The Captive Lalo 

VIII. Evening Ambroise Thomas 

IX. When We Two Parted C. H. H. Parry 

X. A Widow Bird Sate Mourning C. A. Lidgey 

XI. When Childher Plays H. W. Davies 

VII. The Country Lover Peel 

1. The Little Waves of Breffny. 

2. April. 

3. The Lake Isle of Innisfree. 

4. The Early Morning. 

5. Wander-thirst. 

On the afternoon of November eighteenth Mrs. Hart- 
mann appeared before the Amateur Musical Club, the most 
important woman's musical club of Chicago. She gave the 
following group of four songs: 

Psyche Paladilhe 

Crepuscule Massenet 

L'Henre Exquise Hahn 

Lieti Signor Meyerbeer 

Mrs. Hartmann was accompanied by Mrs. Junius C. 
Hoag. The following clipping from the Musical Leader tells 
of her success: "The programme concluded with a group of 
songs which certainly made evident that Mrs. Hartmann is 
a soprano of excellent training and versatile vocal qualities. 
Mrs. Junius C. Hoag accompanied the singer extremely well, 
adding to the artistic programme." We congratulate Mrs. 
Hartmann on her success and are glad to have of our fac- 
ulty one who brings us so much honor.' 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mr. Crabtree of the Farrell bank is giving a series of lec- 
tures on banking to the class in household economics. 

Sales for the endowment fund were introduced by a pie 
sale on November twenty-sixth, by the second year normal 
girls. 

December third has been set aside by the National As- 
sociation of Home Economics as a memorial day to Mrs. 
Ellen Eichards, former president of that organization, and 
head of the department of sanitary chemistry in Boston uni- 
versity. Each school having a home economics department 
is to observe the day in recognition of her valua'ble services 
to humanity. 

Page Twenty-seven 



Cije College ^vntinza 




EXPRESSION NOTES 

The Christmas bells from hill to hil 

On Thanksgiving, Miss Kidder read The Servant in the 
House at the Chicago Training School for city, home and 
foreign missions. November the twenty-ninth, at the same 
place, she read Saul. During the time that Miss Kidder was 
away she gave the reading. The Terrible Meek, before the 
Woman's Club of Benton Harbor, Michigan, and on Decem- 
ber first, The Passing of the Third Floor Back at Kalamazoo, 
on the Philanthropic Lecture Course. She gave several other 
recitals also while she was in the city. 

Miss Parsons read at the December meeting of the Pleas- 
ant Plains Woman's Club. 

The annual term end recital of the Expression depart- 
ment occurred Friday, December the thirteenth. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The Y. W. C. A. wishes publicly to thank Mr. Vail for 
his generous gift of ten dollars, the bill for the prints which 
he made for the 1913 calendars. The calendars are a success 
in every way and large numbers have been sold. 

An interesting meeting was led by Efiie McLaird, as- 
sisted by Helen Harrison and Helen Jones, on the evening of 
November the seventeenth. The subject discussed was "The 
Master Hand," with special talks on "Life as a Discord" and 
"Life as a Harmony." 

On the evening of November the twenty-fourth, we were 
indebted to Dr. Josephine Milligan of Jacksonville for a very 
instructive talk on the various chan^"ies of the city, with spe- 
cial reference to the Anti-tuberculosis League, the Tag Day 
fund, and the Associated Charities. 

A big poster on the chapel bulletin board announced the 
"Geneva" meeting for December the first. The central stu- 
dent summer conference was reported by five of the I. W. C. 
delegates in such an interesting and impressive way that sev- 
eral girls are already planning to go to Williams' Bay next 
year. 

The annual Christmas bazaar was held in society halls 
after dinner on the evening of December the seventh. The 
tables, piled high with dainty, pretty gifts, were rapidly 
cleared, and some eighty dollars poured into the Y. W. coffers. 

Page Twenty- eight 



imUUJiUllllllllllllUMIUUinHUIIIIIUIHIIUllUltllllWHMlllinillHIIIIIMnillllUlUJIUIIIUItllHllllllllHlllllllMlllin 

s 
Classy Styles We will be pleased to show you our line I 

s 

W. T. REAU6H 

Fashionable Footwear | 

For All Occasions | 

33 South Side Square Jacksonville, 111. i 



He comes — he comes — the Frost Spirit comes! You may 

trace his footsteps now 
On the naked woods and the blasted fields and the brown 

hills' withered brow. 
He has smitten the leaves of the gray old trees where their 

pleasant green came forth, 
And the winds, which follow wherever he goes, have shaken 

them down to earth. 

— Whittier. 



Otto Speith 
pboto portraiture 



Member Photographers Associaton of Illinois 



The Watson Studio Southwest Corner Square | 



uiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiuiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiutiiiiriniiniiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiH 



Like some lorn abbey now, the wood 

Stands roofless in the bitter air; 
In ruins on its floor is strewed 

The carven foliage quaint and rare, 
And homeless winds complain along 
The columned choir once thrilled with song. 

— ^Lowell. 



COTRELL & LEONARD 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS O^ 

CAPS 

GOWNS and 
HOODS 



To the American Colleges and Univer- 
sities from the Atlantic to the Pacific; 
Class contracts a specialty. 




GO TO 



Otxnie:^ 



FOR 



Our Prices Make Cleaning | 

a Necessity | 

Dry Cleaned and Pressed i 

Ladies' List | 

Skirts 50c I 

Jackets 50c I 

Waists 50c and up | 

Longcoats i.oo | 

Dresses i.oo and up f 

Sanitary Cleaning Shop | 

214 S. Sandy St, Both Phones 631 | 

We call for your goods | 



I Fresh Homemade Candies 

I Hot and Cold Sodas 

I All kinds of Fresh and 
I Salted Nuts 

I East State St. 
iimwiwiiiiiiiiHMMiiiiiKiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiHiMiiHiiiiiiniiiniMiinniiiiiiiiiuinuiiiiiiniiiMiiiiMiiiiiiniiMiHiiiiiiumiiiiiiHiiiiniiniuniiiMiiMMniHwiiii^ 



Ladies' Fine Furs 
E. JENKIN 

15 West Side Square 



imiiHiHiiMiiiimiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiiMitiiiiiiimiMiMiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiniiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiMiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiM 



Dr. Albyn Lincoln Adams | 

Oculist and Aurist I 

to the State School for the Blind | 

323 West State Street | 



DR. KOPPERL/ 

Dentist 



326 West state St. 



Practice limited to diseases of the 
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 



There's nought desired and nought required save a sleep. 
I rock the cradle of the earth, I dull her with a sigh, 
And know that she will wake to mirth by and by. 

— C. Rossetti. 



Dr. R. R. BUCKTHORPK 

Dentist 

111. Phone, House 1054 

Office 750 
Bell Phone, Office 512 
Over Hatch Drug Store 

Jacksonville, 111. 



DR. BYRON S. GAILE^Y 

EYE 
EAR 
NOSE 
THROAT 

340 West State Street 



Th<? Colled|<? Girl I 

The Summer winds were kind to you | 
And left your face an Indian hue | 

But when your school work you plan | 
Of course you want to lose your tan, I 
So use VARA Greaseless Cream | 

25 cents the jar. | 

Armstrong's Drug Store S. W. Cor- | 

ner Square. I 



DR. CARL ^. BLACK 

Office— 349 E. State St. 
Both Phones 85 
Residence 1305 West State St. 

Both Phones 285 

Surgery — Passavant Memorial Hospital 

and Our Saviours Hospital 

Hospital Hours — 9:00 a. m. to 12 m. 

Office Hours — 1:30 to 4 p. m. Even- 
ings and Sundays by appointment 



mMmnniiiHimiiimniiiiiiniiiiHiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiniiiiiMiiiiiiiiMiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiimiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiii^ 



SWiiiiHiiiiniininimmiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiinniiiiiiiiiiiniiiMiiitiMiiiiiiiiHiiiiiHiiiiniiiiHniiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiMiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiinMiMiniiniiiimmimiie 

I It is our business to get new goods for you | 

I We are never fully satisfied with our stock, but keep con- I 

I stantly adding to it in order that no customer's needs may be over- § 

I looked. Besides we believe it our duty to be forever watchful of | 

I the markets and so secure "EVERYTHING" and "THE BKST" \ 

I We do not depend on onlyone line to make a profit — hence | 

I can sell cheaper* | 

I A complete line of Drugfs and Groceries | 

jphonesSOO K^QIBElKyTS BI^OS. Phone. 80o| 

i Open every working day and night. | 

I 29 South Side Sq. | 



-a 



The thin gray cloud is spread on high, 
It covers but not hides the sky. 
The moon is behind, and at the full; 
And yet she looks both small and dull. 

— Coleridge. 



A Womdn's Store 

rilled wltti the Luxuries and Necessities which appeal | 
to the heart of every.„woman 



Advanced Styles at 
Moderate Prices 



We take a pride in proclaiming- that we have the 
lightest, brightest store in the State of Illinois, filled by 
a rapidly changing- stock of attractive merchandise, and 
catering ever to the wants of young women. 

Coats Suits Dresses Costumes 

Waists Gloves Hosiery Jewelry 

Laces Ribbons Corsets Neckwear 

L/inens Notions Art Goods Handkerchiefs 



l^^\ 



i LADIES* AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. 

3 
^llllirillllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 



iiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiniiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiniiiiiiiniiiiiMiiiiiinnniiiiiiiiiiiinitiiiiiiiiiiiiiMHiiiniiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiMiniiitiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiis 



GEO. T. DOUGLAS 
Fancy Groceries 



234 West State St. 



738 East North St. 



In December ring 

Every day the chimes; 
Loud the gleemen sing 

In the streets their merry rhymes — 
Let us by the fire, 
Ever higher, 
Sing them till the night expire. 

— Longfellow. 




BROTHER 

Jacksonville's Largest Mens' Store 
Pennants and Banners 

I. W. C. and Fraternity special designs 

Mannish Cut Sweater Coats 

Hand Bags, Trunks 

and Suits Cases 



GIRLS 

Our Biby Minnette Photo 
is just the thing 
you are looking for 
Call and see 

McDougall 

The West State Street 
Photogradher 



PACIFIC 

Jacksonville's Best and most 
Popular 

HOTEL 

The Home of the Traveling Man 
Jno. B. Snell, Prop. 
Rates I2.25, $2.50, and $3.00 per day 
One Block West of Womans College 
Opposite Post Office 
Rooms with or without bath 
Local and Long Distance Telephone 

in every room. 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



niHiniiiuiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiii MiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiff 



£!HIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII|lllllllllllllllllllllllinillllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII|lllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllMlllllllllllllllllllllinilllllll 

X 

3 

I 

I SKIRT BOXES 

I ROCKERS, SCREENS, DESKS 

I AND BED ROOM CURTAINS 

5 

I AT 

IJohnson, Hackett & Guthriel 



The time draws near the birth of Christ; 
The moon is hid, the night is still, 
The Christmas bells from hill to hill 
Answer each other in the mist. 
The earth lies fast asleep, grown tired of all that's high or 
deep; 



I KODAK FINISHING 

a 
c 

iVulcan Roll Films 

3 

I Cameras from $2.00 up 

lEverything" strictly first class 

s 

X 

I Claude B. Vail 

lOswald's Drug Store 71 E. Side Sq. 



SFrank Elliott, Pres. Wm. R. Routt, Vice-Pres. 

3 C. A. Johnson, Vice-Pres. 

I J. Weir Elliott, Cashier 

5 J. Allerton Palmer, Asst, Cashier 



lELIylOTT STATE BANK 

E 
E 

I Jacksonville, 111, 



Capital 
Undivided Profits 

Frank Elliott 
J. Weir Elliott 
Wm. R. Routt 
Wm. S. EUoitt 



$150,000 
- I 15,000 

Frank R. Elliott 
John A. Bellatti 
C. A. Johnson 



Piepenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 



HERE TO PLEASE 



Candies 
Cookies 
Sandwiches 
Groceries 



Cakes 

Pies 

Pop on Ice 

California Fruits 



School Supplies 



Girls 

Don't forget our Advertisers 



iiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiimiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiiiMiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiMiin^ 



uuiuiiiiiiiiiiHiiMUiiiiiiniiinintniiniiiiiiuiiiniiiuiiiinuiuuitiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuimiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiciiiiMiMiiiiiiiuMiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiuuimnuiinuiinn 

S 

The bride s first choice for the home? | 

House Furnishings of Quality | 

from the I 

ANDRE & ANDRE I 

3 

Our Special Room Furnishings will interest every student I 



These days are short, but now the nights, 

Intense and long, hang out their utmost lights; 

Such starry nights are long, yet not too long; 

Frost nips the weak, while strengthening still the strong 

Against that day when spring sets all to rights. 

— C. Rossetti. 



KOFFMAN'S 

Lunch Room 

opposite Depots 

609-611 East State Street 

Jacksonville, 111. 



Len G. Magill 
Printer 

East State Street 111. Phone 418 



Montgomery & Deppe 

EivERYTHING IN DrY GoODS 

Well Lighted First Floor Cloak and Suit Room 

Agents for the Ladies Home Journal Patterns 
The new "Howd" front laced corsets 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiHiiuiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiuiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniMiMiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiHiiiMiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiHiiiiniiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiii 



:<iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiMiiiimiiiii[iiiiiiininiitiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iimiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiHiniiiiuHiUHiiiuii 




FALL Footivear 

OUR SPECIALTY 

Dress Slippers 
Street Shoes 
5?droom Slippers 

We Repair Shoes 



I am winter that do keep 
Longing safe amidst of sleep. 
Who shall say if I were dead 
What should be remembered? 



— Morris, 



H. J. & h. M. SMITH 

Fancy Bazaar 
and Millinery 

211 West state Street 



TAYLOR'S 



Grocery 

A good place to trade 



221 West State Street 



Illinois Phone 419 Bell Phone 417 

A. L. Bromley 

Ladies' Tailor 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and 
Repairing. Ladies' Man Tail- 
ored Suits to order. Remodeling 
of all kinds. Special rates to 
I. W. C. students. All work 
called for and delivered promptly 



7miiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiii 



GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiniiHiimiHiiin 



HttmiuHuiiiiituiiiHiiiiiiiinMiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiMiin 

s 

I 

College Jewelrv | 

Engraved Cards and Invitations j 

Chafing Disi^es, Copper and Brass Goods | 

Special Die Stationery I 

21 South Side Square | 



Ah! bitter chill it was! 

The owl, for all his feathers, was a-cold; 
The hare limped trembling through the frozen grass. 

And silent was the flock in woolly fold. 

— Keats. 




JaCKSONV/LI^, fULt 

Established 1890 



Low Prices Square Dealing 
Keep us busy 



111. Phone 57 Bell Phone 92 

Fresh Drugs, 
Fancy Goods 
Stationery 

THE 

Badfler Drug Store 

2 doors West of Postoffice 
235 E. State Street 

ItliniUIIUUIUUHUUlUUIIUIIUUUIIIIIIIIUIIUIUIIilllUIUIIiUIIIUUIIIIIIIIUIIIUIIIIIUIIIIII 



Florence Kirk King 
Hair Dresser 

Now prepared to manufact- 
ure French hair and combings 
into the 1912-1913 styles. 

Shampooing and scalp mas- 
sage by appointment at your 
residence. 

Illinois Phone 837 
Residence 503 West College Street 



If only you'll i 

Remember Cherry's j 

We'll be pleased, and we I 

know positively that you'll | 

find no cause for complaint. | 

Our horses are safe; our equi- I 

pages have character and in- | 

dividuality, and our prices are i 

most reasonable. i 

Cherry s Livery ! 

Both Phones Jacksonville, 111. i 
lUiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiitiiiiiimiiiiiiuiiimiiiiHiiiimniiiUi^ 



^iiuimnuiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiniHniMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiiiiiiriHiiiiiniiMiiinininiiim 

s 

I It will pay you to visit 

I SCHRAM'S 

I Jewelry Store 



The wintry west extends his blast, 
And hail and rain does blow; 

Or the stormy north sends driving forth 
The blinding sleet and snow. 



— Burns. 



iFancy Articles Christmas Goods 

I COOVKR & SHREVE^'S 
I Drug Store 



Kodaks and Supplies 

Developing and Finishing 



I Dorwari Market 

1 AI.L KINDS OF FRESH and 
j SALT MEATS. FISH, 
I POUI.TRY, ETC. 

I Both Phones 196 230 W. State St. 



COOK 

LIGHT with GAS 
HEAT 

Jacksonville Railway & 
Light Company 

224 South Main Street 



Ask your grocer for 

HOLSUM 

BREAD 

Made Clean. Delivered clean 
in waxed paper wrappers 



'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiminiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiniiiMiiiiiiiMiiiimiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiHn 



iiiiniiiiiiiMimimMiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiuiiiiMiiiiniMiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuniiiiiHiiiHiniiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMMiMiMiiiiHiiiiiiiMMiiiiHiiiiiiniiiiiiiM 



Cafe 



Confectionary 1 



(beacock ITnn 



Catering- 



Soda 



Candies 



November chill blows loud wi" angry sough; 

The short'ning winter-day is near a close; 
The miry beasts retreating frae the plough; 

The blackening trains o' crows to their repose. 

— Burns. 



Oswald's 

Drug Store 

71 East Side Sq. 

TOIIvET ARTICI.es 

PERFUMES 
FINE STATIONERY 



I<adies' High Grade, Late Style 
FUR SCARFS and MUFFS 

ARE SGI^D BY 

Frank Byrns 

Most Reasonable Prices 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Stbam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 East State St. Jacksonville, 111. 

Illinois Phone 388 



Pictorial Review Patterns 

For Sale at 



* ^ PRYGOODS STOREI ^ 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



uiiHiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinitiiiiiiiuiiiiiniiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiniiMiiiinnniiHuiiiiiiiiitiiiiniiiiiinininiiniiiiiiHiuiiiiiuiiiiuminiH 

I For those who discriminate 

I We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to 

I please the students who come to our city. We select only the 

I best materials and prepare them with skilfuU loving care. 

I Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and 

I Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. 

I Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all 

I College functions. 

Vickery 3e Merrigan 

I CATERERS 

I 227 West State Street 



I sift the snow on the mountains below 
And their great pines groan aghast, 

And all night long 'tis my pillow white, 
While I sleep in the arms of the blast. 



-Shelley. 



Hillerby's 

Dry Goods Store 

Safest Place 
to Trade 



C.S.MARTIN 

Fine Pictures — Artistic Framing 

Frames and Ovals of all 

descriptions and sizes 

Imported and Domestic 
Wall Paper 

314 W. State St., Scott Block 

Jacksonville, 111. 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiii tiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimii iiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiimunrmiiiiiniiiniin 



The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital . . . $200,000 
Surplus . . 32,000 

Deposits . . . 1,100,000 

U. S. Depository for Postal Saving Bank 

Julius E. Strawn, President 
Miller Weir, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear 

H. J. Rogers, A. A. Curry 

C. B. Graff 



Brady Brothers 

Hardware, Cutlery 
Paints 



«MIIIIIIIHIHIIIIIIMnilllllimiltlUIMMIIIIIIinilllllllllllHIIIIMIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMtnilUllllllliniMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIMMIIIHIIIIIIIIMIlmillHK 

The most dainty things in Rings and Jewelry. i 

New and handsome styles of goods in Sterling Silver I 

Highest grades of Cut Glass, and every | 

description of Spectacles and Eye Glasses I 

Fine Diamonds a Specialty I 

at I 

RUSSE^IvL & LYON'S I 

West Side Square | 

Both Phones 96 | 



Announced by all the trumpets of the sky 
Arrives the snow and driving o'er the fields 
Seems nowhere to alight; the whited air 
Hides hills and woods, the river and the heaven, 
And veils the farmhouse at the garden's end, 

— Emerson. 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe say 

We can furnish your 

Shoes and Party Slippers 

in the popular styles, 

leathers, and 

fabrics 



F. e;. Farrell E. E. Crabtree 

Established 1864 

P. G. FARRELL & CO. | 

BANKERS I 



Successors to First National Bank 
Jacksonville, 111. 




mw 




ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 



iiiHiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiniiiiiK: 



|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiimiiiimiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiimmiiiimiiii iiiii iiiimHiiimiiiii iiiiiiiiimiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiimmmuimimiiiiuiHiiiiiinimiitBuin 

! J. A. OBERMEYER HARRY P. OBERMEYER 



I CITY DRUG AND BOOK STORE 

I 

s 

I Stationery, Pennants, Novelties, Drugs and 

j TOILE)T REQUISITES 

3 
I 

I Quality Counts— We Count 

I Phones: Illinois 572, Bell 457 Corner South Main St: and Square 



The eternal surge 
Of time and tide rolls on and bears afar 
Our bubbles. As the old burst, new emerge 
Lashed from the foam of ages, while the graves 
Of empires heave but like some passing waves 



— Byron. 



IHARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO, 

I Designs, Cut Flowers, 
I Plants 



Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

Greenhouses, Bell 775 



THE SATISFACTION 
we enjoy through selling you 

OUR FINE SHOES 

is equaled only by 

YOUR SATISFACTION 

in wearing them 

Evening Slippers 

J as. McGinnis & Co- 

62 East Side Square 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING 

for the latest in Suits, Ladies' Underwear, Ribbons 

Laces, E)mbroidery Materials or Notions 

Visit the store that carries the 

up-to-date merchandise 

F=HEL.F=»© & OSBOFRNE 



iiiiiiiraiiiiiinniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiiHiimiiiiimiHiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiMi iiiiiiimiiiiimiiiiiiiHiimiHiiiiiiimiiimiiiiiiiirmiiiiiiiimiiiinKBW 




Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1850 



Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



LLINOI«! WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

College of Liberal Arts | 

(Full classical and scientific courses) i 

College ot Music I 

School of Fine Arts | 

School of Expression i 

School of Home Economics | 

^A Standard College — one of the best. 

Regular college and academy courses j 

leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- I 

inently a Christian college with every | 
facility for thorough work. Located - | 

in the Middle West, in a beautiful, I 

dignified, old college town, noted for | 

its literary and music atmosphere. j 

Let us have names of your friends j 

who are looking for a good college. | 

Call or address, Registrar | 

Illinois Woman's College, j 
Jacksonville, 111. 




iiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiitiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiH 



£!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiii iiiiiiiiii I iiiiiiiiiiii I iiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinm iiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiii imiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimi i iii iiiiiiiih 

J. I^. ^i^o^^^vrx 

I SHE)E)T MUSIC, MUSIC MERCHANDISE 

I TALKING MACHINES, RECORDS 

! AND SUPPLIES 



19 SOUTH SIDE PUBIvIC SQUARE 



That God, which ever lives and loves; 
One God, one law, one element, 
And one far-off divine event 

To which the whole creation moves 



— Tennyson. 



Ayers National Bank 



Capital 
5^200,000 

Surplus 
^?0,000 

Deposits 
5^1,000,000 

FOUNDED 1852 




The combined capi' 
tal and surplus of this 
bank is 

One Quarter 
Million 
Dollars 

the largest of any bank 
in Morgan County. 

UNITED STATES 
DEPOSITORY 



OFFICERS 
M. F. Dunlap, President O. F. Buffe, Cashier 

Andrew Russel, Vice President R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashier 

R. M. Hockenhull, Vice President H. C. Clement, Asst. Cashier 

C. G. Rutledge, Vice President 

DIRECTORS 

George Deitrick Harry M. Capps 
R. M. Hockenhull O. F. Buffe 
M. F. Dunlap Andrew Russel 

liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii IIIIIIIIIII HUM iiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiihiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiin iiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiihiiiiimiiiiim 



Owen P. Thompson 
Edward F. Goltra 
John W. Leach 



Cije CoUege <3vtttinq,& 

€| The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 
€j| Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month. 

€j| Subscriptions, |i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies 15c. 
fjf Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 



Contents 

After the Holidays 3 

The Awakening 4 

Betty Plays Cinderella 6 

Precocious Cockney 10 

A Worthy Effort 1 1 

Lost: A Bird Dog 13 

Lincoln's Address and Letters - 15 

All in Preparation 16 

Chaucer Class ^7 

Editorial i9 

Departments 21 

Society Notes ... 23 

Alumnae Notes 27 




Whatc'cr you dream, with doubt possessed, 
Keep, keep it snug within your breast, 
And lay you down and take your rest; 
Forget in sleep the doubt and pain, 
And when you wake, to work again. 
The wind it blows, the vessel goes 
A»d where and whither, no one knows. 



'Twill all be well: no need of care; 
Though how it will, and when, and where, 
We cannot sec, and can't declare.:^ 
In spite of dreams, in spite of thought, 
'Tis not in vain, and not for nought. 
The wind it blows, the ship it goes, 
Though where and whither, no one knows. 

Arthur Hugh Clough 






XLhcCollCQC(3vcctinQ$> 



Vol. XVI Jacksonville, 111., February, 1913 No. 5 



I 



AFTER THE HOLIDAYS 

Heart failure and waves of homesickness couldn't begin 
to express the sensations I felt when I entered the old hall 
after Christmas vacation. These uncomfortable feelings had 
commenced early in the morning. My train from home was 
three hours late, thus prolonging the teary partings. Travel- 
ing alone didn't revive my spirits much, although when I 
reached Decatur they arose enough to enable me to greet 
some of the girls with a half-hearted smile. So truly does 
misery love company, that my gloom was partly dispelled un- 
til we pulled into Jacksonville. Even then for a while the 
blue shadows did not hang too low for endurance. When 
the train stopped at the junction for mail bags, a few of us 
violated rules by clambering ojff the rear of the coach. Our 
feeling of triumph at saving cab fare was, however, soon dam- 
pened. Heavy suit cases, darkness, and poor walks, combined 
with the sudden remembrance of my umbrella left on the 
train, did not render the short walk to the college any too 
cheerful. 

As my companions were of kindred moods, our silence 
was broken only by an occasional, "Oh, girls — this time last 
night," or "Just think of those exams coming" — moans that 
were invariably followed by sympathetic groans from the rest. 

We stumbled up the steps and reluctantly opened the 
door. The few that had returned were down at dinner. 
Everything seemed to stare at us, daring us to remember the 
last time we saw them and how we felt then. 

Unable to stand the strain, we fled from the silent hall, 
the desolation of which was only emphasized by the monoto- 
nous ticking of the big clock. If we hoped to find cheer in 
the corridors above, we were soon to hope instead that we 

Page Three 




^f)t CoUese Greetings: 



could endure the lonesomeness. Only gas Jets, turned low, 
flared at intervals down the long halls. In every corner 
lurked shadows. Here and there stood a trunk. Very rare 
were the lighted rooms, showing how few, as yet, were our 
fellow sufferers. All the "sinky," "gone" feelings of the 
morning swept over me with the force of a spring freshet. I 
longed to drop down in a dark spot, to stare into space, if 
possible, to stop thinking. My forlorn unhappiness admitted 
no consolation, I wanted neither to speak, nor to be spoken 
to. When I went dispiritedly to my room, it appeared bare 
and glaring enough in the unshaded light. Glancing at our 
desks, devoid of books and pictures, I wondered when my 
roommate would arrive. The curtainless windows caught my 
sight; with a groan, I let my suit case drop from my careless 
hand. By slow degrees I saw each article; then my eyes trav- 
eled back to the coverless bed. A feeling of comfort crept 
over me. There I should find relief, but first a clean hand- 
kerchief was necessary. Turning to get one from my purse, I 
caught sight of myself in the mirror. Purse, handkerchief 
and all fell to the floor. My appreciation of the ridiculous, 
which has saved me more than once, did not fail then. My 
collar was soiled and crooked, my coat dusty and creased, 
my hat on one side flourished a feather at a rakish angle, my 
hair stringing in all directions, a smudge across my cheek, 
and above all, the most woebegone expression on my face. 
With a funny noise that had intended to be a sob and that 
really ended in a laugh, I pinned up my hair, powdered my 
nose and- went to hunt the girls. Freda Sidell, '15. 



THE AWAKENING 

The train was steaming into the Wabash station. As if 
in a dream, I had heard the conductor sing out, "Jackson- 
ville!" above the din of the moving car. I hastened to col- 
lect my belongings. While my friend was urging me to 
hurry, I dragged out my rubbers from under the seat and 
put them on; my highly elevating "Eed Book" I rescued 
Page Four 



ffl 



Wi^t CoHese ^reettnss^ 




from the aisle, down which a fat, placid-faced old man, puff- 
ing from the exertion of having extricated himself from the 
seat, was making his way; my hand-bag was resting in ease 
on the seat opposite me. That anything should be within 
easy reach struck me forcibly afterwards, although at the 
time I accepted it as a matter of course. Upon seeing how it 
was snowing out of doors, I thought of my umbrella. I pulled, 
tugged and wrenched until I loosened it from its lodging be- 
tween the seat and the side of the car. The train stopped 
with an obliging lurch which tumbled my muff from th« 
rack down on my head. 

My friend started toward the door. Very leisurely tak- 
ing my time and feeling exactly as if I were unconsciously 
rehearsing a well known role in a play, I followed. When 
she was about a third of the length of the car ahead of me, 
I inquired: 

"My dear, did you bring back your pink silk hose and 
that patent can-opener?" in a far-away voice that caused her 
to turn around and exclaim: 

"What is the matter with you? Are you crazy? For 
pity's sake, get your suit case." 

Meekly I returned to the seat to pick up my suit case, 
at the same time wondering what made Sara so cross. 

Having rapidly gained the steps, I was helped down in 
an unceremonious hustle by the brakeman, who said to a by- 
stander: 

"These college girls are slower than the C. and A." I 
took the time to glance reproachfully at him before allowing 
the passengers to get on. 

As we started toward the school, I smiled absent-mind- 
edly at the girls whom I saw standing here and there in little 
groups. Sara, who had been kissing and embracing them all, 
said: 

"You act so queer, child. Why don't you at least appear 
to be glad to see people again?" 

"I don't seem to see them, I feel as queer as I act. I 
feel just as if I were in a dream." 

Page Five 



Wi^t College ^vntingi 




"Well;' you must get over that. Christmas vacation is 
past, and with it the dreams/' she retorted. 

After many a stopping and shifting of suit cases from 
hand to hand, we reached the college. Everything looked 
vaguely familiar, yet I persisted in feeling that in a short 
time I should awake and find myself in my own bed at home, 
with a busy day of festivity before me. 

Greeting people on the way, we went to our room. Then 
we set to work, as silently as two ghosts, unpacking and re- 
packing into closets and drawers. This done, the pennants 
and pictures were to be suspended from the moulding, for, in 
daze, I did remember that the placing of tacks and pins in 
the walls was not encouraged. Then came the all important 
question of the arrangement of the furniture, usually involv- 
ing much discussion as to whether the tea table should be in 
front of the radiator or in a comer, the dresser facing the 
north or the south, the desks set straight against the walls 
or at coquettish angles with the windows. This time, how- 
ever, it was different. Sara had things all her own way. She 
began looking at me strangely, as if wondering whether or 
not to call the nurse. 

We had succeeded in getting paths made through the 
chaos, so that by careful selection of routes we could go to 
several parts of of the room, when suddenly the dinner gong 
sounded. I involuntarily cleared the space between me and 
the door in a single leap. As I stood with my hand on the 
knob, a sullen stupor seemed to fall from me, like a cloak. In 
an instant the eighth of January had become to me a reality. 

Celia Cathcart, '15. 



BETTY PLAYS CINDERELLA 

"Tom, what am I ever going to do ?" Pretty Mrs. Wilton 
turned to face her husband as she finished reading the note 
that had just come. "Here is a note from Edith Russell, and 
Page Six 




Wi}t CoUege ^vettitiQH 




she's leaving tonight, just has to go, because her sister is sick, 
or something, and — Tom, can't you say anything?" 

As Tom's struggle with his collar wouldn't permit much 
sympathy, Mrs. Wilton continued: ''Now my party will be 
a complete failure, for I counted on Edith to keep things go- 
ing, and, Tom, there's a man too many!" 

"There, there, never mind, dear — you know any thing 
you give couldn't be a failure." 

Mrs. Wilton was too new to the art of entertaining in a 
home of her own to share her husband's confidence in her 
powers as hostess. She hurried on, unassured: "Edith might 
have waited. I don't care, Tom, if her sister is sick — and Mr. 
Pierce is coming, and so much depends on his liking us, and 
if my party is all wrong, he won't. Then you'll not get that 
new offer and we can't have that little duck of a cottage we 
want, and — whatever shall I do with that extra man?" 

"Well, by George, Florence, if an extra man's all that's 
bothering you," and Tom stopped in his march back and 
forth across the room to look down at his dainty wife whose 
eyes were beginning to look suspiciously moist, "Why don't 
you bring in Betty — she'll fill in the extra place." 

"The idea, Tom! Wliy she's as awkward as anything, 
and so homely, even if she is your sister; and she's only four- 
teen. She'd be sure to make a bobble of everything." 

"Doesn't she know how to eat? Well, then, dress her 
up, and tell her not to talk. It's either that or an extra man." 

Tom went down stairs, whistling. Problems of this sort 
were out of his sphere and, anywaj^, an extra man didn't mat- 
ter. He shared Florence's eager desire to please this new Mr. 
Pierce, and thus perchance get the new offer, but he had an 
absolute confidence that his wife lacked wholly in her ability 
to rise to any emergency. - 

Mrs. Wilton, left to herself, tearfully looked ])eyond the 
note, out of the window. Across the lawn came Betty, her 
mouth open in her eager concentration on the tennis ball that 
she was bouncing from her racket. With a sigh at the utter 

Page Seven 




tKfje CoUege ^reetingsf 



hopelessness of Tom's suggestion, and yet grasping it as a last 
resort, Mrs. Wilton called: "Betty, put up your racket and 
come up to my room at once — and hurry!" 

Betty did look a bit hopeless as she dropped down by tht? 
window. Her hair, where it had worked loose from the half- 
untied ribbon, straggled around her face, while across the side 
of her skirt was a great grass stain that gave evidence of a 
recent battle on the court. 

"What'd you want, sis? I've been having the bulliest 
time; beat Billie two sets! And I've got the swellest new 
serve! I'll teach — " 

"Elizabeth Farwell Wilton, will you wait just one min 
ute, while I talk to you seriously? No, I won't tell you, 
either, until I see if you'll possibly do — and I doubt it," Flor- 
ence mused to herself with a frown, as she began pulling out 
this and that bit of finery, each to be surveyed as a possible 
accessory to Betty's toilet. 

Three-quarters of an hour later a dainty, captivating 
Betty came into the library and curtsied to Tom. 

"By Jove, it is Betty! You're a wonder, sis." 

"Oh, huh — Florence did it," Betty nodded her dark 
head with its grown up coiffure as she glanced down approv- 
ingly at the dainty slippers that peeped beneath the hem of 
Florence's latest party gown. Betty's pug nose and freckles 
added a touch of piquancy to the laughter in her dark eyes. 
"Ain't I perfect?" 

Betty was parading back and forth for Tom's inspection, 
when Mrs. Wilton hurried in to whisper to her that she must 
say as little as possible, and "0, Betty, do be careful, for so 
much depends on your behaving, and , for goodness sake, 
don't back into your train!" 

With a touch of pride, for Betty was very good to look 
at, Florence turned to introduce to the first of the guests, 
"Tom's sister. Miss Wilton." Tom himself took his sister in 
charge, answering as many of the questions addressed to 
Betty as his prerogative as big brother would allow. 
Page Eight 



Wi)t CoUcge Greetings: 



^^ 



When Mrs. Wilton saw Betty safely seated at dinner be- 
tween a confirmed old bachelor and a quiet, thoughtful man 
of the town — quite the least desirable of all the company — 
she turned her attention to her guests with her responsibility 
over. Betty slipped temporarily to the background. Betty 
had been allotted the quiet partner because there, according 
to Florence's diplomatic view, she would be safe in having 
little conversation addressed to her. Florence, however, had 
forgotten that the bachelor's one hobby was tennis. 

After Betty had directed her first remark to her right 
hand neighbor, "Do you play tennis, Mr. Lindsay?" she and 
he became capital friends. The discussion that followed 
proved so fascinating, so all absorbing that Mr. Pierce, at- 
tracted by Betty's animated, skillful use of tennis terms, 
leaned across the table to say, "You seem — ah — very fond of 
— ah— out-door sports, Miss Wilton." 

"Me?" answered Betty. "Well, I rather guess! I could 
beat you a race across the back lot any day." 

Florence gave a horrified gasp and straightway relin- 
quished all hope of the longed-for cottage; but Betty showed 
a glimpse of her coming generalship when she laughed and 
winked across the table at the august Mr. Pierce. 

"Well, well, a most extraordinary young person, certainly 
most attractive," Mr. Pierce murmured to his neighbor, as 
he looked inquiringly across at Betty, who, not daring to 
meet Florence's eye, now sat absently watching her hands as 
she clasped them under the table. Would Florence ever for- 
give her? She had meant to be so grown up, and to top it 
all she had winked, actually winked, at Mr. Pierce. Why she 
did, she could not have told, but done it she had, and now! 

After Betty had subsided completely Florence had hopes 
of Mr. Pierce's forgiving her harum-scarum sister, until dur- 
ing the evening, she heard repeated chuckles from the corner 
where the guest of honor was so delightedly listening to 
Betty. Florence trembled to think what the girl might be 
saying. By the end of an evening that seemed endless to 

Page Nine 



ta^ift CoDege (^reetingsf 



Florence, the cottage had vanished beyond the shadow of a 
doubt. 

After the last of the guests had gone, Betty carefully 
adjusted her train to fall at the prettiest angle as she turned 
on the stairs to call down to Florence: "Don't you suppost 
mother will let me have my new dresses made with trains?" 
thereby declaring her willingness to relinquish all her tom- 
boy ways just to be always "Miss Wilton," to go to lovely par- 
ties with beautiful clothes and have every one dance atten- 
tion, 

"I hope I'll never have to go through another such even- 
ing!" gasped Mrs. Wilton, sinking down on the hall seat as 
Betty disappeared. "But, Tom, did you hear what Mr. Pierce 
said about Betty — that she was a regular tonic, so different, 
so vivacious! And Mrs. Pierce has invited us over for dinner 
Thursday — she's so sorry Miss Wilton is leaving in the morn- 
ing! And, Tom, let's have the cottage painted white with 
the library done in green with those adorable curtains I was 
telling you about. Tom," Mrs. Wilton stopped in her cottage 
plans to say, "wasn't Betty glorious?" 

Louise Gates. 



PRECOCIOUS COCKNEY 

"S'ye, Mrs. 'Enderson, ow old is that by'e? 

Mrs. Henderson looked inquiringly at the surly-headed 
Cockney milk boy. 

"^Yhy Charles is four and a half, Oliver," she said, with 
a twinkle of anticipation, for the arrival of Oliver always an- 
nounced by the anxious question, " 'As the h'ice man been 
here yet?" meant an interesting moment's conversation. 

"W'y, Mrs. 'Enderson, that by'e ought to beh'in school," 
and there was concern both in the tone and in the comical 
blue eyes. 

"But, Oliver," protested the little woman, "we don't 
send our children to school in this country until they are six 
Page Ten 



MiBBiiiiiiaaMBiiaHi—i— Bi 




^^ 



years old. Don't you think four and a half is too young to 
take a baby away from his mother?" 

"By'by, nothin" " sputtered Oliver sorrowfully, "that 
by'e's goin' to do great things, Mrs. 'Enderson, 'ee h'ought to 
be put h'in school; 'ees h'awful smart and it's a burnin' shime 
to keep 'im out. Wy, Mrs. 'Enderson, I was h'all through 
school when h'i was eleven, an' drivin' a milk wy'gon." 

Feril Hess, '15. 



A WORTHY EFFORT 

As the door closed behind the departing friends and rela- 
tives I tried to think of something interesting to say to my 
young guest. My anxiety, however, was needless. 

"WTiat's your name?" came abruptly from the sturdy lit- 
tle figure before the fireplace. 

"My name? \'^Tiy, it's Mary," I returned, surprised and 
amused at the inquiry. "What's yours?" 

"Billy Davis," was the prompt answer. 

"Well, William, where do you live?" I continued, follow- 
ing up this series of questions and answers. 

"My name's Billy, not William," stoutly replied the boy 
of five. 

"All right. Bill," for his tone implied there was little for 
me to do but to agree. Then I ventured again: 

"Where do you live, Bill?" 

"T'coma, Washington." 

"Like it out there? Is that where you got those rosy 
cheeks ?" 

He nodded as if forced to an answer, but paying as little 
attention as possible to all superfluous questions. 

He asked suddenly, "Can you play horse?" 

"Why, of course, I can," I answered more readily than I 
should, had I known what was to follow. 

"Then let's play." Taking quick advantage of his chance 
he continued, "You be horse and I'll be driver. Get some 

Page Eleven 



^f)t CoHes^ ^vetiinQH 




rope and I'll fix you," ordered the young manager before I 
had time to recall my rash words. 

Immediately I began the search for a rope, constantly 
encouraged by the commander. When at last a rope was 
found I meekly allowed myself to be harnessed for the game. 

Quite in command of the situation, he issued his next 
order: 

"We'll have to go out doors, where we c'n have jus' lots 
o' room." 

"That would be better," I agreed, thinking of the break- 
able objects about the rooms. 

Out of doors the game began. 

"Gedup! Gedup!" roared the driver. I, the horse, quick- 
ly responded stirring up the dusty fallen leaves as we tore 
furiously around the yard. 

Just as I felt worthy of discharge on the grounds of com- 
petent service, I heard Billy complaining: 

"This ain't big 'nuf. Get out in the street." 

"0, no, Billy; I couldn't do that," I gasped, out of breath 
from such strenuous and prolonged exercise. 

This first check of the strong young will soon made me 
feel I had been anything but discreet. As I was considering 
what retreat I could make the young driver wailed out: 

"I'll tell my mamma if you don't!" 

Signs of a coming storm, threatening to be no small mat- 
ter, influenced me to choose the lesser of the two evils. 

"Don't cry. Bill. Look out, your horse'll run away," and 
I jerked the rope from his hand and ran out of the yard into 
the street. 

Gleefully the small boy came after me, tears all gone. 

We had just started the new game, when we heard some 
one calling: 

"Billy! 0, Billy, dear! come in the house." 

Inwardly rejoicing, I recognized the voice of Billy's 
mother, and promptly took Billy to the house. 

I was well rewarded for all my efforts when I heard Billy 
say: 

"0 mamma, I jus' had the bestest time playin' horse. 
She wants me to come tomorrow and play again." 

Marie Miller, '16. 
Page Twelve 



hM 


Wtft CoUege ^rectinfftf J| 



LOST-A BIRD DOG 

"Mother, do you know, I think Fritz is a regular story- 
book dog. Isn't he just beautiful? After he's had a bath, 
he is so lovely, all snowy white, except his curly brown ears 
and chestnut eyes. And curled up on that brown rug he 
surely is a picture." 

"Your delight in the aesthetic value of such a color 
scheme is leading you to forget what I told you this morning. 
That dog cannot stay in the house all the time you do, and 
he must not lie on that new brown rug, even if it does match 
his eyes. Take him out doors. It's too bad his story-book 
qualities do not extend to behavior, and prevent him from 
running away. Since they don't, however, be sure you tie 
him securely, or by supper time you'll probably hear he's 
miles from here." 

Knowing the finality of mother s tone too well to argue, 
I was starting towards the door, when Daddy hurried in with 
the information, ''Jim and I are going to drive out to 
George's. Just got word from him to come out for a day's 
shoot. 

To-morrov.''s the first day of the season, and he knows 
where there are several bunches of quail. We'll have a big 
day's sport, but we must start right away or we won't get 
there before dark, and I don't know the road." 

"But, Daddy, surely you won't take Keno. He's so beau- 
tiful and clean and he'll come home all dirty and full of burrs 
and — " 

"Fritz, as I've" told you on several similar occasions, is no 
lap-dog. Hunting's the only thing in the world he's good 
for, and while the season's on, he has to work." 

No more chance for argument with Daddy than with 
mother. Story-book dog Keno might be, but truly I was no 
story-book daughter. In the rush of helping Daddy get ready 
I had little time to consider my own hurt feelings. "Where's 
that old brown cap? Now I'd like to know what could have 

Page Thirteea 




^iit CoUese Greetings; 



gone with those heavy gloves. I left them on the table some 
time last week. See if you can find my ammunition box, and 
fill my vest with the shells in the lower tray. Where's my 
gun cleaner? I left in on the hall-tree the last time I used 
it. You'd better fill the thermos bottle with hot coffee, for 
it will be a long cold drive." Mother and I were equal to 
these commands. At the end of half an hour everything had 
been found and Daddy was driving off, with my beautiful 
Fritz, bounding ahead and hurrying back, happy in the pros- 
pect of a long run. 

That evening as mother and I were reading there came 
a whine and scratch at the door, and then a short, sharp bark. 
Wliy that can't be Keno — but — and I opened the door. There 
on the door mat, with drooping head, sat my story-book dog. 

To my "Why, Keno, you naughty dog, did you run 
away?" there came in answer a whimpering cry, and Fritz 
sneaked past me into the hall. Such a sight! White silky 
hair was hidden by mud and burrs; curly brown ears, stiff 
with Spanish needles; chestnut eyes east down and furtive; 
paws bleeding and sore told too plainly that as a bird-dog 
Keno had been guilty of the supreme misdemeanor. He haa 
chased a rabbit, chased it far away from the road, had lost 
his way, and frightened and ashamed, had crept home. 
Somewhere out in the country was an angry Daddy, whistling 
and looking and saying uncomplimentary I told you so's 
about a daughter that would make a pet of a bird dog and 
upset all his efforts at discipline. 

Mother interrupted my thoughts with: "It is surprising, 
isn't it, that story-book dogs, as well as story-book heroes, do 
sometimes go astray? Fritz isn't exactly picturesque, and the 
cellar's the best place for him just now." 

Again I knew it was no use to argue. Again there was 
nothing to do but obey. Janette Powell. 



Page Fourteen 



(Kfje CoUese (Jlreettngsi 



LINCOLN'S ADDRESS AND LETTERS 

The charm in reading a collection of Lincoln's addresses 
and letters lies not merely in their style, but in the underly- 
ing spirit of his personality. In them is found a revelation 
of the height and breadth and depth of his own nature. The 
great source of his eloquence lay in the strength of his log- 
ical faculty, the supreme pov;er of reasoning and understand- 
ing. Whether his writings were inaugural addresses or mes- 
sages to Congress; whether they were political or non-polit- 
ical — they show uniformly a clearness of logic and a strict 
adherence to the issues involved. Especially in his debates 
with Douglas did he never fail to make all material focus up- 
on the point under discussion. In even the most intricate of 
those discussions, he made himself so clear he could not be 
misunderstcd or misrepresented. Here, too, he announced his 
opinions confidently and sincerely, always standing square to 
his convictions and forming his utterances so they could not 
fail to carry conviction to men of every grade of intelligence. 
His address on "Our Political Institutions" is an intense ap- 
peal to patriotism and displays an impassioued oratory worthy 
of the most eloquent. The addresses of his later life show 
more real finish and more real beauty perhaps than those of 
an earlier time. Even from the most critical literary stand- 
point they seem almost faultless. His presidential speeches 
are admiiablc in every respect. From impromptu replies to 
serenades, to the immortal speech at Gettysburg and the tre- 
mendous second inaugural address, all of President Lincoln's 
utterances possess the supreme quality of oratory — grace. 

His letters of consolation to parents whose sons had died 
on the battlefield are inimitably expressed in terms of tender 
sympathy and sincerity with a perfect adaptation of word and 
sentiment to the spirit and needs of the occasion. Hi his let- 
ters to political opponents he was never rude or impatient, al- 
ways combining friendliness and courtesy with an unfaltering 
and masterly statement of his principles. Throughout all his 
writings as an impassioned orator, clear sighted politician or a 

Page Fifteen 



Wift CoUege (J^reetingjS 




devoted friend, he showed himself master of thought and 
language. Mary Nanon Linney, '15. 



ALL IN PREPARATION 

Often had I heard the old saying, "No rest for the wick- 
ed and the righteous don't need any," but never did I feel it 
quite so true or so well illustrated as at this trying time, be- 
fore exams. The conscientious go about with tantalizingly 
peaceful faces, although they try to be worried and uneasy 
when caught in a discussion of coming ordeals. Behind the 
calm exterior of these lucky creatures is the assurance of good 
marks, the memory of extra study hours. While we, of the 
happy-go-lucky brand, look back upon the leisure time we 
spent in tennis, walks and fudge parties, first with a sinky, 
repentant feeling, then with almost defiance. At any rate, 
we console ourselves, we had good times, and that is more 
than the righteous can say. 

But here are these exams coming nearer and nearer. It 
is no use to attempt to deny that we are frightfully shaky. 
With grim, determined faces we hang out "Engaged" signs 
so forbidding that the skull and cross bones are tame in com- 
parison. We study furiously for a few minutes; then spas- 
modically we stop and try to recall what it is all about and 
what the connection with the rest of the work. Everything 
is a hopeless jumble. Latin, English, History and French, in- 
stead of marching sedately by to be reviewed in order, hurry 
pell-mell, topsy-turvy through our minds. Punctuation rules 
are tangled, beyond recognition, with the War of the Eoses 
and the conjugation of verbs. When we attempt to bring or- 
der out of such chaos we feel as if we should shriek with des- 
pair. 

The week before us appears a big blot, dotted thickly 
with hours of mental terror and torture; sprinkled about are 
other hours scarcely less torturous — advanced lessons, un- 
learned. The second of February will be as the shore to a 
drowning man, if we can but get to it alive. 
Page Sixteen 



tKfje CoUcge (greetingg 



To make matters worse the desperate thought and fran- 
tic efforts to absorb some knowledge are interrupted by the 
provokingly sweet voice of a systematic, orderly, conscientious 
fellow-student (we can't say sufferer, and we ought not, for 
our own sake say "student"). She blandly inquires why we 
don't take one thing at a time instead of haying three differ- 
ent texts and as many note books open before us. A glance 
at the all-inclusive outline she is making, or the far sighted 
questions she has made out to quiz herself, calls forth an in- 
voluntar}^ exclamation of wonder, but there is no time to mar- 
vel. The clock shows that the precious moments are not wait- 
ing for us. The suggestion given is not bad; we decide to 
follow it, but who could endure having that methodical crea- 
ture witness our attempts? Hence, after casting about for 
the most pressing and serious need, v>'e grasp the text book 
and lit e to the library. Here the struggles are feverishly con- 
tinued, but the distracted efforts of like victims render the 
atmosphere more endurable to our overtaxed minds — and 
somehow life goes on. Freda Sidell, '15. 



THE CHAUCER CLASS 

In connection with the lyrics of Chaucer, the class has 
had occasion to examine som.e of the types of French verse 
de societe, especially the triolet and the roundel. The struc- 
ture of these little tid-bits of the poet's art is so conventional 
and the laws of rhyme so difficult to follow that few have 
attempted them. Austin Dobson's "Eose Kissed Me Today" 
is a charming little thing: 

"Eose kissed me to-day; 
Will she kiss me tomorrow? 
Let it be as it may, 
Eose kissed me to-day, — 
But the pleasure gives way 
To a savor of sorrow; — 
Rose kissed me to-day, 
Will she kiss me to-morrow? 

Class rhyming must always be more or less perfunctory, 

Page Seventeen 



Cfjc CoUege Greetings! 



but two specimens seem worthy a little place, 
wrote: 

Your hair is so pretty, 
Fm in love with you quite. 
You're the cause of this ditty, 
Your hair is so pretty. 
Though you may not be witty. 
To me you're just right. 
Your hair is so pretty, 
I'm in love with you quite. 

And Miss Stevenson wrote: 

I like her pink bow, 
I like none other better, 
And she wears it so. 
I like her pink bow. 
Though it really did grow 
From a fat Christmas letter: 
I like her pink bow, 
I like none other better. 



Miss Cathcart 




Page Eighteen 



^l}z College ^reetingsf 




FacuIvTY Committee— Miss Weaver, Miss Tanner, Miss Neville 
Editor— Lois M. Coultas 

Associate Editors— Elizabeth Tendick, Letta Irwin, Mary Lawson 
Business Managers- Elizabeth Dunbar, Emily Jane Allan, Helena 
Munson 



In the opening chapel service on January eighth, 
Dr. Harker gave an impressive talk on the significance ol 
work. The majority of us have, as yet, done no definite work 
— our lives so far have heen a preparation for that which is 
to come. An insurance company, he told us, issues its poli- 
cies on the supposition that every man will live one-half as 
long as the difference between his present age and ninety. 
Taking twenty as the average age of the students here, we 
shall each have at least thirty-five years to do the big Job 
ahead of us — thirty-five years more of life with its hidden 
possibilities. Multiplying the thirty-five by the two hundred 
students in chapel, the latent possibilities for us during the 
next few years cannot be estimated. The keynote for what 
our lives should be was struck when Dr. Harker said: "Let 
thy work appear unto thy servants and thy glory to their 
children" — work for us here in our lifetime, with no thought 
of personal glory. 

It is not unusual for us to hear many people speak of 
college friendships as the best and the most lasting of om 
lives. We gladly grant this, yet as we view college friend- 
ships from our close vantage ground, we feel that they are 
composed of two distinct classes. There is the friendship 
that flares up brightly on the altar of sudden attraction and 
as suddenly dies down to black ashes. On the other hand, 
most fortunately, there is the friendship that in its quietly 
certain growth and its ever increasing beauty reminds us of 
the gradual and sure growth of the oak. Into one of these 
two classes do all the girls who, in their four year college 
home, seek and make friendships, naturally fall. 

With what awesome interest do we behold the outbursts 
of sudden friendship! With what panic-stricken hearts do 

Page l^ineteen 



Wi)t CoUege (Hreetmssi 



we have it forced upon our consciousness that we, poor, 
little, insignificant, so happy in our tiny circle, that we 
have been, no, are being proffered a friendship, whose de- 
lights the giver is sure few mortals can comprehend. Feebly 
and anxiously do we attempt to escape the entangling claims, 
and to avert its eager confidences. There is something stu- 
pendous about this prodigal giving of self. Truly, the sanei, 
quieter methods of advancing in friendship, which had once 
been our standard, we even grow to doubt. Are we of colder, 
more phlegmatic natures than are our freely-giving new 
friends? Is there some thing with us radically wrong, some- 
thing that debars us forever from the joys of quick and ra- 
diant spontaneity, we ask ourselves in inner questioning. 

The days pass; before we have answered the question 
satisfactorily to our own minds, a slight coolness has sprung 
up. Some day when, in planning a long walk or sewing 
party, our new friend's name, inadvertently, has been omit- 
ted, and we are met by a reproachful, surprised glance. Apolo- 
gies and reconciliation follow, as does, also, in a few days a 
second like offense. Another week and the friendship is ab 
if it had never been. 

Happily we resume the old untroubled days of quiet se- 
renity. No longer does an insistent voice claim our thoughts 
and actions. Once more we have time for the old relations 
with our neighbors. Acquaintances we have almost lost sight 
of, are again visited on terms of jolly comradeship, and slowly 
but naturally do the more congenial natures seek out and find 
their counterparts. From careless comradery and the invol- 
untary glance of sudden sympathy, to half timid and un- 
spoken advances, is the chain of a new friendship slowly 
welded. Carefully tended at first, and only gradually permit- 
ted to support full weight, each link is finally brought to 
completion. 



Page Twenty 



Wift College ^reetingsf 




©epartmentg 

ART NOTES 

Several of the students in the School of Fine Arts have 
increased the amount of time spent in the studio classes, ana 
Leila Haggett has entered for the regular art course. 

Girls in the various societies should be interested in the 
classes in poster designing which will be organized in the near 
future. 

Clara Kirk, a student in the department in 1910-1911, 
visited the studio classes on January tenth. 

Second year design class begins the study of perspec- 
tive and interior decoration this month. 



EXPRESSION NOTES 

During the Christmas holidays Miss Kidder gave several 
readings, appearing at Chatfield, Minn., where she read "The 
Servant in the House, and at Osage, Iowa, where she read 
"The Passing of the Third Floor Back.'' 

The present day interest in the drama is being stimulated 
by the readiness of readers to place it in a prominent place on 
their repertoires; and Miss Kidder has met with great success 
in the reading of these as well as numerous other modern 
dramas. 



COLLEGE OF^MUSIC 

The Term recital was given Monday evening, December 
sixteenth, and was a success in every sense of the word. The 
selections in each case were of unusual merit and quality. The 
program was as follows: 

Organ — First Sonata (first movement) Guilmant 

Alice Mathis. 

Page Twenty-one 



Wi)z College (greetings; 



Piano — Impromptu in B flat minor Schubert 

Moss Carter. 

Voice — Charmante Papillon Campra (1660-1744:, 

Ima Berryman. 

Piano — Yalse Caprice Eubinstein 

Lucile dinger. 

Voice — Two Songs from the Jhelum Eiver Cycle 

Woodf arde-Finden 

Helen Jones. 

Piano — Spinning Song from "Flying Dutchman" 

Wagner-Liszt 

Anne Fitzpatrick. 

Piano — (a) Norwegian Bridal Procession Grieg 

(b) Aus dem Carneval Grieg * 

Mary Easley. 

Violin- — Scene de Ballet De Beriot 

Helen Harrison. 

Piano — Eondo Capriccioso Mendelssohn 

Freda Fenton. 

Piano — Ballade in G minor Grieg 

Deane Obermeyer. 

Voice — (a) 0, No Longer Seek to Pain Me Scarlatti 

(b) Yesterday and Today Spross 

Hazel Belle Long. 

Piano — Scherzo in B flat minor Chopin 

Mary Shastid. 
Two pianos — Introduction to third act and Bridal Song 

from "Lohengrin" Wagner 

Lucile Olingerj Moss Carter, Letta Irwin, Anne Fitzpatrick. 

Of the four remaining numbers of the Artists' Course 
three will be musical. Nina DimitriefP, soprano, was to have 
appeared January thirteenth, but her engagement was post- 
poned. The Passmore Trio, violin, piano and 'cello, will ap- 
pear on the evening of February fourth. The last musical 
number will be Alfred Calzin, pianist, who wall appear April 
fourth. 

Director Swarthout will have charge of the Glee Club 
Page Twenty-two 



^fje CoHege (greetings; 



^^ 



this term and Miss Beebe will liave the class in the History 
of Music. 

Director and Associate Director Swarthout appeared in 
joint recital on the evening of January twenty-seventh. The 
following program proved again to the appreciative audience 
the artistic a'bility of these musicians: 

Violin and piano — Sonata in E flat Saint Saens 

Violin — Concerto in A major Sinding 

Piano — Concerto in B fiat minor Tschaikowsky 

(Orchestral accompaniment on second piano.) 

SOCIETY NOTES 

The members of the Theta Sigma society have taken up 
the work of the society with a very commendable spirit. 

An enthusiastic business meeting was held at which Floy 
Newlin and Madeline McDaniels were elected pages. 

The society is planning to take up regular work in par- 
liamentary rules and regulations, that promises to be of great 
benefit to the girls. 

The Theta Sigma song: 
Joyfully turning 

Minds in pleasant paths and right, 
Bright rays of learning 

Gild our way with light. 
Music's magic splendor 

Heaves our bosoms with its swell, 
Strains of music tender 

Charm us with their spell. 
Theta Sigma, dear! Shed thy 

Light of truth and love. 
Theat Sigma, dear! Lead our 
Thoughts above. 



The Lambda Alpha Mu society held its first regular 
meeting in Expression Hall, December tenth. After a short 
spicy program, in which an especially good number was a 

Page Twenty-three 




tKfje CoUegc Greetings; 




reading by Miss Ida Perry, the new members were initiated 
anH were welcomed by our president into the ranks of 
Lambda Mu. We are very proud of our initiates. 

The second program, December seventeenth, held in its 
talks upon current events a hint of the type of work we 
shall take up during the rest of the school year. It is our 
plan to undertake, in the four months that are to follow, a 
study of certain live questions that are being widely dis- 
cussed by all our magazines. The month of February will be 
given to the study of immigration, while March will be spent 
in thinking over labor questions. Each meeting will take up 
a different phase of the subject in hand for the month. The 
work promises to be very fascinating and all our girls are 
looking forward with a great deal of pleasure to the general 
discussions which are to be a regular part of each meeting. 
We are confident of deriving much instruction as well as en- 
joyment from the study, for our girls have come back after 
the holidays more enthusiastic than ever, and very anxious 
indeed to get down to some definite kind of work. With such 
spirit, we have great hopes for the year 1913. 



Belles Lettres regrets that owing to the illness of her 
father, Freda Fenton will be unable to return to college this 
semester. Her office as Belles Lettres chorister has not yet 
been filled. Helen Gahring also is unable to return. 

The marriage of Mary LaTeer, an old Belles Lettres, to 
Dr. Charles Terrill Alexander of Champaign, Illinois, took 
place at her home in Paxton, 111., New Year's afternoon. 
Miss LaTeer graduated from the College of Music in 1909, 
and is an accomplished musician. Miss Inez Freeman of Ma- 
son City sang beautifully "All for You," while the wedding 
party was forming. Miss Freeman also played Mendelssohn's 
Wedding March. During the ceremony, accompanied by Miss 
Nell Smith on the violin, she rendered Schubert's Serenade. 
Helen Goodell of Loda was bridesmaid. Other I. W. C. girls 
Page Twenty-four 




tIDfje CoUege Greetings! 



present were Miss Anna Schaffer, Miss Hazel Belle Long and 
Miss Laura Jones. 



At a joint business meeting, held just before the holi- 
days, the Phi Nu and Belles Lettres societies voted to pledge 
themselves to five hundred dollars each for the endowment 
and improvement fund. 

Several things have hapj)ened during the holidays which 
will be of interest to both active and alumnae members of so- 
ciety. One event which makes us feel more strongly than 
ever that "once a Phi Nu, always a Phi I^fu," was the Phi Nu 
banquet held at the Plaza Hotel in Danville, Illinois, January 
fourth. There are several alumnae members living in the vi- 
cinity of Danville, and as many as could arrange it were pres- 
ent. 

After greetings and much friendly discussion, for there 
was much to ask and to tell, toasts were given. Miss Mary 
Hughes of Hume was toastmistress, and the program began 
by singing the new Phi Nu song. The words and music were 
composed by two of our present members. It was the first 
time the song had been used and was dedicated by enthusias- 
tic singing. 

The programs were pretty booklets done in brown with 
the gold leaf on the cover. They contained the Phi Nu and 
college songs and the menu, which was served in six courses. 
The following toasts were given: 

The Phi Nu Woman — Mrs. Seymour. 

Eelation of the Phi Nu of the Past to the Phi Nu of the 
Future — Miss Gladys Henson. 

Phi Nu of the Present — Miss Celia Cathcart. 

We ended by singing the Phi Nu song with all our 
hearts. 

The older members have organized into a Phi Nu 
Alumnae Association, and it was decided to make the banquet 

Page Twenty-five 



Wi}t College (greetingg 



an annual affair. Danville being the most centrally located, 
was agreed upon as the place. 

On New Year's day, also in Danville, one of our old 
members. Miss Madge Olmsted, became Mrs. Chester All- 
bright, and is now living in Chicago. The wedding was held 
at her home, which was decorated in the color scheme of yel- 
low and white. Madge, in her white satin gown, fulfilled her 
part as bride most charmingly, and took her vows with such 
sweet solemnity that none could doubt her happiness in her 
choice. Her old I. W. C. friends present were: Lois Woods, 
Kansas City; Georgia Johnson and Frances Freeman, Dan- 
ville; Celia Cathcart and Freda Sidell, Sidell, 111., and Lyone 
Schaffer, Oakland, 111. 

Our return to school was saddened by the news of the 
sudden death of Sue Houston, one of our old girls. She died 
at Blessing's hospital in Quincy just a few days before school 
opened here. We feel so glad that she was back last fall for 
the Phi Nu banquet and made us that visit. 

Christmas letters were written to the one living charter 
member of Phi Nu and to Mr. Jumper, whose wife was a 
charter member. 



ALUMNA NOTES 

The recent appointment of Mr. Adolph Gore to the 
principalship of the Jacksonville high school brings with him 
to the city his wife, who will be remembered as Hortense 
Campbell, a graduate of the College of Music in the class ol 
1907. A two-year old son, William, and a daughter, Mary 
Katherine, born January eighth, constitute the little family 
that is cordially welcomed to the community. 

On November twenty-fourth a daughter, Ellen Virginia, 
was born to Mr. and Mrs. Earl Wiswell. Mrs: Wiswell as 
Clara Mayfield spent several years in study at the Woman's 
College. 

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Ewart on De- 
cember second. Mrs. Ewart was a member of the I. W. C. 
class of 1905. 

To Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Goebel a daughter was born on 
January fifth. Mrs. Goebel as Elizabeth Mathers has the 
distinguished honor of being a member of three I. W. C. 
classes, having received diplomas from 'GO, '02, '05. 

Mrs. Helen Lambert Tillson, '09, and her small daugh- 
ter, who have spent several months in Jacksonville while 

Page Twenty-six 



Lieutenant Tillson was on duty in New Mexico, has rejoined 
her husband on his return to Fort Riley, Kansas. 

Misses Millicent Rowe and Mary Wadsworth, after the 
Christmas holidays at home, have returned to Boston to re- 
sume their studies. 

Among the recent benefactions bestowed upon the col- 
lege is a gift of $1,000 made by Mrs. Alice Wight Hall, a 
member of the class of 1885. The gift is made in memory 
of Mrs. Hall's mother, who also was a student in the college. 

After several years of absence Miss Frances McGinnis 
has returned to her home in Jacksonville. Miss McGinnis, 
class of '56, was for some years a teacher in the public schools 
of the city, and also in the School for the Blind. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Harker Riddell and her year old daugh- 
ter, Elizabeth Ann, have been spending the holidays with 
President and Mrs. Harker. One beautiful event of the fam- 
ily holiday reunion was the christening by President Harker 
of his only granddaughter. Mrs. Jennie Harker Atherton 
of Cincinnati also was here for a short visit. 

From Mrs. Phoebe Kreider Murray, '90, has been re- 
ceived a report of the semi-annual reunion of the Los An 
geles branch of the I. W. C. Association, which was held Sat- 
urday afternoon, ISTovember twenty-third, at the home of 
Mrs. E. Y. Murray. The meeting was called to order by the 
president, Mrs. Parthenia Tureman Harrison and the min- 
utes of the last m^eeting read. Mrs. Elliott offered a slight 
correction. Two beautiful violin solos were played by Miss 
Edith Morgan, after which Miss Farley of the Cumnock 
School of Expression in Los Angeles gave an interesting 
resume of her three years of teaching at I. W. C. She spoke 
of our honored president. Dr. J. R. Harker, of his indefatig- 
able zeal in building up the college, and of the wonders he 
has accomplished, and of Miss Trout, Miss Weaver and Miss 
Kinder, who were there when she was, and of several of the 
students, of the people of Jacksonville, and of their kindness 
to her during her serious illness, and of the spirit of sympa- 
thy and good will that seemed to pervade the college and 
also the town towards the college. Mrs. Best spoke of her 
experience with I. W. C, both as teacher and as the mother 
of three college girls. Twenty-five years ago this fall she first 
went to Jacksonville, and for ten years knew the college well. 
She has lost neither her interest in nor her sympathy for the 
school. For the benefit of those who were not present at the 
May meeting, Mrs. Harrison spoke of the interesting paper 
of Mrs. Eby, and when she mentioned the method of heating 

Page Twenty-seven 



^'i)t CoUege ^vtttin^i 




the college at that time and how wood for the students' rooms 
was drawn up to the windows by means of pulleys, Mrs. Gat- 
ton exclaimed: "Why, I remember that!" Mrs. Marion Wal- 
lace Gatton gave an impromptu talk and told how glad she 
was to be present. When her card of invitation came, she was 
almost afraid to accept for fear the members would all be 
young people, none of her day, and the meeting would be to 
her as sad as a funeral, but with old friends around her, how 
different was the reality. A letter was read from Miss Anne 
Johnson, inviting the association to hold its May meeting 
with her mother, Mrs. Melinda Harrison Johnson, one of the 
two surviving members of the class of 1852, the first class. 
This invitation was accepted, and it was voted that Miss 
Johnson be made an honorary member of our organization. 
The college song was sung, and at Mrs. Harrison's request, 
Mrs. Murray gave the history of its writing. Eefreshments 
were served, Mrs. Anthony and Mrs. Elliott presiding at the 
tea table, and the Misses Morgan asisting the hostess in serv- 
ing. A social hour was enjoyed and the shades of evening 
were falling when the last guest departed. Those present 
were: Mrs. Harrison, Mrs. Alkin, Mrs. Lane, Miss ■ Sibert, 
Mrs. Anthon}^ Mrs. Elliott, Mrs. Best, Mrs. Gatton of Azuza, 
Miss Veach of Eedlands, Mrs. Genevieve Brown, Miss Farley, 
Miss Alta Morgan, Miss Edith Morgan, Mrs. Delia Wood 
Duckies, Mrs. Myra Morey Brockon, Miss Daws, Mrs. Ruth 
White Judson, Mrs. Kinder and Mrs. Murray. Mrs. Tureman 
of Virginia, HI., mother of Mrs. Harrison, was present as a 
guest. 

On Thursday, January the second, occurred the marriage 
of Alice Deborah Eoberts. a former I. W. C. student, to John 
W. Buzick of Mem.phis, Tenn. 

We have just received word of the death of the mother 
of Susan Rebhon, class of 1905, which occurred at Virden 
in December. 

On Monday afternoon, January thirteenth, Miss Neville, 
Miss Cowgill and Miss Anderson entertained, at a delight- 
fully informal reception, many of the I. W. C. graduates from 
Jacksonville and a few from nearby towns, with whom they 
have been especially well acquainted during the past few 
years. Miss Miller sang several songs most charmingly. Mrs. 
Harker presided at the coffee table. The afternoon was made 
particularly pleasant by the presence of Mrs. Riddell and lit- 
tle Elizabeth Anne. 

Page Twenty-eight 



iniiiiiiiiiMMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiniinniiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiMitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiMiiniiiiiiiiiMMiiMiiiiiMiM^ 

I Classy Styles We will be pleased to show you our line | 

S 3 

S = 

W. T. REAUGH 

I I 

I Fashionable Footwear | 

I For All Occasions ' | 

i I 

I 33 South Side Square Jacksonville, 111. I 



Miss C. — Oh, but you don't understand what I mean. 
You do not see the point. The point is — 



Otto Speith 
pboto portraiture 



Member Photographers Associaton of Illinois 



I The Watson Studio Southwest Corner Square | 

niiiutuHiiiiiiniiiuuiiiiiuiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHminuiiiiiiiMHiiiiiiiiiinHiiiiiiiiinniiiiHiHiiiiiiitiMiiiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiMiHiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



'jiniiiiiiiiiiMiuiiiiMiiniiMninuMniiiniiMiniiiiiiiiMiiMihHiinMniiHirniHHnnniiiH»iiiiNiiiiiiu!uiinHiiiiuHii;iijiHiiiHUiiinhiiiiiiiiniiiiuiMiiii!iiMiMii»n 



Mrs. C. — But my dear, tliere is one thing I must insist 
on, and that is that you must practice regularly. You can- 
not expect to improve otherwise. 



fCOTRELL & LEONARD 

I ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OF 

CAPS 

GOWNS and 
HOODS 

I To the American Colleges and Univer- 
I sities from the Atlantic to the Pacific; 
I Class contracts a specialty. 




GO TO 



E^tki^iies 



FOR 



I Hot and Cold Sodas 

I All kinds of Fresh and 
I Salted Nuts 

I East State St. 
?iuunitiniiuiiuiiiiiiiuiiiiiiHuiiiiiMiiiHiniiiiiiiiniHniiiiiMiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniMiiiiiiiMiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiniiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



Our Prices Make Cleaning 

a Necessity 
Dry Cleaned and Pressed 

Ladies' Li5t 

Skirls 50c 

Jackets 50c 

Waists 50c and up 

Ivongcoats i.oo 

Dresses . . . . i.oo and up 

Sanitary Cleaning Shop 

214 S. Sandy St, Both Phones 631 
We call for your goods 



Ladies' Fine Furs 
E. JENKIN 

15 West Side Square 



MIUMIHMIIIIHIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIUIIHIIIIIIIUIIIIIMINIIIUHlmillllllllllUUUIIII lllllllllllllllillllinilltlMlltlllllllllllllllinllllllllllllUlllllllllllllllllllllllllliniHIHIIIIII^ 



Dr. Albyn Lincoln Adams I 



DR. KOPPERL 
Dentist 



326 West State St. 



Oculist and Aurist 
to the State School for the Blind 

323 West State Street 

Practice limited to diseases of the 
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 



Miss D. — As I say, Miss X, as I say, you're quite right. 

Miss A. — Now we will have a few minutes of quick re- 
view work, just to keep a few dates fresh in our memory. 



Dr. R. R. BUCKTHORPE) 
Dentist 

111. Phone, House 1054 

OflSce 750 
Bell Phone, Office 512 
Over Hatch Drug Store 

Jacksonville, 111. 



DR. BYRON S. GAILEY 

EYE 
EAR 
NOSE 
THROAT 

340 West State Street 



Th<f Colleyi? Girl | 

s 

The Summer winds were kind to you | 
And left your face an Indian hue | 

But when your school work you plan | 
Of course you want to lose your tan, | 
So use YARA Greaseless Cream | 

25 cents the jar. | 

Armstrong's Drug Store S. W. Cor- | 

ner Square. | 



DR. CARL E. BLACK i 

Office— 349 E. State St. | 

Both Phones 85 | 

Residence 1305 West State St. | 

Both Phones 285 | 

Surgery — Passavant Memorial Hospital | 

and Our Saviours Hospital | 

Hospital Hours — 9:00 a. m. to 12 m. | 

Office Hours — 1:30 to 4 p. m. Even- | 
ings and Sundays by appointment | 



iiiinuiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiniiiiiiuiHiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiii iiiiiihiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiMiiiiiHiiiiiiHiiMiiiniriiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



giiiniiinimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinimiiiiiiiimiiiiMiiiiiniiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiMininiiiminiiiiHiiinmiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNmiiimiiiiiiMmm 



GEO. T. DOUGLAS 
Fancy Groceries 



234 West State St. 



738 East North St. 



Miss K. (giving a loud knock at the door) — Lights out, 
girls. Lights out. Ten o'clock. 




BROTheI 



Jacksonville's Largest Mens' Store 

Pennants and Banners 

I. W. C. and Fraternity special designs 

Mannish Cut Sweater Coats 

Hand Bag's, Trunks 

and Suits Cases 



GIRLS 

Our B by Minnette Photo 
is just the thing 
you are looking for 
Call and see 

McDougall 

The West State Street 

Photogradhcr 



Jacksonville's Best and most 
Popular 

HOTEL 

The Home of the Traveling Man 
Jno. B. Snell, Prop. 
Rates |2. 25, I2.50, and $3.00 per day | 
One Block West of Womans College | 
Opposite Post Office 
Rooms with or without bath I 

Local and Long Distance Telephone | 

in every room. 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



ruiiuiiiiiiMiiiiiiiuiiiiiiHHiniiiiiiHiniiuniiiminimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiiMiiiiiiMniiimiiiMimiiiiuiMiiiiiMimiiiiiiiiiiiiimimmiiiiii^ 



uiniiiinniHiiiniiniiuiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiriiMiiiiiiiniiiiMiMiiiiiiiiiiMiiurMiMMiiiiiMiiiiiiMiiiniinMiiiiiiiiiiiiMininiiiiniMinniniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniH 

It is our business to get new goods for you I 

We are never fully satisfied with our stock, but keep con- | 

stantly adding to it in order that no customer's needs may be over- | 

looked. Besides we believe it our duty to be forever watchful of | 

the markets and so secure "EVERYTHING" and "THE BEST" I 

We do not depend on onlyone line to make a profit — hence | 

can sell cheaper. | 

A complete line of Drugs and Groceries | 

iPhonesSOO KyOBEKyTS BIE^OS. Phones 800 1 

Open every working day and night. | 

29 South Side Sq. I 



Miss W. — Above everything, you must be observant, 
arls. Keep your eyes open and your wits about you. 



A 



t»i 



f rilled with ti^e Luxuries and Necessities whici^ appeal 
I to the i^eart of every woman 



Advanced Styles at 
Moderate Prices 



I We take a pride in proclaiming* that we have the 

I lightest, brightest store in the State of Illinois, filled by 

I a rapidly chang-ing stock of attractive merchandise, and 

I catering" ever to the wants of young women. 

I Coats Suits Dresses Costumes 

I Waists Gloves Hosiery Jewelry 

I Laces Ribbons Corsets Neckwear 

i Linens Notions Art Goods Handkerchiefs 






I LADIES* AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. I 

QllllMIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinilllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIHIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIilllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIHIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinillllllllllinillll 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

I SKIRT BOXES I 

I rocke:rs, scree^ns, desks | 

I AND BED ROOM CURTAINS i 

I AT I 

IJohnson, Hackett Sl Guthrie] 



Miss A. — I want it distinctly understood that this is 
to be a place of good honest work and if yon will meet my 
fevr requirements I am sure you will not find mathematics 
the bugbear that I know a good many of you are expecting 
it to be. 



I KODAK FINISHING 

s 

{Vulcan Roll Films 

I Cameras from $2.00 up 

lEverything" strictly first class 

I Claude B. Vail 

lOswald's Drug Store 71 E. Side Sq. 



=Frank Elliott, Pres. Wm. R. Routt, Vice-Pres. 

i C. A. Johnson, Vice-Pres. 

I J. Weir Elliott, Cashier 

I J. AUerton Palmer, Asst, Cashier 



pLLIOTT STATE BANK 

i Jacksonville, 111. 



Capital 
Undivided Profits 

Frank Elliott 
J. Weir Elliott 
Wm. R. Routt 
Wm. S. EUoitt 



$150,000 
- $ 15,000 

Frank R. ElHott 
John A. Bellatti 
C. A. Johnson 



Piepenbrings Variety Store | 

One block east of College 
HERE TO PLEASE 



Candies 
Cookies 
Sandwiches 
Groceries 



Cakes | 

Pies I 

Pop on Ice I 

California Fruits | 



School Supplies 



Girls 



Don't forget our Advertisers | 



jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiMiiiniMiMiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiHinuiiiiiuiiiininiiiiiniiiiuiiMiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiriniiiiiiiniiiiiiMiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiM 



unniiHiHmiiMiiiiniiiiMtiMiiiitmiiMiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiimniiiiiiiiimiMimiiiMiiiiiiHiiiniiiinMiiiiiHiiMiiiiiiiminiiiiiMtMiiiiiimiMiiiiiiniHiiihMiiMMM 

I § 

I The bride's first choice for the home? I 

j House Furnishings of Quality j 

3 i 

I from the i 

I ANDRE & ANDRE I 

I STO lE^E I 

I Our Special Room Furnishings will interest every student j 



Miss J.— What! You have not read that? Well, if I 
catch you reading the Ladies' Home Journal, before you have 
spent some time on Trollope, you will probably regret it. 



IHOFFMAN'S 

I 

I Lunch Room 

I Opposite Depots 

s 

i 

j 609-611 E^ast State Street 

I 

I Jacksonville, 111. 



Len G. Magill 
Printer 

East State Street 111. Phone 418 



Montgomery & Deppe 

Everything in Dry Goods 
Well Lighted First Floor Cloak and Suit Room 

Agents for the Ladies Home Journal Patterns 
The new "Howd" front laced corsets 



r<uiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiniMiiiiiiuiniiiiiiiiuiHiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiniMiniiiiiiHiiiiiiiii^ 



l^iiniiiiiiiiiiriiiuMiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiriiiMiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiunMiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiriiitiiiiiiiHHiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiriHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii^ 

j College Jewelrv ! 

I Engraved Cards and invitations I 

I Ci^aUng Dishes, Copper and Brass Goods | 

I Special Die Stationery ! 

I 21 South Side Square I 



Mr. S. — What's the matter v/ith girls? They cannot tell 
the difference bet\veen four flats and three flats. D flat, ovei 
there on the first piano. 




jACKSONVILt.e, IU.» 

Established 1890 

Low Prices Square Dealing' 
Keep us busy 



I 111. Phone 57 Bell Phone 92 

I Fresh Drugs, 

I Fancy Goods 

I Stationery 

I THE 

I BaflQtr Driio ^m 

I 2 doors West of Postofficc 

I 235 K State Street 
^niiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiniininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiMiiiiiiininimiiiiiiiminmiiiftiiiiiiiiiinininiiiiinitiiiiiiiiiimniimmiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiim 



Florence Kirk King I 

Hair Dresser [ 

Now prepared to manufact- | 

ure French hair and combings | 

into the 1912-T913 styles. | 

Shampooing and scalp mas- | 

sage by appointment at your | 

residence. | 

Illinois Phone 837 | 

Residence 503 West College Street | 



If only you'll 

Remember Cherry's 

We'll be pleased, and we 
know positively that you'll 
find no cause for complaint. 

Our horses are safe; our equi- 
p iges have character and in 
dividuality, and out prict-h ^re 
most r a>;on ble. 

Cherry's Livery 

Both Phoues Jacksonville, 111 



^iiHiuiHiiiHi"M""iiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiMiMiitiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiMiniiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiinHiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir 




FALL Foot^vear 

OUR SPECIALTY 

Dress Slippers 
Street Shoes 
5?drooiT! Slipper: 

We Repair Shoes 



Miss T. — "It is the listening ear that catches the sound. ' 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Fancy Bazaar 
and Millinery 

211 West State Street 



ITAYLOR'S 



Grocery 

A good place to trade 
221 West State Street 



Illinois Phone 419 Bell Phone 417 I 

A. L, Bromley | 

Ladies' Tailor | 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeiug and | 
Repairing. lyadies' Man Tail- | 
ored Suits to order. Remodeling | 
of all kinds. Special rates to | 
I. W. C. students. All work I 
called for and delivered promptly | 



GAY'S 

reliable: 
hardware 



7miiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiriHiiiiniiMiiuHmiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiuiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiMiiiiiiimiiimiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^^^^^ iiiriiiiiiiiiiii itiiir 



:MiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiuMiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiHiinHiiiiiiiiiniiiiniininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiitiniiiiiiniiniiHiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiininiititiniiiiiMiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiniiiiii^ 



Cafe 



Confectionary | 



Ipieacock Inn 



Catering- 



Soda 



Candies 



Miss E. — Well, girls, I don't like the looks of this room. 
Why is the table so littered, and just look at the dust under 
the dresser. I am afraid you won't get so good a grade as. last 
time. 



Oswald's 

Drug store 

71 E)ast Side Sq. 

TOIIvET ARTICLES 

PERFUMES 
FINE STATIONERY 



I Ladies' High Grade, Late Style 

s 

s 

I FUR SCARFS and MUFFS 

I ARE SOI.D BY 

I Frank Byrns 

i Most Reasonable Prices 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 East State St. Jacksonville, 111. 

Illinois Phone 388 



Pictorial Review Patterns 

For Sale at 




-^m^mi^iM^ 



^niiiiiiiMHiiiniiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiHiiiiiniiiiiiHiniiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiViiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiniiH 



iiHiiHiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiniiiiiiiuHiriiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiMiiiniiiiiiiMNmiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiininniiiiiiHiiMriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiM 



It will pay you to visit 

SCHRAM'S 

Jewelry Store 



Miss C. — Now I think it will help impress this on our 
minds, if we put Just a little summarizing statement on the 
blackboard. 



incy Articles Christmas Goods 

COOVER & SHREVE'S 
Drug Store 



lodaks and Supplies 

Developing and Finishing 



Dorwart Market 

LI. KINDS OF FRESH and 
SALT MEATS, FISH, 
POULTRY, ETC. 

oth Phones 196 230 W. State St. 



COOK 

LIGHT with GAS 
HEAT 

Jacksonville Railway & 
Light Company 

224 South Main Street 



Ask your grocer for 

HOLSUM 

BREAD 

Made Clean. Delivered clean 
in waxed paper wrappers 



iiuiiiuiuminiiiinuHiiiiiiiniiiiiMiiiiitiiiMimuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiuiiiHiniMiniHiiiiiiiuiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinS 



SLiiHniiniiiirMMiUHiniiirniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinMniiiiiUiiitiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiitniiiiiHiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiitiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiuHii^ 

I For those who discriminate 

I We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to 

I please the students who come to our city. We select only the 

I best materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. 

I Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and 

I Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. 

I Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all 

I College functions. 

I Vickery 3e Merrigan 

I C5ATEI=IERS 

I 227 West State Street 



Miss K. — Impression precedes expression. I have said so 
once, now, but you'll probably hear it many more times be- 
fore the end of the year. 



Hillerby's 
Dry Goods Store 

Safest Place 
to Trade 



I The Jacksonville National Bank 

I invites your business 

I Capital 

I Surplus 



jg200,000 

32,000 
1,100,000 



I Deposits . 

I U. S. Depository for Postal Saving Bank 

X 

i Julius E. Strawn, President 

I Miller Weir, Cashier 

I Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear 

I H. J. Rogers, A. A. Curry 

i C. B. Graff 



314 W. State St., Scott Block 
Jacksonville, 111. 

TiniHniiiinininiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiHiiiuHiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiriNiiiiiiiHUiitMiiniiHiuiMMiHiuiHHiiiiiniiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiniHH 



3 

Brady Brothers | 

Hardware, Cutlery 
Paints 



C.S.MARTINI 

I 

Fine Pictures — Artistic Framing | 

Frames and Ovals of all 
descriptions and sizes 



Imported and Domestic 
Wall Paper 



I 



I 



iHHninniinnmmMiiiiiiMiiniiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiMninriuiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiin 

E 

The most dainty thing's in Rings and Jewelry. | 

New and handsome styles of gfoods in Sterling- Silver | 

Hig-hest grades of Cut Glass, and every | 

description of Spectacles and E)ye Glasses | 

Fine Diamonds a Specialty I 

at I 

RUSSE)LL & LYON'S | 

X 

West Side Square | 

Both Phones 96 i 



Miss McL. (10 o'clock) — What's the matter with the 
light, girls? 







1 




F. E. Farrell E. E. Crabtree 


'i 
i 

1 


Mathis, Kamm & Shibe say 


Established 1864 


i 


We can furnish your 
Shoes and Party Slippers 


P. G. FARRh^LL & CO. 


r 


in the popular styles, 


BANKERS 


3 


leathers, and 
fabrics 


Successors to First National Bank 


i 
1 




Jacksonville, 111. 


1 
J 



Concern 



ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 



innwimiiiniiiiiimiiiiuiniiiiiuiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



i!.iirniiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiniiiuiiiMiHiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiniiiiNniniiiiiii(iuiiiiiiiiiiMiiuniiiiiiiiiiiniiinHiniMiiiiiiiirnMiiiinnriiiiiiiiiiiriininiiinnniiiiiiiiiuiuiin 



J. A. OBERMBYER 



HARRY P. OBERMEYER 



CITY DRUG AND BOOK STORE 

Stationery, Pennants, Novelties, Drug's and 
TOILE)T REQUISITES 

Quality Counts — We Count 
Phones: Illinois 572, Bell 457 Corner South Main St: and Square 



Miss S. — What do you do all summer? Don't you ever 
put away your embroidery long enough to read? I'll give you 
a list of good books to read. 



IHARBY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO. 

I Designs, Cut Flowers, 

j Plants 

I Southwest Corner Square 

i Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

I Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

I Greenhouses, Bell 775 



THE SATISFACTION 
we enjoy through selling you 

OUR FINE SHOES 

is equaled only by 

YOUR SATISFACTION 

in wearing them 

Evening Slippers 

Jas. McGinnis & Co- 

62 East Side Square 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING 

for the latest in Suits. Ladies' Underwear, Ribbons 

Laces, Embroidery Materials or Notions 

Visit the store that carries the 

up-to-date merchandise 

F=HE:L-F=© & OSBOFRIME 



rHiiiiniiiMiiiiiniiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiuiiiuiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



iiniiiniiiirHiiiiiiiiiiniiiJiiHiiiiMiiiiiiiiHiitiiiiiiiiMiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiimMiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimHiiiiiiiiiiiiimuiiMn 



X^» ^Br'o^w^ML 



SHKET MUSIC, MUSIC ME)RCHANDISE) 

TALKING MACHINES, RECORDS 

AND SUPPLIES 

19 SOUTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE 



Mr. M. — Make out your schedule Just as you did in the 
fall, and after your teachers have seen it, file it in the office. 



Capital 
00,000 

Surplus 
^^0,000 

Deposits 
^1,000,000 

FOUNDED 1852 




The combined capi- 
tal and surplus of this 
bank is 

One Quarter 
Million 
Dollars 

the largest of any bank 
in Morgan County. 

UNITED STATES 
DEPOSITORY 



I OFFICERS 

I M. F. Dunlap, President O. F. Buffe, Cashier 

I Andrew Russel, Vice President R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashier 

I R. M. HockenhuU, Vice President H. C. Clement, Asst. Cashier 

I C. G. Rutledge, Vice President 



i Owen P. Thompson 
I Edward F. Goltra 
I John W. Leach 



DIRECTORS 
George Deitrick 
R. M. HockenhuU 
M. F. Dunlap 



Harry M. Capps f 
O. F. Buffe I 

Andrew Russel 1 



F<i"i>nniniiiiiHMKiitiiiuiniNiMiMiiiiiMMiiiiiiiiiniiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiniiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiuiiiu 




Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1850 



ExtenBion 
Erected 1902 



Harlrer Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

I College of Liberal Arts | 

I (Full classical and scientific courses) I 

I College of Music [ 

= i 

I School of Fine Arts | 

I School of Expression | 

I School of Home Economics I 

I CA Standard College — one of the best. I 

I Regular college and academy courses I 

I leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- i 

I inently a Christian college with every i 

I facility for thorough work. Located I 

I in the Middle West, in a beautiful, I 

I dignified, old college town, noted for [ 

I its literary and music atmosphere. I 

[ Let us have names of your friends | 

I who are looking for a good college. i 

I Call or address. Registrar | 

I Illinois Woman's College, I 

1 Jacksonville, 111. I 




-iiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiimiiiniiiiiiiiMiiMimiiiiiimMiimmmiMimiiiiiiiiiinimnimiminiiimiiiiriiiiiiniiiiiiniiniiiiiiiimiiiiiHmiiiiiiinimimiinm^ ' 



tSTfje CoIIese (Greetings 

(5^ The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 
^ Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnse. They are due 
the twentieth of each month. 

<[] Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
€j| Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 



Contents 

Lion in Camp 3 

Alastor 6 

Everygirl and Examination Week 7 

Editorial 14 

Local Calendar 15 

Endowment Stunts 18 

Day of Prayer . 20 

Home Economics 21 

Music 23 

Art 24 

Society 25 

Class Functions 28 

Washington's Birthday 30 

Pasmore Trio 30 

Alumnae Notes 31 

Exchanges 33 

Y. W. C. A. Notes 34 



The 

Graphic Arts 

Concern 



Ji l l ^ 1^ 



Hear the sledges with the bells — 
Silver bells! 
What a world of merriment their melody foretells! 
How they tinkle, tinkle, tinkle, 

In the icy air of night! 
While the stars, that oversprinkle 
All the heavens, seem to twinkle 
With a crystalline delight; 
Keeping time, time, time. 
In a sort of Runic rhyme, 
To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells 
From the bells, bells, bells, bells. 
Bells, bells, bells — 
From the jingling and the tinkling of the bells. 

—E. A. Poe 



^ 1 1 t l l^ 



Cte College (^reetmgsf 

Vol. XVI Jacksonville, 111., March, 191 3 No. 6 

A LION IN CAMP 

The deer season opened with the most dismal 
weather than can be imagined. Such drenching, 
soaking days are all very well for people in Oregon 
or Washington, who declare that "the rain is never 
wet," but for common, human, eager hunters in 
Colorado, such a superabundance of moisture is apt 
to dampen spirits as well as clothing. A kindly 
weather man must have discovered that none of our 
party were either Oregonians or Washingtonians, for 
the clouds and the rain were chased away and the 
most ideal camping days followed. 

Taking advantage of the change of weather, we 
left the ranch at three o'clock in the morning, pro- 
vided with all necessities but no luxuries, for there 
were not many tenderfeet in the party. As we rode 
along, getting deeper into the mountains, and becom- 
ing more and more elated over the prospects of a 
good hunt, it was suggested that our guide take us 
directly to a good camp site, on the La Poudre River, 
instead of waiting for daylight, when we could pack 
down our tents and extra provisions. These we 
left at a mountaineer's cabin at the head of a canyon, 
leading to the river. Sundown saw us settled tempo- 
rarily, with a glorious pine fire cracking and three 
good sized trout being fried for our supper. A tar- 
paulin and fallen leaves felt better than a bed of 
down after our long ride of fifty miles on horseback. 
Every one was so tired that I doubt if any even 
dreamed of a deer. If they did, they were fortunate 

Page Three 




Cfje CoIIese ^vtttiriQi 



^^ 



to see one even in fancy, for the creatures seemed 
to known that the hunting season was open. 

We were all up early the next morning and the 
rest of our camp paraphernalia was brought down. 
Tents were up in a jiffy, and the beauty of our camp 
arrangement was, that no one had to stay home for 
fear visitors or raiders should come. We were quite 
five miles from any house or other people, as far as 
we knew. 

There were five in the party. While two of us 
followed up the river, which had the reputation of 
being the best trout stream in that part of the state, 
the other three set out with their rifles. They had 
announced their determination to bring down a deer 
or to eat none of our fish. But luck was against 
the hunters. They came home late in the afternoon 
with empty hands and ravenous appetities for the 
exquisite rainbow trout, which we displayed with 
pride. The riffles and deep pools alike had taken in 
our flies— due entirely to our cleverness in casting, 
we thought. However, we heard disgusted mutters 
of "just pure luck," and of the "fish takin' pity on 
a couple of poor fishermen." 

The next few days passed in much the same man- 
ner, the luck always being with the disciples of Isaac 
Walton. The end of the first week came and still 
the hunting license was a mockery. One night after 
supper we all sat around our big fire, watching for 
the moon to rise above the tops of the mountains. 
When it appeared, it was high in the sky and the 
woods back of us seemed all the blacker because of 
the moon's brightness. We were all so comfortably 
quiet that we were growing sleepy, when from across 
the river and above our heads on the mountain, 
there came a terrific scream, which died out in a 
sort of moan. I confess that from that moment 



Page Four 



iE'f)t CoQege Greetings; 



the prickles on my spine did not disappear for several 
days. Again and again the screech was sent up, 
ripping the still air and the nerves of some of us. 
Our guide, with a huge puff of smoke from his pipe, 
grunted, "Huh, mountain lion," and went on looking 
at the fire. One of the hunters reached for his gun 
and began to clean it. It was a good big one — a 
Winchester 30-30, and I looked upon the perform- 
ance with approval. 

For awhile, the lion seemed to be going away 
from us, but after a long silence, we heard him again 
across the river, so close that I held my breath and 
edged nearer into the blaze lighted circle. The 
guide assured us that there was no danger as long 
as we kept up a good fire. We finally got up cour- 
age to go to bed, and I know that I saw that lion, 
grown to the proportions of the king of beasts, stick 
his head under my tent flap and sniff around a dozen 
times. In spite of nervousness, I dropped off to 
sleep and slept soundly until awakened by the report 
of the big rifle, and then another and another. I 
wasted no time in crawling out and found camp in 
a great hubbub and stir. There stretched out, not 
ten feet from our fire, lay a fine specimen of the 
mountain lion, though not nearly so large as I had 
imagined. The gun enthusiasts were almost beside 
themselves with glory, and the last remark I heard 
that night was, "well, you folks won't need to get 
up early to fish — we'll just have a little lion steak!" 
The fact of the matter is, that we had bacon and 
flap jacks for breakfast. 

PERIL HESS, '15. 



Page F 



Clje CoHese (Greetings! 



ALASTOR 

"Alastor," the spirit of Solitude, is an idealized 
character, endowed with splendid capabilities. His 
early training, his mentality, all his endowments, 
have equipped him for the accomplishment of great 
deeds — deeds that might make him a great Server of 
mankind. Yet he does not measure up to his oppor- 
tunities. Self-satisfied, in that he believes his quest 
to be the all important issue, selfish in that he will 
not give freely of himself to those he passes, he 
brings his work to no fruition to himself or to man- 
kind. Instead of making his splendid store of 
knowledge the sure foundation for a Wisdom that 
shall express itself in terms of sympathy with human- 
ity, that shall accomplish what knowledge alone 
never could, he turned to the line of least resistance. 
A splendid vision it was that he sought; no mean 
thing, it is true, but nevertheless it was the easy 
thing for him to do, the thing that was in perfect 
accord with his desires. Until the time of the 
appearance of the vision, has been a period of prep- 
aration. Alastor has received his heritage from the 
world of knowledge, his mind has developed nor- 
mally, broadly. His has been no narrow, cramped 
training. 

What shall be the next line of activity? At this 
moment, the vision appears, in all its beauty and 
strength. All human calls he passes by unheeded. 
He hastens from remote corner to remote corner, 
unseeing, unfeeling. He terrifies little children; he 
piizzles women; he troubles maidens; but to all he 
turns unseeing eyes, unhearing ears. 

At last his journey is ended — the journey that has 
cost some suffering, that has involved dangers and 
hardships. And the result? A smiling death. 

Page Six 




tKfjE College (J^reetingsf 



That strange adjusting power we call Nemesis has 
paid him in the coin he has expended. He has not 
suffered greatly; he has not consciously sacrificed 
what he considered the vital relationships of life. 
To him there was joy in the mere pursuit. It is, 
therefore, fitting that death should come, not as a 
stern and unrelenting force, tearing him away from 
life, but as a messenger of peace, a welcome cessa- 
tion of activity. Through life he had given nothing; 
in death he received nothing. The terms of his life 
and the terms of his death are in perfect accord. 
An aesthetic self-indulgence did not enrich his exist- 
ence; rather it warped and limited the capabilities 
that had within themselves the opportunities and 
responsibilities of the greatest possible service to 
mankind. Death could bring no sting, for life had 
no stimulus of actuality. 

JANETTE POWELL. 

>? 
EVERYGIRL AND EXAMINATION WEEK 

Characters: Messenger, Everygirl, Final, English 
History, College Algebra, Vickerys, English I, Light 
Permission, Chemistry, Headache, French I, Sleep. 

Messenger: I pray you all give your audience 
and hear this matter with reverence, by figure a 
moral play; the summoning of Everygirl called it is, 
that of our work and striving shows how transitory 
it is anyway. This matter is wonderously precious, 
but the purpose of it is more gracious and sweet to 
bear away. The story says: Girls, in the begin- 
ning look well. Be ye never too gay. Ye think 
leisure in the beginning full sweet, which in the 
end causeth the soul to weep. Jest, jollity, pleasure, 
and play will fade from thee as flowers in May. 
For ye shall hear how the semester's ending calleth 

Page Seven 



^^ 



t!Df)e College (©reetingsf 




Everygirl to a general reckoning. Give audience 
and hear what we shall say. (Exit) 

(Everygirl enters slowly, carrying an armful of 
books, including College Algebra, English History, 
English I, French I, Chemistry, note books, pen- 
cils and rules. Slams them on desk, sits down and 
buries her face in her hands.) 

Enter Final. 

Final: Arouse ye, Everygirl. Why art thou 
wasting time? 

Everygirl: Why! Who art thou grim messen- 
ger.? 

Final: I am Final. I come from the faculty 
to bid you prepare — prepare for the final reckoning. 

Everygirl: Cannot the reckoning be postponed? 

Final: The time has come. 

Everygirl: But I am unready such reckoning to 
give. 

Final: The time has come. Make ready shortly. 

(Exit) 

Everygirl: Alas! I am sorely grieved. For 
though I mourn it availeth not. Time passes quickly 
and I am unprepared. To whom shall I first turn 
for aid? English History has formerly proved true. 
Would she could aid me now; there she comes. I 
vvHl make my complaint to her. 

(English History enters.) 

English History: Good-day, Everygirl. Why 
lookest thou so sad? 

Everygirl: I am in dire distress. 

English History: Tell me thy trouble. I will 
not forsake thee. 

Everygirl: Thanks, Kind Friend. If thou f ailest 
me my heart will surely break. 

English History: Speak out, sad one. Tell me 
my grief. 

iic Right 




tKJje CoUegc (greetingg 



Everygirl: Final has commanded me to make 
my reckoning- and I am unready far. Wilt thou go 
with me? 

English History: Gladly, if thou wilt quickly 
give me my dates. 

Everygirl: I will try (mumbling half aloud). 
Hastings 1492, Saxons 1066, Normans 449, Romans 
567, America 1453, Augustine 43, no 410. Oh, 
My! 

English History: Thou hast them so confused 
and I am weak without them. Still will I go, if 
thou hast a neat note book to support me. 

(Everygirl rummages among her belongings, 
drags forth a loose leaf note book, in which the 
leaves are half out and in a hopeless tangle; silently 
hands it over.) 

English History: (Looks at it silently, then turns 
quickly) 1 cannot go with thee. (Exit) 

Everygirl: Whither shall I flee, now that my 
History has forsaken me? Or (thoughtfully) have 
I forsaken her? (Sits down, fumbles among her 
books a while, then call) Where art thou, College 
Algebra ? 

(College Algebra enters.) 

College Algebra: Awaiting thy command. 
How can I best serve thee? 

Everygirl: (Arises, steps toward College Alge- 
bra) I have been commanded by grim Final, the 
faculty messenger, to give an immediate reckoning. 
Wilt thou help me settle my accounts? 

College Algebra: As far as I can but remember 
thou hast broken my binomial theorem. 

Everygirl: But canst thou not accompany me 
without it? 

College Algebra: Yes, if thou wilst hand me my 
crutch of Horner's Method. Is it not there with 



Synthetic Revision 



Page Nine 



tE^ije CoUege ^Ireetings 




Everygirl: (Walks to table, fumbles among 
papers and brings forth two broken rules.) Alas! 
Both are broken (covers her face with her hands). 

College Algebra: Do not despair. Call the 
carriage of determinants drawn by the steeds, Com- 
binations and Permutations. 

Everygirl (dejectedly) : It broke down with me 
yesterday. 

College Algebra: How about partial fractions? 

Everygirl: They are no longer partial; they are 
completely gone. 

College Algebra: I am too weak to aid thee. I 
must seek my repose (slowly and painfully moves 
away). But I will find English I and send her 
swiftly to you. 

Everygirl (thoughtful a while, then more lively) : 
Why haven't I thought of him before? Vickerys 
will help me while I wait for English I. (Walks 
down stage where she meets Vickerys, who is just 
entering.) 

Vickerys: With what can I serve you? Fresh 
oysters, hot chocolates, cold sundaes — 

Everygirl (Interrupts) : Several pounds of dates, 
,. lease. 

Vickerys: We have them not today. 

Everygirl : Hast thou a large cake of bluff, then ? 

Vickerys: No. Everyboy has bought the last. 

Everygirl : I must, at least, have a dish of warm 
brains served with some cool nerve sauce. 

Vickerys: Alas! Everyboy has taken them 
likewise. Could I serve thee with some mutton- 
head or — 

Everygirl (Interrupting) : I knew thou wouldst 
prove false. N o more of thee. (Wheels around 
sharply and walks back to table. Vickery goes off 
in opposite direction.) 

Everygirl (Sits down at table) : The suspense 

Page Ten 



tE'fit Codese Greetings! 



is worse than the most terrible realization, English 
I should be here ere now. (Turns her back to 
door by which English I is entering. Turns as 
English I speaks.) 

English I (With her hand to her back as if in 
pain) : College Algebra has told me all. Gladly 
will I accompany thee as soon as I am ready. Make 
haste to hand me my back themes. 

Everygirl: It is too late. They were all left 
behind on the hill of procrastination. 

English I: That's all right. Make me a brace 
from your punctuation rules. (Everygirl picks up 
rules and papers, handling them awkwardly.) 

English I (encouragingly) : There put the com- 
mas between the colons, and semi-colons — a dash 
there — enclose all in quotation marks. Now — 

Everygirl (Whose face has brightened up as she 
worked. Suddenly all goes to pieces in her hands) : 
It was in vain. I had them but knew not how to 
use them. 

English I (Hands still on back) : Yet will I go 
with thee, accompanied by a legion of clauses. 
What else do I need? 

Everygirl : But the clauses — 

English I: Are they not with thee? 

Everygirl: I thought all need of them was o'er 
and let them go. (English I, holding her back more 
tightly than ever, moves slowly away.) Oh, do not 
leave me, thou didst seem most loyal. 

Everygirl (Looking at her watch) : It is almost 
nine. I must get faithful Light Permission to aid me 
ere long. (Walks to edge of stage, returns accom- 
panied by Light Permission.) 

Light Permission: But the last time thou didst 
abuse my privileges. Thou didst read the Ladies' 
Home Journal and not thy text books. 

Page Elpven 




tKije CoUcge (Greetings; 



Everygirl: But not tonight. The need is press- 
ing. Thou must aid me. 

Light Permission: Only as long as thou usest 
me aright. (Chemistry enters slowly from oppo- 
site side.) 

Everygirl (Still speaking to Light Permission and 
not noticing Chemistry) : I will treat thee fair. 

Light Permission: Then call me at 9:30. Until 
then, farewell. 

Everygirl (Noticing Chemistry, rushes to embrace 
her. Chemistry draws back.) 

Chemistry: Do not touch me. I am too dirty, 
far. 

Everygirl: Then didst thou not come to aid me 
in my sore distress? 

Chemistry: Distress? But I must hasten on. 
Thy laboratory work is too weak to move. I must 
needs attend her. 

Everygirl : But hear my tale of woe. 

Chemistry: I have not time. (Passes out oppo- 
site way from which she has entered. On way out 
bumps into Headache, They glare at each other, 
then pass on.) 

(Headache walks over to table where Everygirl 
sits with her head buried in her arms, and touches 
her head.) 

Everygirl (Jumps up, pressing her hands to her 
temples, crying out) : Avount, grim specter. Now, 
of all times, why dost thou trouble me, stern Head- 
ache? 

Headache: My presence is the penalty of former 
carelessness and present care. My purpose is to 
warn. Work, but do not worry. I shall remain 
here until driven away by Rest or Sleep. 

(Headache sits down stiffly in chair slightly back 
of Everygirl. Remains motionless.) 

Everygirl (Holding her head) : All hope is o'er. 

Page Twelve 



Wiit CoUege ^reettnsst 



My head! My head! (her face brightening) Why, no! 
I had almost forgotten the one who will not forsake 
me at this trying hour. (Walks to one side calling) 
French !French! 

French (Enters gaily) : Bon jour, Mademoiselle. 

Everygirl: Hast thou heard of my distress? 
Wilt thou help me? 

French (Still merry and gay) : Distress? Why 
distress? I help thee? To be sure! 

Everygirl: But dost thou know that I have for- 
gotten thy conjugations and thy vocabularies? 
Dost thou not need them? 

French (Thoughtfully) : Were better to have, 
but if thou hast a ready wit we can dispense with 
them. 

Everygirl: Art thou sincere? My joy knows 
no bounds. But what is that I vaguely see approach- 
ing? (Sleep entering slowly and quietly.) 

Everygirl: I feel so queer. (Sits down at table, 
her head slowly begins to nod.) 

Sleep (Speaking softly) : Thou hast not sum- 
moned me, whom thou needst most. Yet I come 
unbidden (Catches sight of Headache — starts toward 
her. Headache flees). Dost thou not feel better 
now? 

Everygirl (Tries to arouse herself) : But hast 
thou not heard? I must — I must — not — (Her 
head falls over; she sleeps.) 

Sleep (Passing her hands over Everygirl's head) : 
Sleep on, Everygirl. 'Tis better. When thou 
awakest new hopes shall attend thee, protect thee 
from Headache and Dull Care. Sleep on. Sleep 
on. Erma Lytle Elliott, '14. 



Page Tliiili'cii 




Cfje CoHegE Greetings 



FacuWy Committee— Miss Weaver, Miss Tanner, Miss 
Neville. 

Editor -Lois M. Coultas 

Associate Editors — Elizabeth Tendick, Letta Irwin, Mary 
Lawson. 

Business Managers— Elizabeth Dunbar, Emily Jane Allan 
Helena Munson 



The whole world, if we please, may be divided 
into two classes of people — those with initiative and 
those without it. Beyond all doubt, students fall 
decidedly in one or the other of these classes. In 
mass meetings, in society, in Y. W., in class, we 
find these two divisions, one striving to rise and get 
a little farther out of the old ruts, and retarded by 
the other, either through jealousy, indifference, or 
laziness, seldom by any sheer lack of the qualities 
that make for purposeful doing. 

Initiative does not necessarily mean that a student 
must start something new — it means that if the other 
person has started the new thing, she must grasp 
the idea and push it forward with a will. Jealousy 
is one of the earmarks of the little mind, and the 
student that lets this enter into her actions has not 
only lowered herself, but she has slipped a backward 
cog into the fly-wheel, and if friction is not the least 
result, stoppage ensues. 

Laziness and indifference are boon companions 
in the character of the student that does not exert 
herself in activities outside herself. Occasionally, 
we hear timidity offered as a reason for inaction. 
The student that really suffers from this, usually 
realizes the necessity of getting over it and is thus 
her own best help. More often, however, timidity 
is an excuse that offers an easy way out, whereas 
indifference and laziness are the real causes. To 
say anything about either of these two things is diffi- 

Page Fourteen 



^f)t College (Greetings 




cult — so much has already been said, so familiar 
are we all with these phases of inaction. If we can 
conquer our indifference, even though our interest 
be at first faint, we can make our interest overcome 
our laziness. Usually laziness means lack of inter- 
est, and lack of interest means lack of information 
and thought. The more we learn, the more we 
enter into every interest that infringes on our con- 
sciousness, the more shall we be under the necessity 
of shaking off our slothfulness, of doing something, 
of having individual opinions, and the nearer shall 
we come to entering the class of the initiative. 

The Seniors from the special department received 
their classification as Seniors, the first week in Feb- 
ruary. The graduating class is now augmented to 
twenty-eight. The Home Economics Department, 
as usual, supplied the largest number of graduates. 

LOCAL CALENDAR 

Jan. 12. President Marker preached today in 
the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Springfield, 
111. 

Jan. 13. Dr. Marker left for Lincoln, Neb., to 
attend a meeting of the College Presidents' Asso- 
ciation. 

Miss Weaver's Monday morning talk, which was 
unusually inspiring, presented in a sympathetic way 
some of the ideals that will help us in finishing this 
year's race. 

Jan. 14. Owing to the illness of the Dean, morn- 
ing chapel services were conducted by Miss Neville. 

Jan. 15. Announcement was made of several 
new courses offered by the English Department, 
among which are classes in the study of Browning, 
Ruskin and Carlyle, and American Literature. 

Page Fifteen 



W^^t CoUese ^rtttinqsi 



Jan. 16. The faculty and students were happy 
to learn of Dr. Marker's election as President of the 
Association of Secondary Schools and Colleges of the 
M. E. Church. 

Jan. 17. In an appeal to the members of the 
Mission Study Classes, Dean Weaver touchingly 
presented some conditions among the unfortunate of 
Jacksonville. 

Jan, 18. The students were entertained by the 
faculty and Mrs. Marker at a delightfully informal 
progressive dinner. Groups were directed from 
room to room by clever signs, to find everywhere 
a cordial welcome and a jolly good fellowship. The 
gay march of progression took us all over the build- 
ings, up and down stairs, from alcove to society 
halls, group passing group, dignified senior elbowing 
first year prep in a joyous comradery. The spirit 
of I. W. C. came very close to us all this night, all 
barriers were put down and hand touched hand in 
sympathetic concord. 

Miss Marshall entertained the Seniors at 4 o'clock 
tea. 

Jan. 19. Dr. Marker was able to be with us for 
Sunday chapel, but had to leave the city again later. 

Jan. 20. The first number on the Aritsts' Course 
since the holidays, Mme. Nine Dimitrieff. 

Jan. 21. Chapel services were led by Miss Cow- 
gill. 

Jan. 22. New courses in Ornithology and 
Physiology were offered this morning. Miss Lucy 
Gillet, head of the Home Economics Department, 
has begun a series of papers to appear in the North- 
western Christian Advocate. 

Jan. 23. Director and Professor Swarthout gave 
a helpful analysis of their concert to be given on 
January 27. 

Page Sixteen 




tE^fje CoUese (Jlrcctings; 



Jan. 24. The Y. W. cabinet entertained at dinner 
by Dean Weaver. 

Jan. 25. Miss Mary Anderson "At Home" in the 
afternoon, receiving informally. 

Jan. 26. Y. W. led by Miss Berger. 

Jan. 27. The Swarthout recital given before an 
unusually large and appreciative audience. 

Jan. 28. Dr. Hanscher was again with us, pre- 
senting the new student volunteer movement for 
service anywhere, at home or abroad. 

The "irst of a series of free lectures at the City 
Library was given by Miss Neville, who presented 
"Egypt as It Is Today." 

Jan, 29, Semester examinations are given this 
week. 

Jan. 30. Dean Weaver has returned from a 
short absence. 

j£n. 31. Miss Neville entertains the Senior class 
at 6 o'clock dinner. 

Feb. 1. Mass meeting of Student Endowment 
Organization. 

Belles Lettres Society entertained by the president. 
Miss Allen. 

Feb. 2. Miss Kidder reads "Saul" in Y. W. 

Feb. 3. Another Artists' Course number, the 
Pasmore Trio. 

Feb. 4. An event of great interest to the house 
girls — we "changed tables" in the dining room. 

Feb. 5. A Y. W. business meeting. 

Feb. 6. Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

Feb. 7. Phi Nu sleigh ride. 

Public recital by first year Expression students. 

Feb. 8. Belles Lettres candy sale. 

The Endowment Moving Picture Show. 

Page Seventeen 



^i)e CoUege ^xtttitiQi 




Feb. 9. The first afternoon meeting of Y. W. 

Feb. 10. Miss Kidder read "The Passing of the 
Third Floor Back." 

Feb. 11. Miss Gillet talked at the Public Library 
in the afternoon on "How to Prepare the Meal." 

Miss Johnston, in the evening at the Library, gave 
a review and criticism of Barchester Towers. 

Feb. 12. The Expression Department gave a 
Lincoln program in Music Hall and served tea in 
the Expression Halls immediately after the program. 

Feb. 13. Belles Lettres entertained for Phi Nu 
in Belles Lettres Hall. 

Feb. 14. Dr. and Mrs. Harker entertained for 
the Seniors. 



ENDOWMENT STUNT 

An enthusiastic mass meeting of the students was 
held Saturday evening, February 1, in the Society 
Halls. Different girls, representing classes of '-85o, 
1875, 1913 and 1920, gave short talks, on the 
need of a college loyalty and enthusiasm, on the 
question of standardization for colleges, and on vhat 
college gives us and what we should give it in retirn. 
The chairman of the Endowment Committee, Helen 
Moore, gave a forceful talk on the spirit with whch 
we must work for our college, the divisions into 
which we fall — the indifferent girls, the effervesceit 
kind of girls, and the thoughtful girls, who use heal 
as well as heart in all they do. \ 

In conclusion she spoke especially of definite ways 
in which we show our love and loyalty for I, W C. 
If each girl, beginning with February 1, should give 
a nickel each day, Sunday excepted, by the close of 
school each girl would have saved five dollars. Five 

Page Eighteen 




Cfje CoUege ^reetingsi 



^^ 



dollars for the next two years each, plus ten dollars 
which each of us could easily get from our friends, 
would make twenty-five dollars apiece. Twenty- 
five dollars apiece for two hundred of us means 
five thousand dollars, which we have set as our aim. 
Plans were brought forward and discussed, but not 
much definite work was done, ls the meeting was 
primarily intended as a "pep" meeting, not for 
business alone. 



The Endowment Committee, having a surplus 
stock of enthusiasm, decided upon giving a moving 
picture show Saturday evening as a legitimate and 
sensible pathway along which to discharge their 
overflow of feeling. The first number on their pro- 
gram was "Everybody's Doing it," by an orchestra 
of thirteen pieces. Anne Heist, as band mas- 
ter achieved instantaneous approval, although it was 
her first appearance in this role. The entire orches- 
tra, however, acquitted themselves well, and showed 
a familiarity with the various instruments that pre- 
supposed to many in the audience an acquaintance 
with them of longer than three days. The first of 
the reels was an one-act drama, showing how a 
child is often the means of re-uniting a parted hus- 
band and wife. Helen Moore and Letta Irwin, as 
husband and wife, acted their parts admirably. The 
Mechanical Dolls was a short interlude between the 
two reels. The machine-like precision of the move- 
ments of the dolls brought hearty applause from the 
audience. The dolls, Madeline McDaniels, Mildred 
Barton and Mary Watson, had been trained by 
Louise Hughes. The last reel was "A Complicated 
Affair" and proved the hit of the evening. Mona 
Summers played the part of heroine driven to the 
comical necessity of converting each suitor in turn 

Page Nineteen 




tlDlje CoHege (Hreetingsi 



into some innocent looking piece of furniture to 
make way for the courting of his successor. The 
receipts for the evening were ^ 15.90. 



DAY OF PRAYER 

Thursday, February 6, was the Day of Prayer for 
Colleges, a day that in our lives here should and 
does mean much to the students. The first two 
class hours were observed in the morning, and at 
10 o'clock the different classes held short meetings, 
in which they discussed various phases of the work 
for Christ. 

Bishop Charles Smith, of St. Louis, gave the 
morning address. He spoke of the necessity of 
building up Christian characters. The first great 
requisite for every Christian is an overflowing love, 
a love that expresses itself in faith, virtue, knowl- 
edge, temperance, patience, godliness, brotherly 
kindness, and charity. If our characters are especi- 
ally weak in any one of these lines, it is just here 
that we must center our attention. If we feel that 
we are all right in one, we must be sure that we 
are not signally failing in another direction. His 
message was singularly inspiring. His strong per- 
sonality and his deep conviction of the truths he 
spoke made us glad that we could have him with 
us on this day. 

In the afternoon Dr. Harker, the faculty and the 
students met in the old chapel for an hour, which, 
as is customary here on the Day of Prayer, was spent 
in song, in prayer, and in short remarks by girls and 
faculty upon what our spiritual life has meant to 
us, and what we feel is true about all spiritual living, 
and the necessity we are all under of living better 
and higher lives each year. 

Page Twenty 




®fte CoUcge ^reetrngaf 




departments 



EXPRESSION NOTES 

February 10 Miss Amanda Kidder read Jerome K. 
Jerome's "Passing of the Third Floor Back." The 
message of the drama, together with the opportunity 
for strong impersonation, made the reading one of 
the strongest Miss Kidder has ever given here. The 
subtle change that creeps over each of the charac- 
ters was managed so skillfully as to leave no feeling 
of improbability of its occurrance. The recital was 
a rare treat and gave us but further proof of Miss 
Kidder's ability to present worth while truths in a 
most pleasing and artistic manner. 

A program consisting of Lincoln stories was given 
February 12. After the recital tea was served in 
the Expression Hall, which was suitably decorated 
for the occasion. 

Several afternoon recitals by first and second 
year students were given during the month of Jan- 
uary. 

HOME ECONOMICS NOTES 

Additional reasons have appeared recently for our 
reading the Northwestern Christian Advocate, since 
one of our faculty members has been contributing 
a series of interesting and instructive articles on 
"The House Beautiful in Which We Live." That 
appreciation of the ability of Miss Gillett is by no 
means limited to ourselves is evidenced by 
the request for these contributions from her and we 
are very proud of her successful use of the oppor- 

Page Twenty-one 



^^ 



Cije CoUege (JlreetingS 




tunity for addressing the large number of Advocate 
readers. 

Besides the logical treatment of valuable material, 
she has given to the articles a simple, concrete 
expression in an extremely interesting style. 

Still others are calling for the message which Miss 
Gillett has to present, and during the past month 
she has given, before clubs of Jacksonville women, 
two lectures and two demonstrations. We are all 
glad for the honors which have come to her, as well 
as for the sincere regard which the Jacksonville 
public has expressed for her. 

Miss Anna Barrows of Teachers' College, Colum- 
bia University, delivered an address on "The High 
Cost of Living" before the Woman's Club of Jack- 
sonville on February 7. Miss Barrow's reputation 
in Household Science is so wide that the opportunity 
of hearing her explanation of woman's part in this 
problem was one which was embraced by a large 
number of students in the Home Economics Depart- 
ment. 

Practice Teaching Classes in both cooking and 
sewing have been started by the second year class, 
with children from town for students. The plan 
being used includes, not teaching alone, but criticism 
of methods used and possible solutions for the prob- 
lems which arise. 

The one most prominent characteristic of science 
has often been said to be its uncertainty. Today we 
are taught to accept as truth what tomorrow is 
proven to be entirely wrong. This seems to have 
been true in the case of Miss Ferrol's malady. We 
hesitate to mention any title, and yet at the same 
time we would like to suggest that our algebraic 
friend "X" would seem an appropriate one. In 
spite of all the uncertainty we shall be glad to wel- 
come her return. 



Page Twenty-two 





Cfje College Greetings; 

MUSIC NOTES 

Mme. Nina Dimitrieff, soprano, appeared in recital 
on the evening of January 20. The program of 
voice was one of the best ever heard in Jackson- 
ville. Mme. Dimitrieff is a native of Russia and 
is making a tour of the large cities of the United 
States. 

Her voice is of beautiful quality, wide in range, 
sympathetic and, in fact, possesses all the character- 
istics which go to round out the full artist. Not only 
was her singing superb, but she possesses a strong 
and pleasing personality. 

Part I and Part III of her program were com- 
posed of Russian selections. 

On the evening of January 2 7 Director and Asso- 
ciate Director Swarthout appeared for the second 
time in joint program. 

In these recitals they depart from the usual cus- 
tom of giving a group of small numbers, and confine 
themselves to a program of three numbers, as is 
the custom in the most important musical centers. 
Their numbers are, however, among the most diffi- 
cult compositions known. Each num^ber required 
from twenty to thirty-five minutes of continuous 
playing, so that the program equalled in length one 
composed of smaller numbers. 

The arrangement of the program showed three 
distinct schools of music. In the first selection for 
piano and violin the French school was exemplified. 
In the second, the Scandinavian, and in the piano 
number the Russian school. 

In the first number, by Saint Saens, ample oppor- 
tunity was given for these artists to display their 
wonderful ensemble work. In the second number, 
by Sinding, Director Swarthout proved to the appre- 

Page Twenty-three 




(IDlje CoUege (^reetingg 



ciative audience his mastery of one of the most 
(.li'fficult vioHn numbers. In the last number, the 
Concerto in B-flat minor, by Tschaikowsky, Mr, 
Donald Swarthout displayed to greater advantage 
than ever before, his wonderful technique and inter- 
pretation. 

Another addition to our "Hall of Fame" has been 
made. An autograph photograph of Harrison Wild 
has been received and placed in Music Hall. 

Miss Nicholson gave her recital on the evening of 
February 24. Miss Nicholson was greeted by an 
appreciative audience, and, although much was 
expected of her, she more than fulfilled all expecta- 
tions. She gave the following program: 

Bach — Bouree, Prelude and Fugue in F minor, 

d'Albert — Allemande, Gavotte, Musette. 

Chopin — Nocturne in F major. Etude G-flat, Bal- 
lade A-flat. 

Richard Strauss — Intermezzo, Traumerei 

Debussy — Arabesque, La Sairee dans Grenade. 

Schiitt — Valse Parisienne. 



ART NOTES 

Miss Knopf is honored in having two pictures 
hung at the annual Exhibition of Works by Chicago 
Artists now being held at the Chicago Art Institute, 
The pictures stay on exhibition through the month 
of February. This is the fifth successive year that 
Miss Knopf has been represented in this particular 
exhibition. 

Mary Louise Dickie and Elsinore Girton are tak- 
ing work in the Art Department this semester. 

The First Year Design Class has made some very 
attractive posters which are to be developed for 
the Y. W. C. A. meetings. 

i'age Twenty-four 




^lie CoUege Greetings! 



Lorado Taft, who gave us the first lecture on our 
Artists' Course, has been commissioned to create 
the Great Fountain of Time to stand at the western 
terminus of the Midway Plaisance, in Chicago. The 
commission is one of the most important events in 
the history of modern art, and is the direct outcome 
of the Ferguson bequest, which brings with it an 
annual income of $30,000. Mr. Taft was given 
five years to complete the Fountain of Time in the 
heroic proportions which are necessary for such an 
important situation, and to be in harmony with the 
plans for the complete beautification of the Midway. 



SOCIETY NOTES 

Phi Nu is glad to announce that Mr. Lawrence Y. 
Sherman of Springfield has given us a good start 
in the New Year by a gift of twenty-five dollars. 
His wife was formerly a Phi Nu and on account of 
her love for the society he has always felt interested. 

As everyone was occupied with extra cares and 
worries during the last week of January, our presi- 
dent considerately relieved us of a regular program 
and gave us, instead, a most interesting description 
of her trip to Alaska, She showed us her collection 
of views, pressed flowers and several characteristic 
tokens from the land of the Midnight Sun. 

Immediately after the semester examinations we 
were forced to give up both our chaplain, Lena 
Gumerson, and our corresponding secretary, Irene 
Crum. Lena was called home on account of her 
mother's illness and Irene found it necessary to leave 
school for the sake of her own health. We are, 
indeed, sorry to lose these girls, and Phi Nu will miss 
them sorely. 

Last Friday night, February 7, as many of the 

Page Twenty-five 



tKije College (Greetings 




Society as could go, went on a bob-sled ride out to 
Miss Daisy Coons', five miles east of town. Miss 
Coons was a former student here and a Phi Nu. 
Every one there reports a most delightful time. Big 
open fires greeted them hospitably, hot soup supplied 
a very particular want and the piano was worked 
over time. Flashlight pictures were taken to be 
kept as unnecessary reminders of the happy event. 
Mr. and Mrs. Coons aided their daughter in making 
the girls have a jolly, informal evening, and we 
most heartily appreciate their success. 

Work has begun on the Phi Nu play, "Cupid at 
the Varsity," which will b.e given Monday evening, 
March 3. 



Blessings never come singly, it is said, and it is 
also true of society stunts at I. W. C. This year 
they all come by fours, as if in deference to the old 
belief of "the more the merrier." Belles Lettres led 
the way with the first of the four candy sales. Not 
only were the candy makers happy, as the rapid 
disappearance of the candy paid tribute to their 
ability, but the society treasurer was also made happy 
as the receipts of the evening were handed over to 
her. 

Miss Allen, president of Belles Lettres, was "At 
Home" to the girls in their hall Saturday evening, 
February 1. It was an especially happy choice of 
evening. Coming as it did, just at the close of the 
semester, it became really a post-examination jubi- 
lee. The girls spent a pleasant half hour over their 
needlework, laying it aside as they were served with 
ice cream and cake by the Academy girls, who 
charmingly assisted the hostess. Lois Coultas and 
Letta Irwin presided over the coffee cups. Later 

Page Twenty-six 




tEfje College ^reetingsf 



in the evening Helen Jones sang charming little 
lullabies and other songs in keeping with the pleasant 
atmosphere of happy comradeship. Mona Summers 
good-naturedly responded to the demands of the 
girls for the old favorites among her readings and 
surprised and delighted us all by introducing us to 
some new numbers of her repertoire. Essie Sum- 
mers, one of our new girls this year, read Nixie of 
the Neighborhood. A moving picture show, pre- 
sented by Misses Geitz, Coultas and Irwin, was 
very clever and was thoroughly enjoyed. We were 
all happy in having the Dean with us for a part of 
the evening, and regretted that other engagements 
made it impossible for her to stay with us longer. 

The Lambda Alpha Mu Society entertained its 
new members in Expression Hall Saturday evening, 
February 1. The hall had been transformed with 
pillows, rockers and screens into a cozy den. With 
music and really good fun the time passed so swiftly 
that we had scarcely time to finish the elaborate 
refreshments which had been prepared. 

The date, February 1 7, was set at a recent meet- 
ing for the annual banquet. March 18 was also 
decided upon as the date for the open meeting to 
be held in Music Hall. 

We are now beginning our regular series of pro- 
grams. Immigration will be considered during this 
month and we have made plans to have at the last 
meeting of the month an outside speaker to give 
us a broader outlook on the subject. With this 
preparation we expect to appreciate thoroughly Dr. 
Steiner's lecture. 

The Theta Sigma Society has ordered its pins and 
hopes to have them now in a short time. Society 
stationery was also ordered. 

Page Twenty-sercii 




Ki)t CoUege Creetingjf 



On January 28 a musical program was given. 
Miss Nicholson kindly granted us the use of her 
studio for this meeting and we were pleased to have 
her for our guest. After the program there was a 
short business session, at which Ida Belle Towsley 
was elected as our new secretary. 

We are glad to welcome a new member into our 
society, Louise Hughes, who was initiated Feb. 11. 

Washington seemed more of a reality to us after 
the meeting on the 18. After the story entitled "A 
Modern Washington," by Harriet Rucker and the 
piano solo by May Bigger, "Our Hero" was effect- 
ively discussed by Madeline McDaniels. At the close 
of the program the national song was substituted for 
the regular society song. 

Theta Sigma has pledged one hundred dollars to 
the Endowment Fund. 



CLASS FUNCTIONS 

Pleasurable thrills of anticipation were in the 
hearts of each and every Senior on the evening of 
January 31, as they made their way to Miss Neville's 
room, for she was "At Home" to them on that even- 
ing, and all of them knew from past experience what 
enjoyment an hour with their class officer meant. 
Greetings were hardly over when the dinner hour 
arrived and at sight of the dainty, hand-painted 
place cards, with a "piece of poetry" inside for every 
girl, tongues were silenced for a moment and all 
attention was given to the cards. Mrs. Harker, Miss 
Cowgill and Miss Weaver were the only guests 
besides the class. Such a good time was enjoyed 
by all that the hours slipped by unnoticed and even 
after the last good-byes were said the class gathered 
around Miss Neville for just a few minutes longer, 

Page Twenty-eight 



tlTfje CoUese Greetings: 




as though some magic charm kept them within her 
threshold. 

On the evening of February 14, President and 
Mrs. Harker entertained the Seniors and their class 
officers and the heads of departments at an elabor- 
ate 6 o'clock dinner. The parlors were beautifully 
decorated in keeping with St. Valentine's Day, the 
color scheme being pink and white. At the con- 
clusion of the dinner Mrs. Hartmann and Miss Miller 
sang several beautiful duets and Miss Parsons gave 
some delightful readings, all of which were very 
much enjoyed by the guests. An informal social 
time followed and the guests left with great reluc- 
tance, declaring that the pleasure of the realization 
far exceeded that of the anticipation and praising 
President and Mrs. Harker as the most successful 
and gracious of hosts and hostesses. 

CLASS STUNTS 

The Junior and Senior Classes availed themselves 
of the opportunity for a bob-sled ride during the 
snowfall, in the early part of February. A four- 
horse bob-sled drew up before the college one after- 
noon and a few minutes later was filled with girls. 
Miss Johnston, the Junior class officer, was with 
us, and led in the singing of songs appropriate to 
the occasion with great gusto. Just before the 
return to the college home a halt was called at 
"Vick's" and the program changed to hot chocolate, 
cream of tomato and tomato bouillon. The fresh 
air and bracing cold had brought rosy cheeks and 
happy spirits to all of us, as our appearance in the 
dining room a little later in the evening testified. 



P»ge Twenty-nine 



tSTije College Creetingss 



S^ 



WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY 
The 22nd of February is a half holiday long 
looked forward to and always thoroughly enjoyed 
by all. This year, as the students entered in cos- 
tume, the dining room was unusually attractive. By 
arrangement of red, white and blue candles and 
shades on the tables, the entire room represented one 
big flag, flanked on all sides by smaller emblems of 
our nation. After dinner the Lady Washingtons 
took the arms of the George Washingtons for the 
grand march, which ended at Concert Hall, where 
the stage was patriotically decorated. Here a 
charming program was given by the first 
year expression students, assisted by a few from the 
School of Music. Miles Standish, always so loved, 
because it is so real, was artistically presented, and 
the music was in sympathetic spirit. 



PASMORE TRIO 

The third musical number of the Artists' Course 
appeared Monday evening, February 3. The Pas- 
more Trio, composed of violinist, pianist and 'cellist, 
gave a very artistic and pleasing program. Owing 
to illness Miss Dorothy Pasmore, 'cellist, was unable 
to appear and her place in the trio was taken by 
Miss Vera Poppe of London. The program was 
as follows: 

Trio in D Minor, Opus 49 Mendelssohn 

(Four movements) 

'Cello solo — 
Hungarian Fantasy David Popper 

Piano solos — 

Nocturnette from Carnaval Mignon Schutt 

Waltz in E minor Chopin 

Violin solos — 

Bye Baby Bunting H. B. Pasmore 

Palonaise Brilliante Wieniawski 

Trio, Four Episodes (Impression Pictures) Opus 

72 Schutt 

(Four movements) 

Page Thirty 



LU Clje CoUcse Greetings! ||^ 



ALUMNAE NOTES 

Recent letters from alumnae and former students 
have brought interesting bits of news. It would 
seem that next to Illinois there are more I. W. C. 
alumnae in California than in any other state. 

Mrs. S. W. Haskett of Ukiah, California, writes of 
her College days in early fifties, when as Miranda 
Barnes, daughter of Dr. T. L. Barnes of Carthage, 
Illinois, she enrolled in the new school. After leav- 
ing school she was married in 1854 and went, with 
her husband, across the plains to California, where 
she has resided ever since. 

Miss Mary E. Terrill, class of '57, of Holden, 
Missouri, spends about half of the year in California, 
returning east in May. This winter she is in Glen- 
dora, where Mrs. Carl Gatton, class of '64, also 
makes her home. 

Julia Prentice, wife of Dr. Charles D. Warden, 
attended college during President De Motte's admin- 
istration. From her home, 127 South Broadway, 
Los Angeles, she writes of the happy ten years spent 
there, during which time her son and daughter have 
completed their education, have married and they 
also have their homes in this Paradise of the Western 
Coast. 

The class of 1854 had eighteen members, young 
women with strength of character and forcefulness, 
which passing years developed. Two members of 
this class reside in Jacksonville, Mrs. Elvira Gage 
Brock and Mrs. Eliza Trotter Caldwell, both loyal, 
generous alumnae. 

Harriet Cliffe Kitchell is living in Olney, Illinois, 
since the death of her husband, Col. Edward Kitchell. 
She has been an inspiration, not only to her children 
and grandchildren, but to the higher life of the com- 

Page Thirty-one 




Wfit College ^reettng£( 




munity. She has given much help, especially in 
securing and maintaining the city library. Clara 
Ibbetson Weer is living with her daughter and grand- 
children in Denver, but she makes frequent visits 
in Illinois and with unabated interest watches the 
advancement of her Alma Mater. 

Mrs. Tempe Short Perley has, for several years 
made her home abroad in Paris, and now with her 
daughter in Darmstadt, Germany. Mrs. Perley's 
book, "From Timber to Town," has recently fur- 
nished the readings in a program given in Pleasant 
Plains, where effort is being made to build a new 
church, a memorial to Peter Cartwright, whose home 
was in this pretty village and whose grave is under 
the trees in the quiet hillside cemetery there. Under 
the name of Paul Wheelwright Mrs. Perley intro- 
duces this strong character into her story of pioneer 
life. 

A year ago Mrs. Georgiana Watts Wilson of Valen- 
cia, Kansas, and her former school-mate, Mrs. Louisa 
Arenz Rhea, spent some months together in Florida, 
where, among other places, they visited lovely Sea 
Breeze, founded, planted and builded by their class- 
mate, Mrs. Helen Wilmans Post. The long avenues, 
stately and beautiful with palms, magnolias and urns 
of blooming plants and ferns gave evidence of the 
fine taste in the constructive power of Mrs. Post, who 
had looked forward to still greater development 
until the tropical growth and architectural perfection 
would make the place known as "The City Beauti- 
ful." Mrs. Post's daughter received her mother's 
friends most cordially and presented them with sev- 
eral volumes of her books. 

Mrs. Sarah Spruance Harrison, since the death of 
her husband, Mr. Gooding Harrison, makes her home 
at 525 Pasadena Avenue, Pasadena, California. 

Page Thirty-two 




tlDfje College (jlreetingsi 



Mrs. Anna Martin Hall is living in St. Paul, 617 
Goodrick Avenue. Mrs. Melinda Wilhoit Jackson's 
place of residence is Avalon Place, Valencia, Kansas. 

The stars of coronation stand before the names 
of Amanda Becraft, Mary Dickson McKain, Mary 
Foreman Eades, Sarah J. Gass, Hannah Cavanaugh 
Van Eaton, Emma Truitt Scripps, Helen Wilmans 
Post. 

The magazine section of the Record-Herald, 
Republican and other metropolitan papers of this 
class recently carried a delightful short story from 
the pen of Miss Anne Hinrlchsen of Alexander. This 
feature of about twelve of the leading papers of the 
United States has a total circulation of something 
over 2,000,000 each Sunday. It was a fine compli- 
ment to Miss Hinrichsen as a writer of short stories 
to have such a wide circle of readers, and it was 
entirely merited, because Miss Hinrichsen has rare 
talent for this line of literary work. I. W. C. is 
proud to claim Miss Hinrichsen as one of her former 
graduates. 



EXCHANGES 

The "Scattered Family" notes of the Frances 
Shimer Record speak well for the way in which 
the school keeps in touch with its alumnae and 
former members. 

We received the first number of the I. C. M. Vivo 
during the holidays and are glad to extend our 
sincerest congratulations to its editorial staff. For 
a first number, the paper is unusually good. The 
cover is attractive and the paper and print are of 
such a quality that it is a genuine pleasure to call 
attention to the fact. 

Page Thirty-three 




^tlt College ^reetinss^ 



The Moccassin Quarterly from Stanley Hall is a 
new exchange for us. The review of Current Events 
is an especially good idea. 

The College Rambler and the Nautilus are among 
the most welcome of our exchanges. The print of 
the High School in a recent number of the Nautilus 
is very good. 

In St. Mary's Chimes we make especial mention 
of the illustrations and poetry. 

The Earlhanite comes to us, an unusually neat 
paper with uniform pages and clear print. 

The Blackburnian, in its last issue has a very 
good story, "Betty — The Bearer of Light." We 
suggest that the joke section be condensed and more 
real news inserted. 

"Don't ask a man if he has been through college; 
ask if a collge has been through him; if he's a walking 
university. " — Carthage Collegian. 

Y. W. C. A. 

The devotional services have been unusually inter- 
esting and helpful this month. We have been espe- 
cially glad to hear Miss Kidder read Browning's Saul, 
and Miss Berger in a simple, direct talk on what the 
Association means to girls and women, not only in 
college, but also in the home and in the business 
life. In the meetings that are thrown open to all 
present, we are glad to see an increasing number 
take part. Many questions of vital interest to all 
are discussed and are responded to readily, making 
them very helpful. In the New Year's meeting, led 
by Verna Pierce and in a meeting whose topic was 
the ideal woman, led by Elizabeth Tohill, so many 
different viewpoints were given by various students 
as to make the discussion thoroughly worth while 

Page Thirty-four 




IB^ije CoUege Greetings; 




and enthusiastic. On January 19, an interesting 
report was given of the student convention that met 
in Bloomington just before the holidays. The dele- 
gates from here were Elizabeth Dunbar, Jess Camp- 
bell, Flossie Fletcher and Lena Gumerson. 

Several of the Mission Study Classes, that are 
taking up some practical work, in home missions, are 
especially occupied just now in helping refill the 
"Loan Chest" of the City Board of Charities. 

In preparation for the Day of Prayer the Y. W. 
C. A. conducted morning watch meetings. For sev- 
eral days the house girls met by corridors for a few 
minutes after the rising bell, coming together in a 
personal way that was very helpful. 

The Y. W. C. A, cabinet was entertained at dinner 
on January 24 by Miss Weaver. Small tables were 
arranged in her own rooms and everything was con- 
ducted in a charming way. After dinner, several 
practical problems of the Association were intimately 
discussed. 

The most satisfactory business meeting of the 
year was held on the evening of February 5. The 
members were made to feel that the entire responsi- 
bility did not lie with the cabinet and that matters 
of general concern should be decided by the Associa- 
tion as a whole. After a lively debate it was decided 
to change the time of meeting from Sunday evening 
to Sunday afternoon. So far the change has proved 
very successful, not only from the standpoint of 
numbers, but also of interest. 

Financial report follows: 



Page Thirty-fiTC 



tlTfje CoUese ^ttttinqi 



Financial Report for Cabinet Year 1912-1913 

Cash brought forward $ 27.64 

Pie Sales 1 3.25 

Sandwich sales 14.30 

May breakfast 29.55 

Y. W breakfast 1 2.00 

Bazaar 79.05 

County fair 50.00 

Calendars 48.00 

Systematic giving 123.76 

Dues 66.50 

Total $464.05 

Scholarship (on principal) $1 50.00 

Interest on scholarship 43.75 

Party 5.60 

Geneva 75.00 

Literature 12.70 

Systematic giving cards 2.25 

Flowers 3.60 

Convention delegates' expenses 16.81 

State work 45.00 

South American work 15.00 

Japanese girl 20.00 



Total $404.71 

Balance 59.34 



Page Thirty-six 



UUIIIUIIHUIIUmlllimilllllllllllllllllUIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIHIIIHHHtllUIIUUIIUIIMIHIUIUHUIIUIIIIIIIIUIIIIIinHIIUUIMIIItUIIMUUIIUUIIIUIIIIIIIIUIIIIUUIIIIHIlira^^ 

I Classy Styles We will be pleased to show you our line 

3 

-W. T. REAUGH 

I Fashionable Footwear 

I For All Occasions 

I 33 South Side Square Jacksonville, 111. 



Senior: I thought I worked pretty hard on my 
Shakespeare today, but no evidence of it was visible 
in class. 

M. N. : Pardon me! But did you say you were 
taking Shakespeare? 

Senior: Why, yes. Why? 

M. N.: Well of all things. I had that when I 
was a Sophomore at High School. 



Otto Speith 
pboto iportralturc 



3 



Member Photographers Associaton of Illinois i 



The Watson Studio Southwest Corner Square | 

IHHmUIUnHIIUimUIIIUIUIHIIIHIHIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIUIHWIWUUIIIHUIUIIIIIIIIIUIIUUIWIUIUUIIlllllllllUlimUIIHIIWIIIHIIIIIIIIUIIIIIUnilUW 



»iiHiiimiiiHHmuiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiniiiiiiiniinuiiiMiiiiiiiiiinMiiiiiiiuiimiiiiiiiiiiMiMiiiiiiiiuiiimnii^ 



Miss S: Well E., what did you think of Mac- 
beth? 

Miss M: Oh! 1 thought it was a very pretty 
story. 

V. P. : Well, I thought and thought in my History 
exam., but I could not remember a thing about the 
Statue of Winchester. 

Miss X. : Are you referring to a legal enactment 
or a piece of sculpture? I am a little undecided as 
to which you mean. 

V. P.: Oh, dear! I suppose I said the wrong 
one. I never could see much difference anyway. 



iCOTRKLL & LE^ONARD 

I ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OF 

CAPS 

GOWNS and 
HOODS 

I To the American Colleges and Univer- 
1 sities from the Atlantic to the Pacific; 
I Class contracts a specialty. 




Our Prices Make Cleaning | 

a Necessity i 

Dry Cleaned and Pressed | 

Ladies' Lift | 

Skirts 50c I 

Jackets 50c i 

Waists 50c and up i 

lyongcoats i.oo | 

Dresses . . . . .1.00 and up | 

Sanitary Cleaning Shop i 

214 S. Sandy St, Both Phones 631 | 

We call for your goods i 

s 

1 



GO TO 

E>l:i.j:xle^« 

FOR 

Fresh Homemade Candies 

Hot and Cold Sodas 

All kinds of Fresh and 
Salted Nuts 

Bast state St. 

SlUIIIIIUIIIIIUIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIUIItllllllllllUIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIinillllllUUIIIIIIIIilUIIIHIIIIHIIUUtlllllllllUIUIinUIIIIUmNliUHIH 



Ladies' Fine Furs 
E. JENKIN 

15 West Side Square 



jiHiimtiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiMiiiiMiiniiniiiminMiiiiiiiniMnnnntiiMiuiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiMiiiiHiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiniiiiniitiitiiiiiiniinmiHiiiiiiiiHiiiiHHnniitiiiiii 



Dr. AivBYN IviNcoiyN Adams 

Oculist and Aarist 
to the State School for the Blind 

323 West State Street 



DR. KOPPE^RL 

Dentist 



326 West State St. 



Practice limited to diseases of the 
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 



Never Agaun 

Nora, the new maid, had been told to tell callers 
at the door that her mistress was not at home, says 
the Home Magazine. She did as she was told — with 
modifications. 

"Is Mrs. Blank at home? " asked the first to arrive. 

"For this wan toime," said Nora, "she ain't. But 
the saints help her if you ask again. I'll not loi 
twice for annybody livin'." 



Dr. R. R. BUCKTHORPE 
Dentist 

111. Phone, House 1054 

Office 750 
Bell Phone, Office 512 
Over Hatch Drug Store 

Jacksonville, 111. 



Thif Colley? Girl | 

B 
B 
B 

The Summer winds were kind to you I 
And left your face an Indian hue i 

But when your school work you plan I 
Of course you want to lose your tan, | 
So use YARA Greaseless Cream I 

25 cents the jar. | 

Armstrong's Drug Store S. W. Cor- I 

ner Square. i 



I DR. BYRON S. GAILEY 
i 

i EYB 

I EAR 

I NOSE 

1 THROAT 

s 
s 

I 340 West State Street 

s 

s 

s 
SinniitiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



DR. CARL E. BLACK | 

s 
Office— 349 E. State St. | 

Both Phones 85 I 

3 

Residence 1305 West State St. | 

Both Phones 285! 

Surgery — Passavant Memorial Hospital | 

and Our Saviours Hospital | 

Hospital Hours — 9:00 a. m. to 12 m. | 

Offire Hours — 1:30 to 4 p. m. Even- | 
ings and Sundays by appointment | 

s 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriniiiiiiinitir. 



GEO. T. DOUGLAS 
Fancy Groceries 



234 West State St. 



738 East North St. 



Mislaid the Pudding 

Dinner was late — but when the mistress started to 
make a mild remonstrance the new maid was on 
time with her excuse. 

"Sure," she said, with an irresistible Irish smile, 
as she placed the soup on the table," sure, I mislaid 
the pudding, and there 1 was hunting the house for 
it, and where would it be afther all but in the oven!" 




VERS 



I Jacksonville's Largest Mens' Store 

I 

I Pennants and Banners 

s 

I I. W. C. and Fraternity special designs 

I Mannish Cut Sweater Coats 

I Hand Bag's, Trunks 

i and Suits Cases 



GIRLS 

Our Baby Minnette Photo 
is just the thing 
you are looking for 
Call and see 

McDougall 

The West State Street 
Photogradhcr 



^inllllllllllUIIUIIUIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



PACIFIC 

Jacksonville's Best and most 
Popular 

HOTEL 

The Home of the Traveling Man 
Jno. B. Snell, Prop. 
Rates $a.25, $2.50, and $3.00 per day 
One Block West of Womans College 
Opposite Post Office 
Rooms with or without bath 
Local and Long Distance Telephone 

in every room. 



Ideal Bread | 

is better I 

i 

SO are the Cakes I 

g 
E 
S 
C 

1 
Z 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIirilllMlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltMllllllllii 



It is our business to get new goods for yon I 

We are never fully satisfied with our stock, but keep con- | 

stantly adding to it in order that no customer's needs may be over- I 

looked. Besides we believe it our duty to be forever watchful of I 

the markets and so secure "EVERYTHING" and "THE BEST" I 

Wc do not depend on onlyone line to make a profit— hence I 
can sell cheaper. I 

5 

A complete line of Drugs and Groceries I 

Phone. 800 K;OBEIEyTS BK.OS. Phone, 800 1 

Open every working day and night. | 
29 South Side Sq. | 



Miss McL. (10:05 p. m.) Well M., what is the 
matter with your light this evening? 

Miss A. (Looking thoughtfully at light, with aston- 
ishment in her tone) Why, it has been doing per- 
fectly all right all evening as far as I noticed. 



A Woman's Store I 

3 

3 

niled with the Luxuries and Necessities which appeai I 

to the heart of every woman i 

3 

Advanced Styles q\ I 

Moderate Prices I 

1 

We take a pride in proclaiming that we have the i 

lightest, brightest store in the State of Illinois, filled by I 

a rapidly changing stock of attractive merchandise, and | 

catering ever to the vi^ants of young women. I 

Coats Suits Dresses Costumes I 

Waists Gloves Hosiery Jewelry I 

Laces Ribbons Corsets Neckwear I 

Linens Notions Art Goods Handkerchiefs I 



^siss^^^ «sss5siS# msssj !ssisi$«sil «is^ Vs,. ,™.™^ .„ 

LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. 

"" '""'""""""""• iiii niMiiniiiiiniiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiii, iiiiiiiituiiiiiiiiiimiiiiii iiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiuiiiimiuiiimmiMil 



SKIRT BOXES 

ROCKERS. SCREENS, DESKS 

AND EED ROOM CURTAINS 

AT 

Ijohnson, Hackett &i Grnthrie 



His Education. 

An admiring friend was questioning the small boy 
as to his progress at school, and asked: 

"Fifth grade next year, Johnny? " 

"Yes, sir." 

"Ah, you'll be in fractions or decimals then, no 

doubt?" ^ ^ ^ ^ 

"No, sir; I'll be in beadwork and perforated 

squares." 



I KODAK FINISHING 
iVulcan Roll Films 
I Cameras from $2.00 up 

lEverything^ strictly first class 

I Claude B. Vail 

loswald's Drug Store 71 E. Side Sq. 



iFrank Elliott, Pres. Wtn. R. Routt, Vice-Pres 

£ C. A. Johnson, Vice-Pres. 

I J. Weir Elliott, Cashier 

s J. AUerton Palmer, Asst, Cashier 



ELLIOTT STATE BANK 

Jacksonville, 111. 



Capital 
Undivided Profits 

Frank Elliott 
J. Weir Elliott 
Wm. R. Routt 
Wm. S. Elloitt 



$150,000 
$ 15,000 

Frank R. Elliott 
John A. Bellatti 
C. A. Johnson 



Piepenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 
HERB TO PLEASE 



Candies 
Cookies 
Sandwiches 
Groceries 



Cakes 

Pies 

Pop on Ice 

California Fruits 



School Supplies 



Girls 

Don't forg-et our Advertisers 1 



fiintiiiiuiniiiiiiiiiuiiiiuuiMiiiiiiiiMiiiiMiiiiiiimHiHiiiiiiMMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNi iiHiMiiiiiiiiiiii uMiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiininiti 



HllimillHIIUIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIHtlHIMIIHIIIIIIinnilllllllllltllllllllllllllllllHiniltlllUIIIUIIIIIItllllllllllllllllUIIHIIIIIIIIIIMnillllWHIIIIIIHIUUIIUUIIUWW 

The bride s first choice for the home? | 

House Furnishings of Quality | 

from the I 

ANDRE & ANDRE I 

Our Special Room Furnishings will interest every student | 



A Blow to Sentiment 

"I cannot sing the old songs any more," said the 
man who had been chided for his silence. The sym- 
pathetic hostess turned to him with her gentle smile. 

"They are too full of memories and associations, 
I suppose," she said softly. 

"No," said the man, decidedly. "They are not 
full enough, that's the trouble. I can't remember 
the words, madam." 



■iOFFMAN'S 

Lunch Room 

Opposite Depots 

609-611 Eiast State Street 

Jacksonville, 111. 



Len G. Magill | 

s 
s 

Printer I 

s 

i 

East State Street 111. Phone 418 | 



Montgomery & Deppe 

E^VERYTHING IN DrY GoODS 

Well Lighted First Floor Cloak and Suit Room 

Agents for the Ladies Home Journal Patterns 
The new "Howd" front laced corsets 



ifliiiuuiiHiuiiiiiiiwiiiuuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiuiuiiuuiiiuuiiiiiiuiuiiiMiiiiuiiiuiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiuiiiuiiiiiiuiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiniuiiiiiuini^ 



'jiiiHiiiiiiiiiiMiiiHiitiUHniiiiiiuiiiiiiiiitiiitiiiniiiiHUiHiiiiiiiiHniiiiiiHHiiimiiiinttiMiimimiuiiniiiiiiinMniiiiiiniHiiniimmiiHiiiniuitiimniimtimiiiMiH 



College Jewel rv 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 

Chafing Dishes, Copper and Brass Goods 

Special Die Stationery 

21 South Side Square 



She Knew the Effect. 

One of the daughters of an American man of let- 
ters has literary gifts, and also a genius for critical 
biography. 

She had her first poem accepted by a magazine, 
and was exultant. 

"Now," she said, "there will be two conceited 
persons in the family." 



I CLOAMS. SutrS, FURSAMPM lLU NERt^ 

3 

jACKSOMViLLg, lu.» 

§ Kstablished 1890 

I Ivow Prices Square Dealing* 
I Keep us busy 



111. Phone 57 



Bell Phone 92 



Fresh Drugs, 
Fancy Goods 
Stationery 

THE 

I Badfler Drug Store 

2 doors West of Postoffice 

235 E. State Street 
^iHiuiiiiiHiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiniiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Florence Kirk King 
Hair Dresser 

Now prepared to manufact- 
ure French hair and combings 
into the 1912-1913 styles. 

Shampooing and scalp mas- 
sage by appointment at your 
residence. 

Illinois Phone 837 
Residence 503 West College Street 



If only you'll 

Remember Cherry's 

We'll be pleased, and we 
know positively that you'll 
find no cause for complaint. 

Our horses are safe; our equi- 
pages have character and in- 
dividuality, and our prices are 
most reasonable. 

Cherry's Livery 

Both Phones Jacksonville, 111. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiuiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiHiiumuiuiuiuHu 



•ifiiiiiiiimiiniiiiiMmiiiiiiiiitMiMMiiiHiiiiNiiitiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiimiiiminiiirinirniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiininniriiiiniMiiiMiiHniiuHHiiiuiiiumiiuminH^^ 




FALL Foot^vear 

OUR SPECIALTY 

Dress Slippers 
Street Shoes 
5?droom Slippers 

We Repair Shoes 



No Decoration Required 

It was Mr. Hobart's first experience with waffles, 
and he liked the taste of them. When he had been 
served twice, he called the waiter to him and spoke 
confidentially. 

"I'm from Pokeville," he said, "and we're plain 
folks there; don't care much for style, but we know 
good food when we get it. I want another plateful 
o' those cakes, but you tell the cook she needn't 
stop to put that fancy printing on 'em; just send 'em 
along plain." 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Fancy Bazaar 
and Millinery 

211 Weat state Street 



yAYLORJ 



Grocery 

A good place to trade 
221 West State Street 

UHllllllUIIIIHIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIINUIIimillllMllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



Illinois Phone 419 Bell Phone 417 

A. L. Bromley 

Ladies' Tailor 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and 
Repairing. Ladies' Man Tail- 
ored Suits to order. Remodeling 
of all kinds. Special rates to 
I. W. C. students. All work 
called for and delivered promptly 



GAY'S 

RELIABLE) 

HARDWARE 



llllllllllllllllllilUHIUIIIHIIinillilllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIHIillllUIIIINUIHIUHUHIIWHIW 



i<MirniiiMiitiHiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiimuiiiniiiiiiiiiitiniiiiiuiiimiiiiiiiinHiHiuiiiuiiuiiiuiiniiiiiiiuiiiiHiHiHiiiiiiiiiHiiiuiHutiiHuiiiNiiHiiiiiiiiHiHiiitimMiH 



I Cafe 



Confectionary 



(beacock Inn 



Catering 



Soda 



Candies 



Miss L. (At Drug Store) Do you have any Oil 
of Gladness for mops? 

Druggist: Why you haven't got them, have 
you? 

Miss L. : Got what? 

Druggist: The mumps. 



Oswald's 

Drug Store 

71 East Side Sq. 

TOIIvET ARTICLES 

PERFUMES 
FINE STATIONERY 



I Ladies' High Grade, Late Style 

a 

I FUR SCARFS and MUFFS 

I ARE SOI.D BY 

r 
s 

I Frank Byrns 

s 

I Most Reasonable Prices 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 East State St. Jacksonville, 111. 

Illinois Phone 388 



Pictorial Review Patterns 

For Sale xt 



cz 




Yi/y/ic/i^ 



IDR^^XSOODS STORE 



^iininiuMiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiinimiiiiiHiiiniiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilinniiiimiiiiiuMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiniiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniin^^ 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinriiMiiit 



It will pay you to visit 

SCHRAM'S 

Jewelry Store 



Absent-MInded 

The judge was at dinner in the new household, 

when the young housekeeper asked: 

"Did you ever try any of my biscuits, judge? " 
"No," replied the judge, "I never did, but I dare 

say they deserve it." 



I Fancy Articles Christmas Goods 

I COOVER & SHREVE'S 
I Drug Store 



I Kodaks and Supplies 

I Developing and Finishing 



Dorwari mmi 

AI,I, KINDS OF FRESH and 

SAI,T MEATS, FISH, 

POUIvTRY, ETC. 

Both Phones 196 230 W, State St. 



^ ""iiniiimuiumiii niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiuiuiinuiiiinriiiuiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiniiiiiimriiiiiii inn 



COOK 

LIGHT with GAS 

HEAT 

Jacksonville Railway & 
Lig-ht Company 

224 South Main Street 



Ask your grocer for i 

HOLSUM I 

BRKAD I 

3 

Made Clean. Delivered clean | 
in waxed paper wrappers I 



iiiiiiiriiiiiiiiniiiiiirriiiiinmiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiimiiruiiiinmuiiif 



For those who discriminate 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to 
please the students who come to our city. We select only the 
best materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. 

Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and 
Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. 

Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all 
College functions. 

Vickery & Merrigan 

OATERERS 

227 West State Street 



The True Fisherman 

Fishermen have a more philosophic view 
of chance and fate than any other brotherhood. 
"You'll find there are no fish in that pond." 
"What did you tell me for? Now you've spoiled 
my whole day's fishing." 



Hillerby's 
Dry Goods Store 

Safest Place 
to Trade 



The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital • . . . $200,000 
Surplus . . 32,000 

Deposits . . . 1,100,000 

U. S. Depository for Postal Saving Bank 

Julius E. Strawn, President 
Miller Weir, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear 

H. J. Rogers, A. A. Curry 

C.B.Graff 



Brady Brothers 

Hardware, Cutlery 
Paints 



C.S.MARTIN 

Fine Pictures — Artistic Framing | 
Frames and Ovals of all 
descriptions and sizes 

Imported and Domestic 
W.ill Paper 

314 W. Stat^ St., Scott Block 

Jacksonville, 111. 



ITiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilniiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHmiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiK 



iiiiiiiiiiHimiiiiiniininiiiiimiiiniiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiinMiiiinitiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiMHiiiiiiiniMiiiiiNiiiiiiiiniitiMriiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiitMnimiiiitiiniii^ 



The most dainty things in Rings and Jewelry. 

New and handsome styles of goods in Sterling Silver 

Highest grades of Cut Glass, and every 

description of Spectacles and E^ye Glasses 

Fine Diamonds a Specialty 

at 

RUSSE:LL «& LYON'S 

West Side Square 
Both Phones 96 



Yellow-covered literature was not allowed in the 
Benson family, but Harold had friends who narrated 
to him some of the stirring tales they had read, 

"What is your ambition, Harold?" asked an aunt 
who was visiting the Benson household, and who was 
blessed with a long purse. "Perhaps you've not 
decided yet what you'd like to be or do by and by," 
she added. 

"Oh, yes. Aunt Ellen," said Harold, shaking his 
head at such a suggestion, "I'm all decided. 
I should like to be such a man that people would 
tremble like leaves at the mention of my name." 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe say 

We can furnish your 

Shoes and Party Slippers 

in the popular styles, 

leathers, and 

fabrics 



F. E. Farrell 



E. E. Crabtree 



Established 1864 



I 



F. G. FARRELL & CO. | 

i 

BANKERS I 

E 

at 

I 

Successors to First National Bank | 

s 

Jacksonville, 111. s 



(§rapt)ic 

arts! 

Concern 



ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 



limilUIIIUHIIiniMIHIinnilllllllllllllllHHIIIIUIIHIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIUnilllllllliniHIUIIHIHMIIIinillllllllllllllllllllUMIIIIHIIIIIIIHnillllHIIHIIIIIIi^ 



:LUHiniminiMinniiiiiiiniiiinnniiiiiiinniiiiiiMiHiniiinninintiiniiniiiiiiniiiiiiniiininniiiiiiiiiiMniiiiiiMiiiiniiininiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim 



J. A. OBERMEYER 



HARRY P. OBERMEYER 



CITY DRUG AND BOOK STORE 

Stationery, Pennants, Novelties, Drug's and 
TOILEiT REiQUISITES 

Quality Counts — We Count 



Phones: Illinois 572, Bell 457 



Corner South Main St: and Square 



A newly elected squire in Wisconsin was much 
elated by his honors, but was not sure that he could 
carry them gracefully. So he haunted the court- 
house to gather stray crumbs of wisdom from higher 
courts which sat there. 

One day he sat in judgment on his first case, and 
when the testimony was all in and the arguments 
made, he said: 

"The court takes this case under advisement until 
next Wednesday morning, when it will render a 
verdict in favor of the defendant." 



iHARRYHOFFMAN FLORAL CO. 

I 

I Designs, Cut Flowers, 

f Plants 

I Southwest Corner Square 

I Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

I Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

I Greenhouses, Bell 775 



THE SATISFACTION 
we enjoy through selling you 

OUR FINE SHOES 

is equaled only by 

YOUR SATISFACTION 

in wearing them 

Evening Slippers 

Jas. McGinnis & Co- 

62 East Side Square 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING 

for the latest in Suits, Ladies' Underwear, Ribbons 

Laces, E^mbroidery Materials or Notions 

Visit the store that carries the 

up-to-date merchandise 

F=HEI-F=© c& 0©BOI=RIME 



?niuiiiiiuiinHMmiiiuiiiMutiuiiMniriiMiHiiiiiiiii)iiniiniiiitiiiMMniiniiiiHiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiirimNiiiiiiiirriniiiiniNnrii^ 



„„ „„|„„|, tmiii i!ii!iiuiiiimiiiniiiii!i imiii iiiiiiiiiiim iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini i imwii iiiiiiiimnii iiiiumi| 

SHKET MUSIC, MUSIC MERCHANDISE | 

TALKING MACHINES, RECORDS | 

AND SUPPLIES i 



19 SOUTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE 



Memoi*y 

Somebody of a psychological turn of mind once 
asked Lord Rosebery, "What is memory?" 

"Memory," Rosbery replied, promptly but some- 
what pensively, "Memory is the feeling that steals 
over us when we listen to our friends' original 
stories." 



Ayers Mational Bank 



Capital 
03,000 

Surplus 
$50,000 



Deposits 
$1,000,000 

FOUNDEIJ 1832 




The combined capi- 
tal and surplus of this 
bank is 

One Quarter 
Million 
Dollars 

the largest of any bank 
in Morgan County. 

UNITED STATES 
DEPOSITORY 



OFFICERS 
M. F. Dunlap, President O. F. Buffe, Cashier 

Andrew Russel, Vice President R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashier 

R. M. Hockenhull, Vice President H. C. Clement, Asst. Cashier 

C. G. Rutledge, Vice President 

DIRECTORS 
Owen P. Thompson George Deitrick 
Edward F. Goltra R. M. Hockenhull 
John W. Leach M. F. Dunlap 
iiiiiiiniiMi lilt iiiiiii iiiiiii iiiiiiimiiimiiimiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiimHi 1 iMiimiiiiimiiiiiiu.: 



Harry M. Capps 
O. F. Buffe 
Andrew Russel 




Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 



College of Liberal Arts 

(Full classical and scientific courses) 

College oi Music 
School of Fine Arts 
School of Expression 
School of Home Economics 
CA Standard College — one of the best. 
Regular college and academy courses 
leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- 
inently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located 
in the Middle West, in a beautiful, 
dignified, old college town, noted for 
its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends 
who are looking for a good college. 

Call or address, Registrar 

Illinois Woman's College, 

Jacksonville, HI. 




lull I iiiimiii iiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiimiiiiitiiiiiii imimmimi ii ii iiimiiiiiHmiiiiiiimmiiiinmimm i iiiiiiii 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiuiuiiui 



QTfje College (greetings! 

€[[ The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College, 
^ Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month. 

<]] Subscriptions, ^i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
<jf Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter^ 



Contents 

District Nursing 3 

Spring Again 7 

Just a Clipping 9 

Left II 

A Slip in Translation I2 

Editorial 1-3- 

Cabinet Council 13 

Junior-Senior Reception 15 

Locals 17 

Endowment 18 

Y. W. C. A 23 

Society 24 

Departments 28 

Alumnse 30 



The 

Graphic Arts 

Concern 



-"^^ WW \\W WW WW WW WW WW WW WW WW WW WW WW "i^?- 



^ ' & 

S Such a starved bank of moss ^ 



C Till, that May-morn, ^ 

S Blue ran the flash across: g 

§ Violets were born. g 

^ — Browning ^ 

§ g 

«C^ ^^ 

=3 ^ 

=^ ^ 

<£=^ ^=::x 

S § 



^?(?M(?MOM(?MMM(?MWMWM(?M(??# 



tt be College (3reetinQ6 

Vol. XVI Jacksonville, 111., April, 1913 No. 7 

DISTRICT NURSING 

The program of Christianity, to comfort those that 
mourn, to bind up the broken hearted, to help the poor, the 
fatherless, and the widows, was the new conception that gave 
rise to visiting nursing. To visit the sick poor, to send help 
to them, was an important work of the apostolic church. 
Definitely organized movements were, however, compara- 
tively late. In 1836 an order of Lutheran deaconesses was 
formed by Pastor Fleidner, who saw the needs of organized 
nursing among the poor. 

In America in place of a definitely organized movement, 
the work has grown in a spontaneous way. In 1813 on ac- 
count of an epidemic of yellow fever, the Ladies' Benevolent 
Society of Charleston, S. C, sent out nurses to minister to 
this great need. Their v'ork lasted until 1865, when it was 
interrupted by the war. It M^as again taken up in 1902. The 
society then employed trained nurses to care for the sick in 
poor districts. The first American organization to send 
trained nurses systematically to the poor consisted of a branch 
of the New York City Mission in 1877. This idea the Ethical 
Society of New York followed out in 1879 by placing nurses 
in dispensaries. In 1883 a nurse was sent from New York to 
introduce visiting nursing in Chicago. Here was formed in 
1890 a visiting Nurse Association. Similar associations had 
been established in Boston and Philadelphia in 1886. Balti- 
more in 1896 started the Instructive Visiting Nurse Associa- 
tion with classes for girls and mothers. Lillian D. Wald saw in 
1893 the great need of a nurses' settlement in New York. 
She saw that the efficiency of a nurse's work depended largely 
upon her living among the people of her district. Thus she 
could better feel thejr especial needs. 

Page Three 



V^^t College ^xtttinzsi 




The next stage of progress was marked by the organiza- 
tion of school nurses in New York in 1902. Another special 
field of work is found in nursing in industrial establishments 
and department stores. For instance, the John Wanamaker 
store in New York and the National Cash Register Company 
have responded to the need of special nurses for employees 
In this movement men recognize both a social and an eco- 
nomic advantage. One important feature is the part that em- 
ployees are taught how to keep well. 

In 1906 there were two hundred and twenty associations 
in the United States with five hundred and thirty-seven 
nurses. The range of the work is large. Nurses may work 
as assistants to doctors, as adjuncts to hospitals and dispensa- 
ries in caring for chronic cases and convalescents, as school 
nurses, as sanitary inspectors of the department of health, as 
agents in connection with the charitable organizations, pri- 
vate or public. 

The most interesting phases of the subject are the char- 
acter of the nurse, her work and its effects. It is hard in 
studying these phases not to let emotion be uppermost, and 
this part helps us to realize what must be the strength, phy- 
sical, mental, spiritual of the woman that gives her life to the 
work. She must have good health, attractive in personality, 
for personality has a great deal to do with the success of her 
work. Education, of course, is a requisite. She must be a 
graduate of high standing in a good training school. Execu- 
tive ability is an essential quality with a quick ingenuous 
mind, capable of sensing a situation and acting immediately. 
She must have entered her work because she loves it, because 
she loves humanity, because she sees that she must be her 
brother's keeper. She must be the kind of woman, as Bishop 
Anderson expressed it last year, that has "a mind to compre- 
hend," a heart to warm and a spirit to lighten the burdens 
of other people. To such, thousands of hearts will be opened 
to the messages of hope she has to give. 

Sickness opens approach to hearts that might not be 
reached in any other way. With this broad womanly sympa- 

Page Four 




Wbt College ^reeting^ 




thy, she must see that the evils she encounters every day must 
be cured by methods scientific and systematic. Here, as in 
everything else, prevention must be the watchword. When 
she enters a home to nurse a patient, she teaches the whole 
family the value of cleanliness and simple laws of health. 
Hers is not the mere duty of nursing. She must do anything 
that she finds to do in the home. Besides carrying out the 
doctor's orders, she must be able to attend efficiently to sim- 
ple household duties. Not the least of her power comes in 
her ability to lift by kind, sympathetic words many toward a 
little of the beautiful in life. It is said that a home she has 
once entered never again falls so low as she found it at her 
coming. Her principal aim is not to serve the needs of phy- 
sician, but of patient. Though the rule is that she observes 
the demands of etiquette toward the physician, she may defy 
him on grounds of common sense and good management. 

N"o one is better able than she to judge social and eco- 
nomic conditions of a city. She sees the physical and spirit- 
ual ills of environment as those cannot M^ho do not have the 
hand to hand conflict with the poor. She learns when the 
child labor law is violated; when pay for work is insufficient; 
when homes are overcrowded; when there is no education or 
recreation. She is of inestimable worth to the board of health 
and often to industrial conditions. In time of disaster she 
knows what to do. She cannot change the shop hours or the 
wages, but she can inform the people of the actual conditions. 

A glance at the day's work of a district nurse may make 
us wonder that it does not become automatic routine; but 
could we follow her we should find why her work interests 
her and why each day some new problem is to be solved. 
There is no street where she may not go, no home of sickness 
wherein she is not welcome. Daily she goes to the patients, 
or answers the calls made to her by dispensaries, private doc- 
tors, charitable organizations, or any member of a sick fam- 
ily. The right to ask for her should be unrestricted, for some 
of the old chronic cases that do not come to the attention of 
the doctors are just the ones who need her care and kindly 

Page Five 




(E^fie College ^vtttin^i 



word. Now and then she may hear of a sick person whom she 
seeks out on her rounds. Her pencil and paper are very im- 
portant, for she daily makes the most careful, statistical re- 
port of the places she visits. The system of report is very 
simple, but thorough and complete. 

In cases where any payment is possible, it is best for a 
nurse to charge a small fee. In visits to families of different 
economic grade it is better for the patients to pay as they 
are able. We are likely to overlook the advantage of a nurse 
of this kind to the middle class. This use is especially true 
in a small city. There are many cases of long illness in fam- 
ilies that though they can not afford a nurse, can pay a small 
sum each day for the scientific care of a district nurse. By 
home nursing, moreover, hospitals are relieved of excessive 
demands. In many cases home nursing results in a father's 
seeing the need of steady work to pull a child through sick- 
ness, whereas, if the child were taken to a hospital, all re- 
sponsibility would be taken from him. By living in a settle- 
ment a nurse has much more chance to help in the social con- 
dition of the community. The settlement home is the place 
where the neighbors meet. The nurses are club leaders, teach- 
ers, entertainers. Thus they weave themselves into the life 
of the people. 

Some training schools require their seniors to spend 
three months in visiting nursing. These pupil nurses are 
supervised by a trained district nurse. It is a splendid train- 
ing for them because it makes them more careful in economic 
lines. Even if they can't give their lives to nursing the poor, 
they get some definite idea of the great work that is to be 
done. 

Hourly nursing is another phase of the subject that is 
growing rapidly. It depends largely on reports of physicians 
to nurses, but may be managed by some association. These 
nurses go all over the city to give relief for an hour or more 
to families that cannot pay for the services of a nurse all day. 

The work of school nurses can only be mentioned, 
though it is a subject that has been largely developed. These 

Page Six 



^ 



tE^t CoQege ^ttttinssi 



women visit schools to examine the pupils carefully. Where 
there is the slightest defect, pupils are sent to the school phy- 
sician. Many diseases and afflictions are prevented that 
might have caused the child to lose his education. The 
nurses then treat these cases in the school; or, if they are 
sent away from school, they follow them up in their homes. 

District nurses have done much against the white plague 
in connection with the Anti-tuberculosis Society. In this 
disease the nurse is more of a teacher and inspector than a 
nurse. She gives instruction about cleanliness, ventilation, 
diet, contagion and prevention of the disease. Each nurse 
has a special district for which she is responsible. It is her 
duty to see that all rooms where a consumptive has been are 
thoroughly disinfected before another occupies them. 

The hardest problem to solve is how to reach the remote 
country districts. Miss Lydia Holman was the first to start 
a m-ovement in the mountains of North Carolina. This led 
to the establishment of the Holman Association. The de- 
velopment of isolated rural districts in America is of great 
importance to our national welfare. In the country, nurses 
meet with ignorance and the worst forms of superstition. 

Of recent years especial schools for the training of visit- 
ing nurses have been established. In these schools graduate 
work is done. The Boston school was one of the first and is 
one of the best. These schools are in need of money that 
they may be enlarged and made more efficient. 

Visiting nursing is one of the great means of helping 
our less fortunate brothers, of bettering social and economic 
conditions, and of coming close to the democratic social ideal. 

Emily Jayne Allen, '13. 

SPRING AGAIN 

Wait until the last vestige of winter has disapperaed be- 
fore you start in on an attempt at spring fever. After the 
birds have all come back and the warm rays of the sun have 
coaxed the buds of the apple trees into bloom in the orchard, 

Page Seven 




^^t College ^Ireettngs; 




the task can be accomplished without much trouble. You 
may need a book at first. If you do, be sure to take one that 
does not require mental labor. Now go into the depths of 
the apple orchard, where are to be seen only the pink haze 
of blossoms, the tender green of leaves and grasses and the 
liquid blue of the sky; select a tree where a robin and his 
mate are busily discussing the construction of the new home; 
git down on the soft grass in the cool shade, prop yourself 
against the tree trunk and wait. All about you there is a 
stir as of some one arousing from sleep — a stir that makes 
you all the more sleepy. Listen to that lazy drone of the 
honey laden bees in the blossoms above your head. As the 
8un rises higher and higher even the robin and his mate seem 
to have lost their energy. Look up there through that rift in 
the pink wall and see how far you can see into the blue 
depths. Listen and look and wait. As the gentle spring 
breeze comes whispering through the orchard it brings with 
it a pink cascade of petals. With the dull monotonous hum 
in your ears, your hazy thoughts will, without doubt, become 
entangled in the soft meshes of that fleecy white cloud float- 
ing up there across the blue chasm and you will be carried 
away into the land of dreams. 

Mona Summers, '15. 

It is now that the birds, the sunshine, the balmy winds, 
and timid wild flowers, all cast upon us a spell we are power- 
less to resist. The network of shadows made upon the fresh 
grass by the new green leaves offers an enticing spot for 
weaving dreams, and air castles float before our eyes with 
wonderful possibilities of reality. Every one is happy and 
care free; our tasks do not seem so important as they used; 
we wonder how we could ever have worried so much. Then, 
perhaps, comes a momentary pain among this lazy comfort — 
the remembrance of a duty forgotten. We are surprised at 
our carelessness and resolve that it shall not happen again; 
but so many allurements make resolutions easier made than 
Page Eight 




Wbt CoHese ertttin^si 




carried out — a tennis game, a walk or a ride wins us almost 
every time from tiresome work. 

From the enchantment, the majority of us recover with- 
out any visible evidence of its spell; but a few, who feel the 
effects most deeply, sometimes leave behind them odes and 
lyrics expressing their joy in the spring. F. Sidell, 

It was April, and it was raining in Jonesburg. The 
heavy, downfalling torrents struck the pavement with a 
bouyant spatter, then turned to the gutters on either side 
and rushed in foamy, yellow fury into the gaping tiles which 
gulped in the restless flood at every street corner. The wind 
sent the drops of water under the edges of low-held um- 
brellas, as it whipped the draggled garments of the few 
pedestrians against their wet ankles. In fence corners, drag- 
gle-feathered chickens huddled close together in a vain at- 
tempt to obtain shelter. A forlorn, yellow puppy crowded 
his disconsolate, shivering little form against the drenched 
palin.o' of the fence and peered appealingly up into the face 
of every passer-by. Joe Timmon.'', at Binger's drug store, 
venturing the remark th'.t be "'lowed this here rain 'ud about 
clar up all the sumv that's left," picked up his bottle of lin- 
seed oil, pulled his slouched hat lower over his brow, turned 
up his coat collar, and set out solidly to face the blinding 
water sheets. Ever}' person or thing in Jonesburg, exposed 
to the weather, was helpless 'before the resistless dash of the 
water. Even the limbs of the trees trembled in the force of 
th blast. Finally, the most daring of pedestrians gave up. 
Jonesburg went into the house, shut the door, and let na- 
ture have the right of way in a water crusade which was her 
first movement in spring house cleaning. 

Euth Want, '16. 

JUST A CLIPPING 

Perhaps if the article had been left in its original sur- 
roundings, a column among many in the morning newspaper, 

P»ge Nin* 






%%t College ^reetinsft 



it would not have seemed quite so pertinent; but as a clip- 
ping it took on an individualism that could not be denied. 
It forced itself not only to be casually read, but also to be. 
thoughtfully considered. 

It had been sent half-way across the continent to the 
college girl in a letter from home — sent in jest, no doubt, by 
the long suffering, very loving family. Nevertheless, it was 
a cruel piece; but it had one cardinal virtue — it made no at- 
tempt to hide the truth. With a big comprehensive swoop it 
came down upon the over critical girl. Here her critical 
powers developed to the state that called forth continual 
comments on friend and foe alike, the family, the world of 
literature and art. Was it true that the little slip of the 
mother's tongue was carefully noted, corrected; that embar- 
rassment reigned, while the story that the mother had been 
trying to tell was ruined before it was ever finished? It was 
, absurd that the father could not tell why he loved that queer 
picture of "Delaware Gap" better than all the rest of the pic- 
tures in the house. Why didn't he analyze his feelings more 
carefully? On every hand the "educated" girl was the critic. 

The newspaper clipping was all too true. The college 
girl felt extremely guilty. She, too, had done just these 
things. Now it did seem as if something was wrong if her 
college education made everything grate upon her, spoiled 
not only the pleasure of others, but her own as well. A knowl- 
edge that made defects larger than all else could not be the 
right knowledge. Surely her college must give her more 
than this. She was glad she was learning, glad opportunity 
and study had made her see her own lack, had given her a 
bigger sense of appreciation, had made her want to go on, 
but she was beginning to see that if she was to be truly^ right- 
ly sensitive in her criticism she must be big enough to see 
back of the poor exterior, big enough to know the real when 
she met it, and to grasp the big values that really count. She 
must be able to see the humor or the pathos in the story that 
might be full of mistakes. 

Being truly critical still allowed her the big pleasure of 
Page Ten 




tE^e College Bvtttinsi 




discrimination between right and wrong. She was glad that 
her body did tingle all over at things of beauty, the picture 
that needed study before it could be loved, the choice music, 
the poem that had taken days of work before its meaning 
could be found; but, now, with all this she wanted a chance 
to help others to see, not to spoil what they already had. 

The crumpled newspaper clipping was drawn out of the 
waste basket. It might help to re-read it again. True artis- 
tic sensitiveness in criticism, that fine appreciation without 
the littleness of the too critical, was going to mean the tear- 
ing down of many idols, idols that seemed for a time very es- 
sential, but there was a deep feeling of satisfaction in the 
thought that if these numerous idols were torn down, there 
would come in their stead a more nearly perfect God. 

Arlene Hammell, '15. 

LEFT 

Gyp ran assuredly across the front walk, Jumped up the 
steps and paused expectantly before the big door, one foot 
daintily lifted. Then, purring softly, she began to scratch 
at the panel. But only the silence answered. Mildly sur- 
prised, she backed off to a pillar, where she sat, turning her 
head this way and that as if seeking an explanation. Pres- 
ently she saw that the sun was invitingly resting on a pillow 
under the window. It was a chance for undistur'bed slum- 
ber, not to be missed; but as she sprang on the pillow, she 
noticed that the front shade was down. At this, she stopped 
purring and poked her head into all sorts of impossible cor- 
ners, always keeping watch for Bruno. It was increasingly 
surprising that he should not be there to torment her. Where 
too was Alice? Since yesterday Gyp had not seen her. The 
big mover's wagon in front of the house had meant nothing 
to Gyp, but the stillness now began to mean much. 

She waited, furtively watching, till at last she heard 
footsteps on the sidewalk and a big, strange man appeared. 
An unexpected kick sent her flying over the railing as a rough 

Page Elerea 




Ztt College ^xettinqi 




voice exclaimed, "Left their bloomin' cat — well, Fll fix it if 
it stays around here— clear out!" With a second kick, he .^ 
reinforced his statement, then slammed the door as he en- ! 
tared the house. Margaret Coultas, '16. 



A SLIP IN TRANSLATION 

The Jackson football game was to blame; the team had 
not got back to Eathburn until four-twenty that morning — 
a sleepy "eleven." In German class, during the last period 
of an interminable morning, "Shorty," full six feet two, was 
vainly fighting sleep, Nature conspired against him, for it 
was a warm autumn day, and things were generally conducive 
to slumber. There was not a member of the class, except 
perhaps the girl translating from "L'Arabbiatta," that 
not adrift on some sea other than Heyse's Mediterranean. 
"Shorty" was fast reaching the stage where every one would 
know he was asleep, when FLAP! a gust of wind had caught 
the window shade in a merry whirl. "Shorty" started and 
looked dazedly at Miss Deane, as he drawled out, 

"Did you call on me?" 

He "came to" just in time to straighten up unconcern- 
edly as she gave an inquiring glance around. 

Nova Brennerman, '16. 




Page Twelve 



'■r -1 




Cfie College ^reetingtf 



FacuWy Committbb— Miss Weaver, Miss Tanner, Miss Neville. 
Editor— lyois M. Coultas 

Associate Editors — Elizabeth Tendick, I^etta Irwin, Mary Lawson. 
BuSlNBSa Managers— Elizabeth Dunbar, Emily Jane Allan, Helena 



Munson. 



Until six years ago we were only an academy with two 
years of seminary work. For the Woman's College the change 
to college rank meant turn about face. The spirit of the 
academy has hovered over us, however, even down to the 
present time, and in these six years it has been hard to get 
away from that influence. College spirit has been the goal 
for which we have striven, but not until we, as a student 
body, could sacrifice something, could do something bigger 
than anything we had yet done, something that made us for- 
get self for the time, did the college spirit come. 

The past month has been one of change. The intense 
excitement and strong feeling that prevailed among the stu- 
dents during the days when we were giving all our thoughts 
and time to endowment would not have been possible had 
we not been brought definitely to a clearer realization of our 
latent loyalty. The ideal that we must now have is to keep 
the current of our enthusiasm in the right direction. The 
enthusiasm which we have shown for endowment, a more 
temporary interest, must now be shown for the college as a 
college. 

COLLEGE COUNCIL 

In morning chapel, on March 5, Dr. Harker announced 
the organization of an Illinois Woman's College Council. He 
then read aloud the constitution. This seems of such vital 
interest to all students and alumnae that it is given in full 
below. The College Council is a most important step for- 
ward for the Woman's College. It means that as the stu- 
dents become more capable and show themselves more ready 
for it, they will become more nearly self-directing and self- 
Page ThirtoNi 




Wbt €oUtQt ^xtttixiQi 



controlling. The first meeting was held on March seventh 
and the following officers were elected: President, Lois 
Coultas; vice-president, Feril Hess; secretary, Celia Catheart; 
treasurer, Anne Heist. 

THE ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE COUNCIL. 
Organized March 5, 1913. 
This College Council is organized so that the students 
may co-operate in all possible general ways in the upbuilding 
of the College. The President hopes that it will greatly aid 
in the development of true college spirit and loyalty. As ex- 
perience may show changes to be necessary or desirable, he 
reserves the right to modify this plan in any way at any time. 

ARTICLE I.— Objects. 

The College Council stands for the following definite 
objects: 

For the promotion of college spirit; for the conserving 
of college loyalty and enthusiasm; for the increase of college 
students, and the continuance of students to graduation; for 
the honor of high scholarship, and securing the highest 
ideals of honor and true womanliness among students; for 
advancing interest in the literary, scientific, musical and 
other general societies, and in athletics and out-door sports; 
for the unifying of all college interests; and for suggesting, 
organizing and directing all general student activities. 

ARTICLE II.— Organization. 
The Council will consist of the class officers of the five 
college classes, the class presidents of the five college classes, 
the presidents of the four college literary societies, the presi- 
dent of the Y. W. C. A., the president of the Athletic Asso- 
ciation, the editor-in-chief of the College Greetings, the 
president of the Glee Club, the class officer of the fourth 
year Academy class, the president of the fourth year Acad- 
emy class, and the president of the Academy Literary So- 
ciety. 
Page Fourteen 




Wi^t CoOege ^reetingis 




AETICLE III.— Officers. 
The Council will organize by the election of a President, 
a Vice-President, a Secretary and a Treasurer, all to be 
chosen from the student members of the Council. 

ARTICLE IV.— Voting. 
Each member of the Council shall have one vote. There 
shall be no action by the Council on any motion that is not 
supported by at least two-thirds of the faculty members and 
two-thirds of the student members. 

ARTICLE v.— Financial. 
The Council may raise funds for such expenses as may 
be involved in the plans which they adopt, and may disburse 
such funds by regular council action. They shall make an 
itemized report of their receipts and expenses twice each 
year in the December and the May numbers of the Greetings. 

ARTICLE VI.— General College Meetings. 
On request of the Council, the students will be permit- 
ted the use of the College chapel at regular chapel hour on 
any day, provided such request is made a reasonable time in 
advance, and except for special occasions not to exceed once 
in any week. 

ARTICLE VII.— By-laws, Etc. 
The Council will arrange for its own meetings, and will 
make by-laws for the transaction of its business in harmony 
with this Constitution, and shall have power to appoint from 
the entire college any auxiliary committee for the carrying 
out of its plans. 



SENIOR-JUNIOR RECEPTION 

A forerunner of the Senior-Junior reception appeared 
on the library door the Friday before the reception. It was 
a poster devised as a money-making scheme for endowment, 
but at the same time sensing the attitude of the uninvited to- 
ward the event of the season. In the upper part of the pos- 

Pfige Fifteea 




tS^e CoUege ^xtttin^si 




ter stood an important looking Senior, with a more important 
looking train; in the lower corner was an uninvited lower 
classman gazing, admiringly, longingly, upward. The words, 
"A penny a look," explained the purpose of the poster. It is 
not known how many pennies were collected, but it is known 
that there was the usual besieging of the rooms of the in- 
vited by the uninvited, the usual waste of superlatives as the 
Senior or Junior on parade was turned first this way, then 
that by the besiegers. When the last hairpin was adjusted, 
the last flower pinned on, the last fold of the train put in 
place, the uninvited were left to revel in the halls above, 
while the Seniors and Juniors to verify anticipation with the 
event, descended to society halls. In spite of the unusually 
busy Saturday the Seniors had found time to change the bus- 
iness-like recitation rooms and the corridors into homelike 
reception halls. The class officers. Miss Neville and Miss 
Johnston, with the class presidents, Elizabeth Dunbar, Mary 
Watson and Anne Heist, were in the receiving line. Gracious- 
ly they welcomed the guests, and soon the rooms were full of 
chatter and laughter. A little conversation game had been 
planned. The inauguration, life, the outlook for summer 
baseball, spring vacation, were some of the topics which 
served, as did the reverend bishop's text as points of depar- 
ture. One gentleman was heard to say, "How can a fellow 
talk to a girl about baseball who doesn't know anything about 
Frank Chance?" The change of partners in the game was 
varied by wandering to the farthest end of the corridor where 
two pink ribboned 'prep' girls served frappe, and finally by 
the march to the transformed recitation rooms, where re- 
freshments in the Junior colors, green and white^ were 
served. A little more laughter and chatter, then the guests 
slipped away, the reception was in the past, the Juniors grate- 
ful to the Seniors for the good will shown to them. 



Page Sixteen 



tE'tt College ^reettng£( 




LOCAL CALENDAR 

Feb. 16 — The Y. W. C. A. was led by Honore Limerick; 
the subject was God's Promises. 

Feb. 17 — Lambda Alpha Mu banquet. 

Feb. 18 — Dr. Harker gave one of the best chapel talks 
of the year on "And they set out to come into the land of 
Canaan and into the land of Canaan they came.^^ 

Feb. 19 — Miss Cowgill led morning chapel. 

Feb. 20 — Miss Neville led morning chapel. 

Feb. 21 — Announcement of half-day holiday on Feb. 22. 

Feb. 22 — Washington's birthday program. 

Feb. 23 — Mildred Wolfers conducted the Y. W. services. 

Feb. 2-1 — Miss JSTicholson's recital. 

Feb. 25 — The campaign for endowment among the girls 
is bringing in the last of the personal privileges. 

Feb. 26 — Mass meeting of the girls. 

Feb. 27 — Three thousand dollars still remains to be 
given by the town in order to secure Mr. Strawn's gift of 
$10,000.' 

Feb. 28 — Mass meeting of giils. Town gives the re- 
mainder- of the $60,000. 

March 1 — Endowment stunts in chapel. Holiday in cele- 
bration of gifts from town, faculty and girls. 

Dinner in evening in honor of Dr. Hanscher's services 
during the campaign. 

Theta Sigma candy sale. 

Junior-Senior reception. 

March 2 — Feril Hess led in Y. W. C. A. at one of the 
best meetings of the year. Her subject was Enthusiasm. 

March 3 — ^Phi Nu play. 

March 4 — Pie sale by the fourth year preps. Miss Car- 
ter gave a talk in Belles Lettres on Early French Art. 

March 5. — Perhaps the most important day of all the 
college year. Dr. Harker announces the formation of a col- 
lege council for the Illinois Woman's College. A notice will 

Page Seventeen 




tS1)t CoOese ^vntingi 



be found elsewhere of this most significant organization, its 
personnel and its purpose. 

Y. W. C. A. election of officers for coming year. 

March 6 — Music recital. 

March 7 — College Council elects officers. 

March 8 — Belles Lettres open meeting. 

March 9 — Miss Neville led chapel, talking to the stu- 
dents about Palestine. 

Installation of Y, W. officers. 

March 10 — Miss Parsons' recital. 

March 11 — Meeting of the student body. 

March 12 — Miss Eolfe talked to the Social Service class 
on the Juvenile Court and Geneva. 

March 13 — Miss Cowgill led morning chapel. 

March 14 — Miss Weaver is visiting her mother at Lin- 
coln, 111. 

March 15 — Announcement of election of May Queen 
Tuesday, March 18. 

Great regret was felt by every one that Dr. Steiner be- 
cause of a severe attack of the grippe was unable to give his 
address here tonight, as had been planned. At present we 
are expecting him on May 5 or 6. 

ENDOWMENT 

Fire! Surely that's what was the matter. With the 
most startling visions of flames flashing through nearly every 
mind, the girls darted into the corridors — there to be relieved 
by the announcement of a student mass meeting. Every one 
responded to the alarm and many were typical representa- 
tives of bystanders at an early morning conflagration. 

Letta Irwin briefly but definitely set forth the purpose 
of this hasty gathering. The student pledges had fallen 
$847.70 short of the $5,000 goal, so there was need for ac- 
tion. Frances Freeman was first to the rescue and "knocked 
off" the 70 cents. In a very few seconds little class bunches 
were scattered all about the halls — ^not without a purpose 
Page Eighteen 




tlTije CoUege ^reettngse 




and not without the accomplishment of that purpose, as was 
later seen. The first year preps substracted the first $100 and 
added it to their pledge, which was at that time more than 
$500. Every class erased a generous amount and with liberal 
pledges from the Minnesota and Indiana clubs and from the 
''Greetings," the deficit was soon more than raised. Dr. and 
Mrs. Harker came to hear of this great victory, and had even 
more wonderful surprises in store for us. The Y. W. scholar- 
ship is considered in the endowment, and that $1,000 boosted 
the student pledge, all told, to $6,750 — an amount that we 
would have considered almost impossible when we first heard 
the call to a mass meeting, and a positive proof that "there 
is nothing we cannot do." 

A more than enthusaistic mass meeting was held in the 
society halls after lunch Friday, February twenty-eighth. 
Now in this day, when mass meetings were so popular and so 
important, it is needless to say 1:15 class bells received little 
attention. The prospects for the completion of the $60,000 
campaign that night were so encouraging that plans for a 
rousing celebration were in great demand. Many and varied 
were the stunts suggested, but that of a torch light parade 
received the most hearty support. A committee was imme- 
diately appointed to procure the necessary brooms and kero- 
sene and arrange for their close companionship that after- 
noon. Euth Harker was commissioned to ring the signal as 
soon as the favorable report was received — no matter what 
the hour. From the spirit manifested every girl would be 
ready and glad to hear the sound of that bell (for this once, 
even though it might be "rising" bell). With the enthusiasm 
well stirred up and the outline plans formed, this meeting 
adjourned to assemble again at 4:15. 

None the less anxious, the girls hastened to the society 
halls as soon as the last class was over to know the latest ar- 
rangements. Leaders had been named and the route sug- 
gested, so with the repeated request to have any and all kinds 
of noise instruments ready for service, nothing remained to 
be done— until the two taps of the signal bell were heard. 

Page Nineteen 




tEte CoOese ^reettngs( 




And that anxiously awaited sound came shortly before 
10 o'clock. In a twinkling the scene of perfect quietness 
was changed to one of general commotion. Faculty members 
were appearing at doors and excited girls were chasing down 
the corridors. Every one with some attachment — dust 
pans and wooden spoons or squeaky horns. The blazing 
brooms were distributed at the steps and the noisy procession 
made its way down Clay avenue and then back to the middle 
of the pavement down State street to the headquarters. The 
jollification there, as regards the noise at any rate, could not 
be described. After all the cheering Mr. Crabtree and Drs. 
Pitner and Hancher gave us stirring speeches. Before our 
entire supply of energy was exhausted, in true Indian fashion 
we wound our way out to Mr. Strawn's home to sing for him 
who had generously contributed to this campaign. 

The overflowing enthusiasm of the students was so far 
from adequate expression in the jubilee of Friday night that 
the regular chapel exercises were turned over to them Satur- 
day, March the first. Dressed in white, the entire student 
body marched into chapel that morning with paper sacks 
marked by dollar signs hung over their shoulders. After they 
had taken their seats, a few of the girls who had slipped out 
of the marching line, came out on the platform, a company 
of soldiers, with Feril Hess as their leader. After putting 
her company through various maneuvers, Miss Hess suddenly 
ordered them to present arms to Dr. Harker. The arms were 
paper sacks covered with dollar signs. As the last of the 
maneuvers, the sacks were finally exploded, and the company 
marched off. Next appeared some girls representing the dif- 
ferent kinds of work that they have taken up in order to earn 
endowment money—bootblacks, errand boys, manicurists, hair 
dressers, and shampooers. After singing our endowment songs 
the next stunt was given. Some girls came out on the stage, 
and from their clever pantomiming we learned that any en- 
dowment work and giving was in much disfavor with them. 
At last one girl, who has caught the endowment fever, rushes 
up to them and begins her work of making the others as 

Page Twenty 




tEf^t CoUese ^xtttinzi 




eager to help as is she herself. Soon all are buisly engaged in 
making pledges, raising them, and persuading others to raise 
them. At last they work to the front of the stage, each one 
holding before her a large placard bearing the name of the 
organization which she represents and the amount given or 
pledged by that organization. 

First Year Academy $700.00. 

Second Year Academy 100.00. 

Third Year Academy 635.00. 

Fourth Year Academy 500.00 

Academy Specials 213.00. 

College Specials 500.00. 

Freshmen 600.00. 

Sophomores 300.00. 

Juniors 375.00. 

Seniors 380.00. 

Greetings 100.00. 

Y. W. C. A 1000.00 

Minnesota Club 25.00. 

Indiana Club 50.00. 

Belles Lettres 500.00. 

Phi Nu 500.00. 

Theta Sigma 100.00. 

Lambda Alpha Mu 100.00 

Academia 50.00. 

These amounts, with the sum already on hand, made a 
total of $6,750 from the student body. 

Dr. Harker, amid the most enthusiastic applause from 
the girls, then took from his pocket the familiar little piece 
of black chalk and marked off squares on the endowment 
board, until there were only sixty-two left to be marked off 
before next spring. The gift of $1,750.00 from the faculty 
was also announced on this morning. 

Before Dr. Harker resumed his seat he offered a prayer 
of thanks for the love and care which had made this day 
what it was. No heart in that audience was untouched by 
that wonderful prayer, coming at such a fitting time. The 

FtLge Tweiity>one 



C^e CoUege ^rtetin^si 




love and veneration that Dr. Barker's students feel for him 
reached even greater pitch as he stood before them and 
prayed out of the fullness of his heart. 

After short talks by Dr. Harker and Dr. Hanscher, and 
after the girls had deposited their money bags in a huge pile 
on the platform, chapel was dismissed with leave for a holi- 
day for the rest of the day. 

In recognition of the service and help that Dr. Hanseher 
has given to the Woman's College and to Dr. Harker, a din- 
ner was given in his honor Saturday evening, March first. 
Miss Weaver, in her charming way, spoke of Dr. Harker, the 
dreamer, the man of visions, and of Dr. Hanseher as the man 
who made these dreams come true. As she finished she asked 
to hear from some of the students. Six girls then mentioned 
the appreciation we feel for Dr. Hanseher, the town, Mrs. 
Lambert, Dr. Harker, the faculty, and last one of the girls 
spoke for the students themselves. Miss Hay, representing 
both town and school, spoke of the keen interest she has felt 
in the outcome of the work done by Dr. Harker and Dr. 
Hanseher. Dr. Harker paid a high tribute to Dr. Hanseher, 
speaking of his versatility of gifts and his absolute depend- 
ability. After Dr. Hanseher had thanked the president for 
all he had done for him, Dr. Harker made the startling an- 
nouncement of an additional gift of $8,000 to the college in 
the name of Mrs. Harker, speaking gratefully of the share 
that she has had in this work for endowment. Without her 
ready sympathy and encouragement, even Dr. Harker could 
not have accomplished what he has done. Smiles and tears 
were strangely mingled, for every one was much moved. 

With great enthusiasm the girls joined in singing two 
additional stanzas to our Endowment Song, written for Dr. 
Hanseher, as the guests left the dining room. 

As an outgrowth of the enthusiasm of the last few days, 
another stanza has been added to our regular college song: 
Page Twenty-two 




tSiit College Greetings; 



Hail to our Alma Mater! 

The pride of all the land! 
We will loyal be forever, ' 

And by her side we'll stand. '■' 

Her fame for aye we will unfold 

Till known to all she'll be, 
And oft her glories be retold 

By us o'er land and sea. 

Y. W. C. A. 

The new cabinet for the year 1913-14 was installed Sun- 
day afternoon, March eighth. The service was very impres- 
sive as conducted by Helen Moore, our former president, 
whose work together with that of the cabinet has been so 
successful this year. Seldom has a cabinet been in such per- 
fect concord ,and sympathy; not one of its members had to be 
pushed or pulled by the others, not one antagonized the com- 
mon spirit. Though they have not realized their highest 
ideals, they have built so well on such firm and solid founda- 
tions that it will be possible for the new cabinet to take up 
the work where they left it, almost without a break and with- 
out having to retrace any steps. All this gives the new cab- 
inet an added responsibility as well as privilege. To carry 
out ideas that have been begun, to work together as our 
predecessors have done, to increase the influence of the Asso- 
ciation in every way, to make Y. W. a vital part in the life of 
every student — these are the aims set before us, the standard 
about which we shall set all our strength to rally. It was 
fitting that as the new president took her place, the old cab- 
inet should present to Miss Moore an armful of roses as a 
slight token of their appreciation and love. Seldom have we 
felt so much like one big family. The new cabinet consists 
of the following officers and committee chairmen: 

President — Letta Irwin, '14. 

Vice President — Mary Lawson, '15, 

Secretary — ^Abbie Peavoy, '14. 

Pago Twenty-thrM 




W^t CoUess ^xtttin^fi 




Treasurer — Esther Fowler, '18. 
Devotional committee — Euth Want, '16. 
Missions committee — Lena Gumerson, '15. 
Social committee — Mary Watson, '14; Elizabeth To- 
hill, '17. 

Systematic giving — Winifred Burmeister, '15. 
Association news — Honore Limerick, '15. 

Devotional services this month have been led by Honore 
Limerick on "God's Promises;" Mildred Wolfers on "The Big 
Fight," and Feril Hess on "Enthusiasm Eightly Directed." 

We are indebted to Miss Cowgill, Miss Knopf and Irene 
Crum for the pretty new curtains in the Y. W. rest-room. 



SOCIETY NOTES 

Since the announcement in the Greetings several 
months ago of the organization of a new academy society, the 
society has not been idle. Not only has it been organized 
and its literary duties well started, but it has made its pres- 
ence felt in the college by a gift of fifty dollars to the endow- 
ment fund. The zeal and energy which our academy girls 
show in every direction in which they are interested is not 
lacking in the loyalty they give to their society. The 
Academia has chosen as its motto, "Through knowledge lies 
power." The flower is a deep pink rose, the emblem the 
torch, and the colors are old rose and silver. At the organi- 
zation meeting the following officers were elected: 

President — Elizabeth Tohill. 

Vice President — Johanna Onken. 

Eecording Secretary — Irene Sandberg. 

Corresponding Secretary — Eachel Morris. 

Treasurer — Esther Fowler. 

Chaplain — Zelma Jones. 

Critic — ^Helen Tooley. 

Pianist — Nora Alexander. 

Ushers — Fay Boone, Mildred Dickson. 
JPage Twenty-four 



Wi^t College 4lreetingfii 



Miss Carter read a splendidly written paper before 
Belles Lettres at the meeting of March fourth. In it she 
furnished a background for the subsequent discussions of 
French art and artists. The society appreciated her willing- 
ness to give it and the time spent in its preparation. 

The Belles Lettres open meeting was held in the Music 
Hall at 8 o'clock on March the eighth. The program cer- 
tainly upheld the literary standard toward which the society 
strives. The discussion was upon Modern French Art. Euth 
Taylor in an excellent paper upon Eosa Bonheur treated the 
subject of animal painting. Golden Berryman, in her usual 
easy and entertaining manner, talked upon French landscape 
painting, and Louise Gates completed the discussion by an 
excellent treatment of peasant painting. The musical num- 
bers were unusually well rendered. Lucile Olinger's piano 
solo was greatly enjoyed. Helen Jones sang exceedingly well 
and Helen Harrison's violin solo was most artistic. Her hear- 
ers felt as if she had surely entered into the spirit of it. Euth 
Alexander's original story was very clever and delightful, and 
the society certainly had no cause to feel ashamed of its 
academy representation. 

Belles Lettres is very proud of its new picture, "The 
Pot of Basil," by Alexander. At the same time of its fram- 
ing the society's oldest picture, "The Aurora," fey Guido 
Eeni, was reframed. 

The return of Mayme Severns, one of Belles Lettres ex- 
pression Seniors of last year, was a source of much pleasure 
to the society. During her visit the society had a happy re- 
union in the hall in her honor. 

The society was very sorry to lose Angle La Teer, who 
had to leave on account of ill health. Her sister, Mrs. Alex- 
ander, came to send away her things. 

The girls in the society play, "A Scrap of Paper," are 
hard at work upon it. 

Phi Nu is the grateful recipient of twenty-five dollars, 
the generous gift of the father of one of our members, Mr. 
Hammell, of Pasadena, California. 



Page Twenty-five 




^i)t CoUes^ ^reettngs; 




On Thursday evening, February thirteenth, after din- 
ner, the Belles Lettres entertained the Phi Nus in their hall. 
Every one had a happy informal evening. Those blessed 
with talents displayed them for the amusement of others, 
and their efforts were heartily appreciated and enjoyed. De- 
licious sandwiches and coffee were served, during which time 
Marie Wayne labored to give us music with our meal. 

The Phi Nu play, "Cupid at the Varsity," was given 
March third. So far as an appreciative audience and pro- 
ceeds are concerned, we feel fully repaid for our work. At 
the request of the people of the Christian church we repeated 
the play there Tuesday night, March eleventh. 

The Phi Nu society attended the open meeting of Phi 
Alpha at Illinois College, and of Belles Lettres here, in a 
body. 

On February twentieth Frances English in pretty Scotch 
costume gave a program of Scottish selections. 



Theta Sigma has the pleasure of welcoming into the 
scarlet, gold and black eight new members: Pauline Gran- 
tham, Etha Thompson, Frances Fickle, Lucille McCloud, 
Ethel Galaspie, Nova Brenneman, Grace Miles, and Hope 
Halberstadt. 

The society attended the Belles Lettres opening meet- 
ing of March eighth, after which a spread was given for the 
new members. 

On February twenty-fifth we were glad to have as our 
guest Miss Laura Bryan. 

Our candy sale held March first was well patronized. 

The programs have been made very interesting the past 
month by the discussion of the present wars and current 
events. 

Monday, April twenty-first, is the date decided for our 
open meeting. 

Page Twenty-six 




Wi)t CoUegc <§reetinB£{ 



The Lambda Alpha Mu had its first annual banquet at 
the Colonial Inn on the evening of February seventeenth. 
The dining room was tastefully decorated in lavender and 
pink, and the place cards were lavender with gold letters. 

The society is to be congratulated in being able to secure 
Miss Weaver as toastmistress, and greatly enjoyed her talk 
in which she very appropriately likened the event to the 
landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth. This attractive figure 
she carried out to the end in a most charming style. Our 
president, Miss Mary Louise Powell, responded to the toast, 
"The Launching of the Lambda Mu," in a most pleasing 
manner. Mildred Wolfers and Ruth Want responded in 
rhyme to the toasts, "The Flower of Lambda Mu" and the 
"Pearls of Lambda Mn." 

After the toasts Dr. Harker gave us a talk, in which he 
kept us all laughing as only Dr. Harker can. He also said 
some serious things which impressed us all and made us eager 
to attain the heights which he pointed out to us as possible 
to Lambda Mu. 

After the talk we stood to sing our society song, and 
then we adjourned to the music room and gathered around 
the piano to sing college songs. We spent a most enjoyable 
evening together, and hope that each succeeding year the 
Lambda Mu banquet will be the pleasurable and happy event 
that it has proved to be this year. 

The members of Lambda Mu have been enjoying the 
hospitality of the Belles Lettres and Phi Nus who have so 
graciously allowed us the use of their attractive halls. We 
hope that the time will come, and that before many years, 
when we ourselves will be in a position to dispense like hos- 
pitality to others. 

The society attended in a body the annual open meeting 
of the Phi Alpha Society of Illinois College and enjoyed to 
the full the excellent program rendered. 

Labda Mu is busily engaged in preparation for her open 
meeting to be held on the evening of March eighteentli. 

Page Twenty-seven 




Wtit CoOese ^vtttinQS 




epartmentg 



ART NOTES 

Miss Knopf is planning to go to Chicago the end of 
March to attend the great International ExhiTjit of Modem 
Art, which has been creating such a furore in New York, 
where it was pronounced "the greatest exhibition of painting 
and sculpture of modern times." 

Some of the art students are making posters for "A 
Scrap of Paper," the Belles Lettres play. 

EXPRESSION NOTES 

Miss Kidder recently gave a series of readings in In- 
diana and Michigan. March 8 she read "The Terrible Meek" 
for the Study Club of Michigan City, Indiana. March 9 
Miss Kidder again read "The Terrible Meek" at the People's 
church in Kalamazoo, Michigan. While in Kalamazoo she 
gave several other programs for the various organizations and 
institutions of the city. This is Miss Kidder's second visit 
to Kalamazoo this winter, where her work is most favorably 
received. 

March 10, Miss Parsons gave a public recital, at which 
she read Tennyson's "Enoch Arden," with the musical set- 
ting of Eichard Strauss. Mr. Max Swarthout very sympa- 
thetically accompanied Miss Parsons, making a very delight- 
ful evening's entertainment. Miss Parsons' recital had been 
awaited with keen interest by a wide circle of admirers and 
expectations were more than realized in her fine, strong 
work, her sympathy, her thoroughly artistic treatment. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

On March 3 at Taylor's grocery the second year class 
gave a demonstration on the making of cookies. Mr, Taylor 
Page Twenty- eight 




Cfje Cottege ^Ireetingsf 




agieed to furnish all materials and to allow all proceeds to 
be used for endowment, so the department considered the 
cause as justification for the departure from its usual reti- 
cence concerning such exhibitions. Over 100 dozen orders 
were filled, but a number were turned away, as the limited 
time and space would not permit a greater production. 

^? 

COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

The music students have been fortunate enough to have 
two talks on musical numbers that were to appear on pro- 
grams. The first was a talk by Associate Director Swarthout 
analyzing the numbers that were to appear on their program; 
the last by Director Swarthout on the music that is writtten 
for Enoch Arden, and which he gave along with the reading 
of Enoch Arden by Miss Parsons. The talks are thoroughly 
appreciated by the music students and of great benefit to 
them, as it develops the faculty of hearing more intelligently. 

On the evening of March 17, Miss Louise D. Miller, ac- 
companied by Max L. Swarthout, gave her recital. Miss 
Miller was greeted by a large and appreciative audience. 

The following was the program: 

Ocessati di piagarmi Scarlatti 

Aria d' Armida Gluck 

Neopolitan Song Nutile 

Bergere Legere Arr. by Weckerlin 

From seventeenth century. 

L' Adieu du Matin Pessard 

Charmant Oiseau David 

Des Kindes Gebet Eeger 

Du hist die Ruh Schubert 

Verborgenheit Wolf 

Sayonara, A Japanese Romance Cadman 

I. I Saw Thee First When Cherries Bloomed. 

II. At the Feast of the Dead I Watched Thee. 

III. All My Heart Is Ashes. 

IV. The Wild Dove Cries. 

Page Twenty-nine 




tBfit CoUege Greetings: 



^^ 



Members of the faculties of music and expression gave 
a delightful recital at the opera house on Wednesday evening, 
February 19, complimentary to the Illinois Grain Dealers' 
Association. The program was indeed a treat to them who 
were fortunate enough to be present 

A^oice — Pourquoi? Tschaikowsky 

The Lark Now Leaves His Wat'ry Nest Parker 

Miss Anna L. Beebe. 
Voice (duets) — Three Tuscan Songs Caraccialo 

(1) A Streamlet Full of Flowers. 

(2) A Flight of Clouds. 

(3) Nearest and Dearest. 

Venetian Boat Song Blumenthal 

Andalusian Song Puget 

Miss Louise Miller, Mrs. Florence Pierron Hartmann. 

Piano — Gavotte in G Major D. M. Swarthout 

Polonaise in A flat major Chopin 

Mr. Donald M. Swarthout. 

Pteading— The Hour GIa^^ W. B. Yeats 

Miss Amanda Kidder. 

Voice — The Chevalier Belle-Etoile Holmes 

Mrs. Florence Pierron Hartmann. 

Voice (trios) — Sweet and Low Barnby 

One Spring Morning Nevin 

Miss Beebe, Miss Miller, Mrs. Hartmann. 

Violin — Eomanza Andaluza Sarasate 

Mazurka Zarzcyki 

Mr. Max L. Swarthout. 

ALUMNA NOTES 

The marriage of Blanche H. Buxton, class of '92, to Col. 
A. L. Hunt took place last autumn at the home of the bride's 
mother in Olathe, Kansas, in which place Col. and Mrs. Hunt 
will continue to reside. 

Announcement has been received of the marriage of 
Alice Roberts to Mr. John W. Buzick. The At Home cards 
Page Thirty 




^e Cottege Greetings; 




are 367 Gaston Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee. 

The Chicago Tribune of recent date has the following 
mention of a wedding in which the bride and maid of honor 
are both former students of I. W. C: 

"Chicagoans found interest in the marriage of Miss 
Agnes Osborn, daughter of Mr, and Mrs. William Osborn of 
Morris, 111., to George William Thatcher of Eiver Forest, 
which took place in Morris on Saturday at 4:30 o'clock. Miss 
Catherine Yates of Springfield was the maid of honor, and 
John Moore of Eiverside best man. The ther attendants in- 
cluded Miss Helen Thatcher, Miss Caroline Post and Henry 
Thatcher. 

A letter has just been received from Miss Blackburn of 
Bulgaria, which we are printing entire. 

Lo vetch, Bulgaria, February 24, 1913. 
My Dear Mrs. Lambert: 

The other day I received the circular letter sent out by 
yourself to the alumnae of the Illinois Woman's College. Of 
course, I am always interested in all that pertains to the good 
of my Alma Mater, which is really very dear to me. 

I appreciate the trouble taken to keep me in touch with 
all the advance steps taken by the trustees and friends of the 
college. 

It is scarcely necessary, however, to say that under ex- 
isting conditions in Bulgaria, I do not feel justified in ren- 
dering financial help elsewhere at the present time. 

Sorrow and sufl^ering exist on every hand 'and there is 
little prospect that conditions will be much better in the near 
future. The impossibility to secure sufficient fuel and other 
supplies made it necessary to send our girls home for a win- 
ter vacation, but we hope to gather them again soon to com- 
plete the work of the school year. 

Miss Davis and I have improved these weeks in mingling 
with the people in their homes in a way which is impossible 
during school terms. We are both well, despite the strain of 

Page Thirty-one 




Wift College Greetings 




the past five months. Little news conies from the battle line 
since the reopening of hostilities three weeks ago. The pa- 
tience of the people in the midst of all these hardships and 
sacrifices is marvelous. 

It is impossible for the large nations of the world to com- 
prehend what this confiict means to a little country like Bul- 
garia. Few, if any, homes will be untouched by death when 
this cruel war ends. 

"With love and best wishes, sincerely yours, 

Kate B. Blackburn. 



We are glad to receive news from another old student 
of the Woman's College. 

Mrs. S. W. Haskett, who has taught in Mendocino 
county for forty-eight years — in fact, who has the record of 
the longest continuous service in the county — and is the 
mother and grandmother of teachers, was honored by the 
teachers at the institute Friday. She was called to the plat- 
form and presented with a beautiful loving cup of silver 
which was presented by the teachers of Mendocino county. 

The presentation speech was made by School Superin- 
tendent Babcock and there was scarcely a dry eye in the audi- 
ence when the dear old lady, with choking voice, thanked the 
ones who had so kindly remembered her. Mrs. Hasket has 
retired from teaching, but her heart and soul are still devoted 
to the profession. It is safe to say that during her years of 
teaching that she has taught more pupils than probably any 
other teacher in the state. In every town in the county and 
scattered all over the United States are men and women who 
remember her with a kindly feeling as the one who presided 
over their school day destinies in the days gone by. The 
tribute is a well merited one and it is safe to say that words 
will never express the deep appreciation of the recipient. 
Carl Purdy of the Terraces sent a beautiful bouquet of tulips 
which were presented with the cup. — Kepublican Press, May 
17, 1912. 

Page Thirty-two 



iiiiiiiiimiiiniiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiimmiimiiimiiiimmiiiHiimimiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniininiiininiiiiiiniiiiinnniinnitiniinMiimiiiiiimimiiiiimmim^ 

Wishes to announce to the Students and | 

Faculty of the Illinois Woman's Colleg-e I 

that, for the benefit of the Endowment | 

Fund, she will allow 15 per cent discount | 

on the dollar, on all goods sold in her par- [ 

lors, to all customers. | 

408 Bast State Street I 



In the Shakespeare class: Miss T — "What does the line 
in brackets mean — 'Burthen, dispersedly, within/ that you 
find in Ariel's song?" 

Miss L. — "That the spirits were carrying around little 
burdens or loads/' 



Otto Speith 
pboto iportratture 



Member Photographers Associatou of Illinois 



The Watson Studio Southwest Corner Square | 

miuuiiimiuiuiiuiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiimiiiiiiimMiniiiiiimiiiinMimiiiiniiiMiMiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMmiiiiniuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniMiiiniHiiiitiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiii^ 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiMiiiiiiiHmminiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiHHiiMiin 

3 

a 

I The most dainty thingfs in Rings and Jewelry. 

I New and handsome styles of goods in Sterling Silver 

I Highest grades of Cut Glass, and every 

I description of Spectacles and Eye Glasses 

I Fine Diamonds a Specialty 

I at 

I RUSSE)Ivi:v& LYON'S 

I West Side Square 

I Both Phones 96 



L. I. (in a letter home) — "I could not decide for a while 
what sort of a yolk I wanted for my white dress, but finally 
decided that an extended yolk would be better." 



i 


F. E. Fartell E. E. Crabtree 


Mathis, Kamm & Shibe say 


Established 1864 


We can furnish your 
Shoes and Party Slippers 


P. G. FARRELL & CO. 


in the popular styles. 


BANKERS 


leathers, and 
fabrics 


Successors to First National Bank 




Jacksonville, 111. 



i§rapl)ic 

arte 

Concern 



ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 



fiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimiMiniiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiH 1 iiiiiimi iiimrtiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiitiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiumiiiiiiiuiuiiiMiMiiiiiiuiiimu 



iimiiiiiiinininiiiiiiniiiiiiMiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriinitiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiitiinniiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii& 

For those who discriminate | 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to | 

please the students who come to our city. We select only the | 

best materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. | 

Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and | 

Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. | 

Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all I 

College functions. I 

Vickery & Merrigan 

c::ATEi=%EF=ts i 

227 West State Street [ 



A. F. — If we want more privileges, will Pauline Gran- 
tham? 

J. C. — "Oh, that bill has already been paid. I paid it 
some weeks hence." 



Hillerby's 
Dry Goods Store 

Safest Place 
to Trade 



The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital . . . ^200,000 
Surplus . . 32,000 

Deposits . . . 1,100,000 

U. S. Depository for Postal Saving Bank 

Julius B. Strawn, President 
Miller Weir, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear 

H. J. Rogers, A. A. Curry 

C. B. Grafi 



Brady Brothers 

Hardware, Cutlery 
Paints 



C.S.MARTIN 

Fine Pictures — Artistic Framing 

Frames and Ovals of all 

descriptions and sizes 

Imported and Domestic 
Wall Paper 

314 W. State St., Scott Block 

Jacksonville, 111. 



uiuiiiiiiiiwiiHuimiiiiiiiniiiuiiuiiiimimiiiuminiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiimiiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMniii^ 



s^iiiMiiniiiiMiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiMimiiiiiiiimmiiiniiiitiiiimiiiiiiHiMmniiiininiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiu 



J. A. OBERMEYER 



HARRY P. OBERMEYER 



CITY DRUG AND BOOK STORE 

Stationery, Pennants, Novelties, Drugs and 
TOILE)T REQUISITE'S 

Quality Counts — We Count 
Phones: Illinois 572, Bell 457 Corner South Main St: and Square 



R. P. — "If a woman has a whole lot of servants, what do 
they call them — a corpse ?^^ 

N. W. — "They've been using the verberator to cure X/s 
headache and she feels lots better now." 



{HARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO. 

I Designs, Cut Flowers, 

I Plants 

i Southwest Corner Square 

I Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

I Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

I Greenhouses, Bell 775 



THE SATISFACTION 
we enjoy through selling you 

OUR FINE SHOES 

is equaled only by 

YOUR SATISFACTION 

in wearing them 

Evening Slippers 

Jas. McGinnis & Co. 

62 East Side Square 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING 

for the latest in Suits, Ladies' Underwear, Ribbons 

Laces, Embroidery Materials or Notions 

Visit the store that carries the 

up-to-date merchandise 

F»HEL.F=»© <& OSBOFRNE 



flimillllimillllllll Ilin Illlllllllllllltllllll 1 Iltllllllllllllll IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII MIIIIIUIIH 



iiniMMniiiiMiiiiiMiiiiiiiiMiiiniiiiiiiinMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiMiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 

a 
s 

The bride s first choice for the home? i 

House Furnishings of Quality I 

from the 1 

ANDRE & ANDRE 

Our Special Room Furnishings will interest every student | 



Miss A. — "Well, but what is the name of the fig- 



ure 



?" 



II. M. — "I don't know, but I think it is parallelobiped." 



]Sr. S. (holding Bible and sweater) — "Well, I knew it 
would be cold in the chapel, so I just grabbed up my Bible 
and brought it." 



HOFFMAN'S 

Lunch Room 

Opposite Depots 

609-611 East State Street 

Jacksonville, 111. 



Len G. Magill I 
Printer | 

East State Street 111. Phone 418 | 



Montgomerv & Deppe 

Everything in Dry Goods 
Well Lighted First Floor Cloak and Suit Room 

Agents for the Ladies Home Journal Patterns 
The new "Howd" front laced corsets 



imiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniHiiiiiiiiiiiiitiniiiiiiirniMiiiiHiuMnnuiiiriiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiMHiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiMniiiiiiniiniiniiiMiHiM»iiiiinniiiiiiiiiii? 



^iiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriniiiiiiiiniiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinnniiiiiitiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiniiimiiniiiiniiiiiriiiiM 



It will pay you to visit 

SCHRAM'S 

Jewelry Store 



I 



Miss C. — "What is the difference between real and for- 
mal identity?" 

A. P. — "I don't get your question/' 

Miss C. — "Well, I am not at all surprised." 



I Fancy Articles Christmas Goods 

I COOVER & SHREVE'S 
I Drug Store 



Kodaks and Supplies 

Developing and Finishing 



I Dorwari Market. 

I AI.I, KINDS OF FRESH and 
I SALT MEATS, FISH, 
I POUI.TRY, ETC. 

I Both Phones 196 230 W. Stete St. 



COOK 

LIGHT with GAS 

HEAT 

Jacksonville Railway & 
L/ig-ht Company 

224 South Main Street 



Ask your gTOcer for 

HOLSUM 

BREAD 

Made Clean. Delivered cleat 
in waxed paper wrappers 



r.iiiiiiHiiHiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiMiMiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiMiiMHiniiMniiiiiiinitMiiiniiiniiiiiiiniiniiiiiiiiiiiHiiniiiiiiininnniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiMniiiiiMiiiiitimMntiiiiiMiiiM 



iiiHiiiiiiiiiiinniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiniiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiMiHiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

s 

Cafe Confectionary | 



U^eacock Inn 



Catering 



Soda 



Candies I 



Miss C. (in logic) — "A thing either has one attribute 



or 



• v 



H. C. (innocently) — "Or another." 



Oswald's 

Drug Store 

71 East Side Sq. 

TOII.ET ARTICLES 

PERFUMES 
FINE STATIONERY 



Ladies' High Grade, Late Style 
FUR SCARFS and MUFFS 

ARB SOIyD BY 

Frank Byrns 

Mott Reasonable Prices 



^. A. SGHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 East State St. Jacksonville, 111. 

Illinois Phone 388 



Pictorial Review Patterns 

For Sale at 




sEWiiV&GODS STORE 



mnHiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiitiiiiiiiiiriiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii; 



iiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiimiiimiiiHiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii imiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiimiiiHiiimiiimiiiiinii 

I College Jewelrv 

I Engraved Cards and invitations 

I Chafing Dishes, Copper and Brass Goods 
I Special Die Stationer/ 

I 21 South Side Square 



Mrs. X. to C. C, the night of Phi Nu play, as she gazed 
astonished at C.'s wig— "What was the matter? Typhoid?" 




JaGK90NVILL£, IU., 

Established 1890 

Low Prices Square Dealing- 
Keep us busy 



i 111. Phone 57 



Bell Phone 92 



Fresh Drugfs, 
Fancy Goods 
Stationery 



THE 



I Badoer Druo Siore 

i 2 doors West of Postoffice 



I 235 R. State Street 

iiMiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii nil iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii riiiiiiiiiii 



Florence Kirk King 
Hair Dresser 

Now prepared to manufact- 
ure French hair and combings 
into the 191 2-19 13 styles. 

Shampooing and scalp mas- 
sage by appointment at your 
residence. 

Illinois Phone 837 
Residence 503 West College Street 



If only you'll 

Remember Cherry's 

We'll be pleased, and we 
know positively that you'll 
find no cause for complaint. 

Our horses are safe; our equi- 
pages have character and in- 
dividuality, and our prices are 
most reasonable. 

Cherry's Livery 

Both Phones Jacksonville, 111. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii>iiiiiiii>iiii""»<""|"<|""*'*"""'"" 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiniiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiinniiii iiii iiiiiiiiriiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiniiii^ 



f- 



GEO. T. DOUGLAS 
Fancy Groceries 



234 West State St. 



738 East North St. 



In Logic: Miss C.^"Wliat do we make the center of 



space 1 



H. C. (very matter of fact) — "Our own heads. 



Jacksonville's Largest Mens' Store 
Pennants and Banners 

[. W. C. and Fraternity special designs 

Mannish Cut Sweater Coats 

Hand Bag's, Trunks 

and Suits Cases 



GIRLS 

Our Baby Minnette Photo 
is just the thing 
you are looking for 
Call and see 

McDougall 

The West State Street 
Photogradher 

iiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii I iiiiiiiii nil n 



PACIFIC 

Jacksonville's Best and most 
Popular 

HOTEL 

The Home of the Traveling Man 
Jno. B. Snell, Prop. 
Rates I2.25, I2.50, and $3.00 per day 
One Block West of Womans College 
Opposite Post Office 
Rooms with or without bath 
Local and Long Distance Telephone 

in every room. 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiii I iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii„,„„„„„„„T| 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiitiitiiiitiii iiiiiiiiiiiiitiniiiiin Ill I iiiiiniiiniiiitiiiiiiiii ii iim niiiiiiin iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiitimiiiim 

j It is our business to get new goods for you 

I We are never fully satisfied with our stock, but keep con- 

1 stantly adding to it in order that no customer's needs may be over- 

i looked. Besides we believe it our duty to be forever watchful of 

I the marketsand so secure "EVERYTHING" and "THE BEST" 
I We do not depend on onlyone line to make a profit — hence 

I can sell cheaper. 
I A complete line of Drugs and Groceries 

jphone. 800 I^QBEIIE^TS BIE^OS. Phone. SCO 

I Open every working day and night. 

I 29 South Side Sq. 



Miss c. — "What is your definition of space, Miss P.?" 
A. P. (tentatively) — "Space is what is left when we take 
things out." 



A Woman's Store 

nilecl witn the Luxuries and Necessities wtilcti appeal 
to tne heart of everv woman 

Advanced STgles at 
Moderate Prices 

We take a pride in proclaiming- that we have the 
lightest, brightest store in the State of Illinois, filled by 
a rapidly chang-ing- stock of attractive merchandise, and 
catering ever to the wants of young women. 

Coats Suits Dresses Costumes 

Waists Gloves Hosiery Jewelry 

Laces Ribbons Corsets Neckwear 

Linens Notions Art Goods Handkerchiefs 



ws 



LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. 

Iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii Ill iiiiiiiiiiiiiif 



HiiiiifiiiiiimiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimniiiiniiiiHiiiiimiiiiiiiiiMmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiinmmiiiMiMiiiiiiiiiiiniiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiirb 

SKIRT BOXES | 

ROCKERS, SCREENS, DESKS | 

AND BED ROOM CURTAINS | 

AT I 

Tohnsoii, Hackett & Guthriel 



Miss Y. (at a recent election, to Miss X) — "Vote for 

yourself, girl; vote for yourself." 

Miss X — "I can't. Why, you know I can't." 

Miss Y. (disgusted) — "Do you suppose Wilson voted for 

Eoosevelt?" 



KODAK FINISHING 
Vulcan Roll Films 

Cameras from $2.00 up 
verything- strictly first class 

Claude B. Vail 

>swald's Drug Store 71 E. Side Sq. 



rank BUiott, Prea. Wm. R. Routt, Vice-Pres. 
C. A. Johnson, Vice-Pres. 

J. Weir Elliott, Cashier 

J. Allerton Palmer, Asst, Cashier 



OLLIOTT STATE BANK 

Jacksonville, 111. 



Capital 
Undivided Profits 

Frank Elliott 
J. Weir Elliott 
Wm. R. Routt 
Wm. S. EUoitt 



$150,000 
$ 15,000 

Frank R. Elliott 
John A. Bellatti 
C. A. Johnson 



Piepenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 

HERE TO PI.EASE 

Candies Cakes 

Cookies Pies 

Sandwiches Pop on Ice 

Groceries California Fruits 
School Supplies 



Girls 

Don't forg-et our Advertisers 



miiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiit iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iMiiii 



llllllllllllliiiiiiniiiiiii,-: 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiihiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiitiiiiiMiiiiH 



Dr. Albyn Lincoln Adams 

Oculist and Aarist 
to the State School for the Blind 

323 West State Street 



DR. KOPPERL 

Dentist 



326 West state St. 



Practice limited to diseases of the 
Bye, Bar, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 



In Logic: E. A. — "Space is what we put things in. No, 
I mean, space is what our mind thinks we put things in." 



Dr. R. R. BUCKTHORPE 
Dentist 

111. Phone, House 1054 

Office 750 
Bell Phone, Office 512 
Over Hatch Drug Store 

Jacksonville, 111. 



DR. BYRON S. GAILEY 

EYE 
EAR 
NOSE 
THROAT 

340 West State Street 



fiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHhiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiHiiiiiiiiiHin 



Th<f Collcy? Girl 

The Summer winds were kind to you 
And left your face an Indian hue 
But when your school work you plan 
Of course you want to lose your tan. 
So use YARA Greaseless Cream 

25 cents the jar. 
Armstrong's Drug Store S. W. Cor- 
ner Square. 



DR. CARL E. BLACK 

Office— 349 E. State St. 
Both Phones 85 
Residence 1305 West State St. 

Both Phones 38 

Surgery — Patsavant Memorial Hospita 

and Our Saviours Hospital 

Hospital Hours — 9:00 a. m. to la m. 

Office Hours — 1:30 to 4 p, m. Even- 
ings and Sundays by appointment 



iiuiiiiiiiiiniiniMniiiiiiiiiiiiiitiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiuiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniMiHttiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiM^ 



10. 



she:et music, music me^rcfiandisp: 

talking machines, records 

and supplies 

19 SOUTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE 



Miss N. learned in a recent test paper that Beirut con- 
tains a college and has an acadamized road. 



Ayers 



Capital 
^200,000 

Surplus 
^90,000 

Deposits 
^1,000,000 

FOUNDEIJ 1852 




The combined capi- 
tal and surplus of this 
bank is 

One Quarter 
Million 
Dollars 

the largest of any bank 
in Morgan County. 

UNITED STATES 
DEPOSITORY 



OFFICERS 

M. F. Dunlap, President O. F. Buffe, Cashier 

Andrew Russel, Vice President R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashier 

R. M. Hockenhull, Vice President H. C, Clement, Asst. Cashier 

C. G. Rutledge, Vice President 



Owen P. Thompson 
Bdward F. Goltra 
fohn W. Leach 



DIRECTORS 
George Deitrick 
R. M. Hockenhull 
M. F. Dunlap 



Harry M. Capps 
O. F. Buffe 
Andrew Russel 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiii^ 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinMiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiHiiH^ 




FALL FootM^ear 

OUR SPECIALTY 

Dress Slippers 
Street Shoes 
5?droom Slippers 

We Repair Shoes 

ia:o:p:p:H]K.s' 



Miss II. (with long drawn sigh of satisfaction) — "Well, 
I never did see any one like her. Why, I just feel as if I had 
the Eock of Ages back of me when Miss J. is interested in 
the same thing I am." 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Fancy Bazaar 
and Millinery 

211 West state Street 



TAYLOR'S 



Grocery 

A gfood place to trade 



221 West State Street 



::iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Illinois Phone 419 Bell Phone 417 

A. L. Bromley 

Ladies' Tailor 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and 
Repairing. Ladies' Man Tail- 
ored Suits to order. Remodeling 
of all kinds. Special rates to 
I. W. C. students. All work 
called for and delivered promptly 



GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 



iimiiiiimmiiimiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiMiniiiMiMiiiiiimiiiMiMiiiMiiiiniiuiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiininmiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiMiiiiiniMim 



' ^a^iloj^lrxig 



We beg: to announce the opening of a Special Department | 

for making | 

LADIES' SUITS AND COATS | 

and will appreciate a call to inspect our Spring Styles and | 

Fabrics. I 

All Work Guaranteed. Prices Reasonable. I 



JACKSONVILLE TAILORING COMPANY 



233 East State Street 



Opposite Pacific Hotel 



Classy Styles 



We will be pleased to show you our line 



W. T. REAUGH 

Fashionable Footwear 



For All Occasions 



33 South Side Square 



Jacksonville, 111. 



GO TO 
FOR 

Fresh Homemade Candies 

Hot and Cold Sodas 

All kinds of Fresh and 
Salted Nuts 

Sast State St. 

iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiii 



Our Prices Make Cleaning | 

a Necessity | 

Dry Cleaned and Pressed [ 
Ladies' List 

Skirts 50c i 

Jackets , 50c I 

Waists 50c and up [ 

Longcoats 1,00 | 

Dresses i.oo and up I 

Sanitary Cleaning Shop 

214 S. Sandy St, Both Phones 631 | 

We call for your goods | 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiMiiiT 




Mnsio Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1850 



Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

i College of Liberal Arts 

I (Full classical and scientific courses) 

I College of Music 

I School of Fine Arts 

I School of Expression 

School of Home Economics 

^A Standard College — one of the best. 
; Regular college and academy courses 

\ leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- 

inently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located 
in the Middle West, in a beautiful, 
I dignified, old college town, noted for 

its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends 
who are looking for a good college. 
Call or address. Registrar 

Illinois Woman's College, 

Jacksonville, 111. 




f^llHllllllllllllinillllllllllMIIHIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinilllllllllllllllllllllllllinillllllllllMlllllllllllltlllllUIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIUIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUI^ 



tICije CoUese #reetingg 

4| The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 
€JJ Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month. 

€JI Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
€}f Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 



Contents 

United States in the Council of Nations 3 

Peter, the Passerby 9 

The Blue Bird and thel,and of the Blue Flower .... 13 

Editorial 16 

Wesley Mathers Contest 16 

Schumann-Heink , . > 18 

Calzin 19 

Departments 20 

Society Notes 22 

Class Stunts 27 



The 
Graphic Arts 

CONCERK 



THE QUESTION 

"Were the whole world good as you-not an atom better- 
Were It just as pure and true, 
Just as pure and true as you; 
Just as strong in faith and works; 
Just as free from crafty quirks; 
All extortion, all deceit; 
Schemes its neighbor to defeat; 
Schemes its neighborsto defraud; 
Schemes some culprit to applaud- 
Would this world be better?" 

•'If the whole world followed you-followed to the letter- 
Would it be a nobler world, 
All deceit and falsehood hurled 
From it altogether; 
Malice, selfishness and lust 
Banished from beneath the crust 
Covering human hearts from view- 
Tell me, if it followed you. 
Would the world be better?" 






^ 



tt be (TolleGC (3reetinG6 

Vol. XVI Jacksonville, III., May, 191 3 No 8 



UNITED STATES IN THE COUNCIL OF 
NATIONS 

(Prize Essay, Wesley Mathers Contest.) 
The United States of the twentieth century stands as 
a world power in the Council of Nations. Twenty-five years 
ago the terms, "world povv^er' and "council of nations," were 
practically unknown, but today these expressions only are 
not known 'but are causes of much debate. Many different 
meanings have been attached to them, but for general pur- 
poses it is adequate to define a world power as a nation whose 
foreign relations and interests are such that that nation must 
be reckoned with in any political, commercial or social move- 
ment contemplated by the leading nations of the world. 

The development of a nation into a world power is the 
result of many phases of growth. Of this entangled maze 
of growth may be clearly seen two lines of development. 
Around them center the factors that have made the United 
States a member of the Council. The advance to this posi- 
tion rests upon development territorial and commercial. The 
territorial expansion of the United States has been made for 
her commercial interests, so that instead of being two paral- 
lel growths they somewhat overlap. 

Because of the importance of the United States today in 
the commercial world, one is apt to forget that there was 
once a period when the United States was a thinly popu- 
lated strip of territory, of little consequence either terri- 
torially or commercially . One also forgets the years of in- 
ternal struggle and growth necessary to place the United 
States in such a position that she could successfully start on 
her later territorial expansion, One hundred and twenty- 
Page Three 




Wbt CoQege <§reettngi$ 




five years ago the United States, a weak nation, struggling 
with an experiment in a new kind of government, was try- 
ing to obtain the good will of both England and France, as 
well as to maintain her independence. During this period 
when the form of her government hung in the balance, the 
young republic, by choice, as well as by necessity, adopted 
the policy proclaimed in President Washington's farewell ad- 
dress, the policy of remaining independent, allying with no 
foreign power, and interfering with no foreign political sit- 
uation. This policy of isolation seemed to be the only way 
to solve the great problem, for to have interfered would have 
been to be dominated. Realizing that the space occupied by 
the thirteen states was too limited, the United States entered 
upon a period of internal growth which was to bring about 
expansion from coast to coast. 

Then began her contact with the powers of Europe. 
Owing to the exchange of Louisiana between Spain and 
France the United States became alarmed, and as a result 
the territory was purchased in 1803. The significance of this 
acquisition was two-fold, it doubled the area of the United 
States, and it ended the contest of rival European powers 
for possession in the valley of the Mississippi. The purchase 
of Florida in 1819, showed the republic's determination not 
to give in to a European power. The Oregon dispute, be- 
gun in 1819, but not fully settled until 1848, brought the 
American government into relations with more powers. All 
these points of contact served to make the powers realize that 
there was a United States, that it had rights, and that they 
must recognize the necessity of respecting those rights. 

Thus in 1823 the United States, beginning to discern 
her strength, felt capable of proclaiming to the world the 
policy of America for Americans. She became the protector 
of the greatest doctrine of the United States, the Monroe 
Doctrine. Adhering to this, the United States not only con- 
tinued upon the policy of never mixing with afi'airs of 
Europe, but also went further in maintaining that she would 
not allow Europe to meddle with Cisatlantic affairs. This 
Page Four 



turtle CoUege #reetms£( 




warning was effective, as was afterwards shown by the non- 
interference policies of the nations. This attitude of Europe 
showed that the United States had unintentionally begun to 
take a hand in the world politics, for by this doctrine she, 
as a nation, had said that she would not tolerate European 
powers if they initiated trouble on American soil. 

With her boundaries tripled and her foreign policy 
firmly stated, the United States entered upon an industrial 
growth which was to place her among the nations. Her many 
inventions were making her a great manufacturing country. 
She was producing more than could be used by her own citi- 
zens. Hence there arose the demand for foreign ports, not 
only in Europe, but in oceanic islands. Thus, in the last 
half decade of the nineteenth century the United States, 
for the first time, began her territorial expansion beyond the 
continent of North America. She now took the few remain- 
ing decisive steps which in the end were to place her in her 
great position as a member of the Council, ranking with 
England, France, Germany, and Russia. This great step was 
first taken in the Hawaiian question. As Hawaii was very 
important to the United States as a convenient stopping 
place for ships trading between the East and the West, the 
American people bought large tracts of land and thus en- 
tered further into the world's commerce. Here, too, Amer- 
ica planted several large naval stations. During the revolu- 
tion in the islands in 1893, the United States, induced by 
these reasons, was determined to interfere. As a result, the 
islands were annexed. American merchants were assured of 
a stopping place and an extension of trade in these islands. 
Furthermore, the rights of American citizens in the islands 
were protected. Following close upon the annexation of 
these mid-Pacific islands came the occupation of the Philip- 
pines. By the treaty of Paris in 1898, the United States was 
given formal possession of these islands. 

Here truly had the United States enlarged her sphere 
of interests. No longer could she draw back when world 
politics were being discussed. No longer, as a nation con- 

Fage Five 




Wi}t College ^reettngtf 



fining itself to the boundaries of her own country, could she 
refuse to be involved in questions of other nations. Her suc- 
cess in the Pacific definitely changed the United States in re- 
gard to foreign relations. JSTow was she bound to a policy of 
interest, and even of interference in world-wide politics. She 
was no longer merely a power in the western hemisphere. 
Dewey's first gun in Manila harbor was an indication that 
the United States was going to follow the ambition of her 
trade. Protection of her interests came to mean active par- 
ticipation in world politics, based on territorial possession. 
The United States must henceforth play an equal part with 
the nations in the Eastern problems or neglect her own in- 
terests and confess herself dominated by other powers. 

There has been much discussion as to the exact time of 
admittance of the United States into the Council of Nations. 
Though it is difficult to determine a definite date, many his- 
torians record that the United States finally became a world 
power in 1898, at the time of her interference in Cuba. Kela- 
tive to this definite stage of transition, said a foreign ambas- 
sador at Washington, that although he had been in America 
only a short time he had seen two different countries — the 
United States before the war with Spain and the United 
States since the war with Spain. It is now generally ac- 
cepted that this war was a turning point in the history of 
the United States. For many years the United States had 
been interested in Cuba, for American citizens possessed 
great areas on the island. She had been especially irritated 
at Spain's treatment of the natives. Furthermore, American 
citizens were maltreated and trade was disturbed. Eepeated 
revolts greatly endangered American interests. It became 
evident that the United States must do something. Though 
the prime reason lay not in her sympathy with the insur- 
gents, she felt that the time for action had come. She could 
no longer ignore the perpetual commotion so near her, and 
the intolerable insults offered American citizens. The blow- 
ing up of the Maine held out to the United States a direct 
challenge. In order to show that she was acting from no 
Page Six 



VCfit CoUese 4lreeting£( 



selfish motives the United States stated in declaring war 
with Spain, that it was not her intention to annex the island, 
but to free it from Spain. The important result of this war 
to America was not the liberation of Cuba, but the terri- 
torial changes brought about by the prestige obtained, for 
now the United States had a stronger strategic position in 
the Gulf of Mexico and in the Caribbean Sea. Before this 
war the United States, that had taken little part in inter- 
national politics, had enjoyed popularity abroad. Now came 
a change. Because the nations were becoming alarmed she 
lost this popularity, but gained importance in international 
politics — for it was shown by the Spanish war that the 
United States was a naval power, that she commanded the 
Pacific, and even threatened to attack Spain in her own 
waters. 

This supremacy of the United States in the Pacific has 
caused many to wonder if the United States can still adhere 
to the Monroe Doctrine in regard to the Eastern question. 
They have wondered at the United States policy of open 
door for China. If "America is for Americans," why not 
"x\sia for Asiatics?" The United States maintains that her 
policy towards China has always been friendly. No matter 
what her diplomatic relations with the government of China, 
the United States was determined not to allow her citizens' 
rights to be trampled on by insurgents. Thus the Boxer 
uprisings saw the United States troops in the thick of the 
fight. Her powerful position was recognized as having equal 
force with the position of Germany and Great Britain in the 
settlement of the tumultuous problem. 

The United States was now in a position to demand re- 
spect for her law-abiding citizens the world over. Of this 
fact the powers of the world stood cognizant. With the set- 
tlement of the uprising, the United States' commerce in the 
East was safe. She now has control of the Pacific. Her 
manufactures have entered all ports, at first perhaps grad- 
ually, then by leaps and bounds until the American people 
now stand as producers for the world. Today American 

Page Seven 



Wiit College ^reetingsi 



made machinery is found in the mills and factories of al- 
most every land. American locomotives steam across the 
plains of Eussia and Siberia on American made rails. Yankee 
farm machinery is harvesting the crops of far distant coun- 
tries. American boots and shoes, American grain, American 
cotton, American manufactures in every line are known and 
used. 

The United States seems to have reached her commer- 
cial height, but this is not all. America's newest project, 
the Panama canal, will make her even more a great nation 
commercially. Through this canal will pass billions of dol- 
lars of trade. As guardian of this new passageway between 
the East and the West, the United States will be in an in- 
ternational position comparable to that occupied by Great 
Britain as owner of the Suez canal. The United States will 
become a dominant factor in the trade with the East. Not 
only will her shipping be benefited, but the shipping of other 
nations depends upon her policy. With the increase in 
trade with the East incidental to the new political develop- 
ment in that hemisphere, the United States will stand in 
the place of highest eminence. The policy of the United 
States in regard to the canal is now of high importance to 
the other powers, and each succeeding decade will make it 
more important. As a world power the United States will 
reflect this importance and occupy a larger place in the 
Council of Nations. 

Today so securely does the United States sit in this 
council that her diplomatic policy is a matter of moment to 
all the powers. American commerce is everywhere. Terri 
torially the United States stands as a great colonial empire. 
Her policies of government help to determine the world. 
For three reasons does the United States hold her seat in 
the Council of Nations. Internally, she has developed her 
resources until she has become a great nation. Commercially, 
she has entered all the markets of the world. Territorially, 
her interests span both hemispheres. As a world power the 
United States has been so fully recognized that though the 

Page Eight 




Wiit CoUege ^Irectingg 




future make-up of the Council of the ISTations is proble- 
matic, whatever be the character of this council, the United 
States will be represented. 

Geneva Upp, '14. 

PETER, THE PASSER-BY 

Perhaps if she had always been well and strong, perhaps 
if her appearance on the street among the many, busy pass- 
ers-by had been more frequent instead of a very wonderful 
event, then perhaps she wouldn't have been so interested in 
other people's affairs. On the other hand, though, she might 
have been a regular gossip and busybody, hated by every one, 
while as it was her interest in the affairs of others never did 
harm; in fact, people only loved her the more for it, for 
Adena's interest was not in little personal affairs, but rather 
in her fancies concerning the people she saw, strangers 
oftimes. 

Her few trips into the city were never to be forgotten 
events. She sav/ more in one trip than the rest of us saw in 
years. She was always brim full of what she had seen and 
heard, and the rest of us, having seen and heard the same 
things, too, were as eager to hear her tales as if a glimpse of 
the outside world had never been ours. 

Much as she loved these city folks, however, it was the 
everyday people, the ones she knew by sight intimately, that 
she loved the more, and such a list of friends as it was, too. 
The Cynic, hated at first, and, in fact, for two long years be- 
cause his expression so evidently showed his sneering views 
on life, had been taken into the family immediately upon 
the discovery that he not only was deaf, but that he had 
never been taught to speak, and now he was daily watched 
for and given his smile along with the rest of the street 
friends. So long she and the Cynic had been friends now 
that I doubt if she even remembered the first hatred. In 
stead she waited for his coming, and it was once when she 
was watching for him that she first met Peters. Why she 

P»ge Nin« 




Wi)t CoUegc Greetings! 




insisted on calling him Peters without even so much as a re- 
spectful "Mr." I can't imagine, unless it was because the 
first time she ever saw the name it was just Peters, and 
Peters it remained, common and homely as it was, surely 
needing the adornment of a title if ever name did; but then 
for a long time we knew him by no name at all. 

Adena had called excitedly for me to come, "Will you 
look at this man? What do you suppose is the matter?" 
I looked and there making his way down the walk was a 
most pitiful sight, the wreck of a man. Evidently he had 
once been gloriously big and strong for he was still very 
large, although disease had bent his body and paralysis made 
walking far worse than any attempt of a child's. Yet his face 
was still splendidly fine, and somehow there was the feeling 
that not alone physically was he a big man. He went by 
every day, and daily our wonder and curiosity grew. A dozen 
careers were planned for him, but always we came back to 
Adena's first statement concerning him — "He must have 
been an awfully big man or he wouldn't fight so gloriously 
now when California is so evidently the last resort," and 
again and again she would say: 

"But he's such a fighter he must win this time. He's 
going to get well." 

Always there was with him the dainty, cheery little 
wife, whose protecting hand, small as it was, must have given 
him abundant courage. There was the big, strong nurse, too, 
sometimes fairly carrying the "Big Man" along, or again on 
the good days walking at a respectful distance behind. Some- 
times the old stone steps in front of the house served as a 
resting spot, and then there was an opportunity to study 
him better, and Adena watched him closely. 

"He's gone too far today," she would say, or "How much 
better he walks now. Bravo!" but still she had no actual 
facts. Who or what he was she knew not, but it made little 
difl'erence now as long as he was one of her friends. He must 
have known she was a kindred spirit, for he always looked 
for her as he passed the house. At first rather inquiringly 
Page Ten 




^be CoUege ^tntinzi 




and then once he had made her cry as he, for a moment for- 
getful of his own uselessness, tried in vain to lift his hat, but 
always he looked expectantly, always giving a queer little 
half nod to show he knew she was there, and so their friend- 
ship grew. 

Then one day he didn't come. Adena was disappointed, 
still it was fairly easy to make excuses for one day, but the 
second day and the third day passed — a week and the "Big 
JJ-ian" had not come our way. Both of us tried to believe he 
had chosen another street; perhaps he could walk forth now, 
or he vras entertaining eastern guests and walks were sus- 
pended for the time being; perhaps they were trying the 
benefits of the sea air — but heroically we both avoided the 
thought uppermost in our minds. Inward conviction told us 
both that our big man was worse. 

"It's no use watching any longer to-night," Adena an- 
nounced, tr3dng to be cheerful. "Let's read the newspaper 
and see what is going on in the outside world." She reached 
for the p:iper, assuming great interest. The political news 
was dry and hard to follow, but the society page looked more 
attractive, weddings and showers galore, and then as she 
turned from one thing to another her eye fell on the simple 
notice confronting her in plain, black type: 

Peters, John B., died at his temporary residence, St. 
Francis Court, June 12. Mr. Peters, for many years a polit- 
ical power in Michigan, came to California a few months ago 
for his health. Pie leaves a wife and one son, J. B. Peters, 
Jr., of Detroit, Michigan, to mourn his loss. Detroit and 
Saginaw papers please copy. 

Never before had we known his name, but at once we 
knew this must be our friend. The address was plausible 
enough, the few lines fitted him exactly. There could be no 
mistake. Somehow I had expected this all along and had 
supposed that Adena had, too, but she refused to be com- 
forted. Over and over again she would repeat: 

"He was such a fighter, he can't die yet." She got some 
little comfortj however, out of the fact that at last she knew 

Page Eleyen 




drtie CoOege ^ttttinqsi 




his name, and there was still Mrs. Peters and the far-off son 
to be thought of. 

She had lost track of other friends before, but some- 
how this was different. He had interested her in another 
way. She had counted so much on the benefits of the Cali- 
fornian sun. Now she talked repeatedly of Peters, his wife 
or the friends at home. The meager notice had given her 
facts to dream on for hours. Did I suppose his money was 
all tied up? What did I suppose his wife would do now? 
and a dozen other questions were asked. Before he had been 
only a dream man, even though she saw his physical self. 
Now, though dead, he had become a real man with a real 
name, and with great care his name had been put down in 
the little red covered book with its golden title, "My book 
of friends and why." "Peters, because he fought so well." 

With numerous schemes attempts were made to divert 
her mind, and for a time, at least, it seemed as if he was ap- 
parently forgotten in the excitement of a journey into the 
city. The rest of us hoped at the end of the wonderful day 
so much would have been seen that Peters would seem less 
real, but the hope was in vain. 

As we entered a big fascinating store in the midst of a 
surging mass of people we saw before us — the big form of 
our old friend! Forgetful of crowd and everything else we 
involuntarily cried, "Peters!" then embarrassed we looked at 
each other in amazement. Naturally enough, however, the 
real Peters having died some time before, our friend failed 
to realize that we had addressed him, not recognizing us 
away from our setting, and so, unconcernedly with only the 
support of a cane, he made his way to a machine drawn up 
by the curb, a machine we had seen pass the house times 
without number and wondered about the owner. 

Excitement now reigned in our home. We talked of 
nothing else save Peters, who had been as one dead and then 
returned to life again. Peters, grown straight, perhaps a 
business man now. And the funny part of it was we never 
once thought of calling him the Big Man again. Peters he 
Page Twelve 



tEi}t College (2lreetins£( 




had been in death, and the most aristocratic name in the 
bluest of blue books could never fit him now, and always 
when we spoke of him Adena would triumphantly add, "I 
always said he had to get well." 

Arlene Hammell. 

THE BLUE BIRD AND THE LAND OF THE 
BLUE FLOWERS 

The pursuit and acquisition of happiness has ever been 
an interesting theme in the world of letters. Poets, essayists, 
novelists and dramatists have offered their various theories, 
sonic in a convincing, some in a merely artistic manner. 
Among present day writers the dramatist, Maurice Maeter- 
linck, and the story-teller, Frances Hodgson Burnett, have 
sought to give an adequate expression to this world old prob- 
lem; the one through the means of an ornate drama, the 
other through the means of a simple story. The drama with 
its intricate mechanism, its wealth of detail, its mystery 
clouded atmosphere, v/ould lead you to believe that the search 
for happiness is as unreal and far removed from every day 
experience as were the quests of the knights of old; the story, 
with its directness, its simplicity, its sun-lit atmosphere 
would lead you to believe that the search for happiness is as 
real as the most ordinary day's happening. 

In the "Blue Bird" the children wander about with 
their friends, whose sym'bolisms you grow weary trying to 
translate, awed and frightened. They visit all the realms of 
time, they see much that is beautiful and pleasing, much that 
is not. Bewildered and j^uzzled, they are bounced from place 
to place like helpless puppets. The elusive Blue Bird always 
evades them; the inhabitants of the realms of time can offer 
them no assistance; Light alone seems to know the secret, but 
she is Sphinx-like in her silence. With superiority and aloof- 
ness she guides the little seekers to the realms they must visit, 
but she offers no suggestions, shows no further helpfulness. 
At the end of their quest, still puzzled, still frightened, the 

Page Thirteen 




Wtt CoQtse (fireetingsf 




children return home empty handed to find that their own 
little song bird is blue. What has happened on the long 
journey to have taught them that he was, is not told, but blue 
he appears. With Joy the children take him from his cage 
to give him to their sick playmate for whom they had sought 
him. Even while the joy of giving is fresh upon them, the 
bird turns black, just as did the one they had caught on their 
quest. Once more the Blue Bird of Happiness has flown 
away, fickle, elusive thing that it is. 

In the "Land of the Blue Flower," hapipness has far 
different, far more satisfying qualities. Here it is not an 
elusive mocker, a will of the wisp, fiitting ever before the 
seeker's eyes, never to be caught, or falling into dust and 
ashes at a touch. The Blue Flower produces seeds without 
number, seeds that a wise and generous king gives freely to 
his subjects. The cultivation of the seed results in the pro- 
duction of a beautiful flower, it also results in less tangible 
gains. When the king gave the seeds to his people his realm 
was not beautiful, it was not peaceful. Hatred and jealousy 
had ruled so long that love and helpfulness were forgotten. 
Because the king had been taught that there was no time for 
anger, no time for hatred in the world, he wished to teach 
his people what the Wise One had taught him. He gave to 
them the seeds he had saved from his own Blue Flower which 
a bird had brought him from an emperor's secret garden. 
Throughout his realm the edict was sent that every man, 
M^oman and child should plant a seed and care for it, and one 
year from the day of the planting the king would ride 
through the realm to see the result of their labor. The year 
passed, and as the king rode, the people, who the year before 
had fled in terror as he approached, now met him with shouts 
of joy, smiles instead of scowls, clear straight glances of love 
instead of furtive sidewise glances of distrust. The streets 
were clean, the children, instead of quarreling in the gutters, 
were playing among the Blue Flowers. Everywhere the Blue 
Flowers were growing in profusion, their beauty softening 
harsh ugly corners of poor houses, even as their healing pow° 
er had softened the harsh lines of world-weary faces. 

Page Fourteen 



iffl iwrftffi i nfJB iaa 




tIDtie CoHese ^vettin^i 



Very different is this simple story from the complex 
drama, yet each would tell you of happiness. The one makes 
it a mysterious, half-pleasing, half-terrifying thing that you 
can never really acquire; the other makes it a very real and 
necessary thing, a thing you may have for the effort of cul- 
tivating its tiny seed, a seed that grows and blossoms and 
yields more seeds in order that Blue Flowers may cover an 
entire realm. The drama has the effect of a building that is 
heavily decorated where the structure requires no ornamen- 
tation; the story has the effect of the comfortable arrange- 
ment of a simple cottage that is a real home. The elaborate 
symbolism of the "Blue Bird" wearies and irritates. You 
may feel it an excellent opportunity for the ingenuity of 
stage craft to be displayed, you may be charmed by the beau- 
tiful scenic effects, but a drama must be something more 
than a passing show of a scenic railway. The "Land of the 
Blue Flower" may not equal the artistic workmanship of 
parts of the "Blue Bird," but its appeal is wider, its sympa- 
thy more nearly universal, its happiness saner. 

Janette Powell. 




Page Fifteen 




Cfje CoUege (§rectingg 




Pacuwy Committee— Miss Weaver, Miss Tanner, Miss Neville. 
Bditor -Lois M. Coultas 

Associate Editors — Elizabeth Tendick, Letta Irwin, Mary I/awson 
Business Managers— Elizabeth Dunbar, Emily Jane Allan, Helena 
Munson. 



Dr. Harker, who has been away from the college almost 
all the time for the last six weeks, was back for a few days 
in the middle of the month, and reported gifts of such an 
amount as to leave only $55,000 still to be given on our 
$180,000 fund. 

In many schools and colleges, the one big interest for 
the entire student body is found in athletics — athletics aside 
from regular gymnasium work. Here at I. W. C, the stu- 
dents have been almost indifferent to this form of activity. 
Indifferent, however, as we may have seemed on the surface, 
the lack of sufficient outlet for the right kind of enthusiasm, 
has been felt and deplored. This spring marks what we feel 
confident is the auspicious beginning of a vital interest in 
this important part of college spirit and loyalty. The Ath- 
letic Association, for the last three years a purely nominal 
organization, has, under its efficient president, Feril Hess, 
become aroused to its possibilities. In a definite way it has 
begun to meet the needs of the student body. A Hike club 
and an Archery Club have been organized, and plans for a 
big tennis tournament are being made. 

Special thanks are due to the faculty for the interest 
they have shown and the support they have given in this 
work. The tennis trophy which they have presented to the 
association means very much, coming as it does at this time. 

WESLEY MATHERS CONTEST 

The Wesley Mathers Essay Contest was held in Music 
Hall, April 18th. The program for the evening was: 

A Court for Child Offenders — Letta Irwin. 
Page Sixteen 




tB^i)e CoUese ^xtttin^i 




The Boy and the Play Ground — Feril Hess. 

The Path of Medical Triumph— Celia S. Cathcart. 

The United States in the Council of Nations — Geneva 
Upp. 

The first prize was accorded to Geneva Upp, the second 
to Feril Hess. The decision, however, was made with diffi- 
culty, as the four essays were all of unusual merit. 

The contest was an occasion for new class songs and 
heated yelling: 

There are eight loyal Juniors, 

With hearts so true and tried. 
In them you find the grit and go. 

And everything else — that's wide. 
They've come with comrades big and strong 
To cheer for their own classmates. 
For Letta and Geneva Upp 
Their yells will never stop. 
Here's to the Juniors, 
Juniors, tra-la-la. 
Bright Jolly Juniors, 
Tra-la-la. Eah! Rah! Rah! 

We've been working for the Juniors all the afternoon, 

Never did we have such pleasure. 
For the Sophomores sure are doomed. 

But we never will regret it, the Juniors sure will win. 

We're here at this contest to win. 

And say, won't the Juniors be blue? 
We'll all hang together, in rain or shiny weather. 

For we're going to see the whole thing through. 
Well! Well! Well! 
Hail! Hail! the Sophs are all here. 
We know we're sure to win. 
We know we're sure to win. 
Hail! Hail! our Seniors, too. 
Who scared the Juniors, now? 

Page Seventeen 




Wiit CoUege ^vntinQH 




Oh, Contest Day just comes around but once a year, 
Oh Sophomores, ain't you glad we're here? 
See the girls all dressed in white, 
And Sophomore colors flying bright. 

Look out for our Cathcart and Hess. 
They are bright, 
They will fight. 

Oh, Contest Day! 
With Seniors grave, and Preps so gay. 
Sophomore honors still should come our way. 
We don't care for Juniors, and let them come and meet 
fate. 

Oh, you Contest Day! 

SCHUMANN-HEINK 

On the evening of March 25, Madam Schumann-Heink 
appeared for the first time in Jacksonville. It is needless 
to say anything of her wonderful voice and charming per- 
sonality, as she is well known to all. Schumann-Heink was 
ably assisted in her program by a young American pianist, 
Edward Collins, who gave several piano numbers, displaying 
great brilliancy and clearness of his technic. The program 
was as follows: 
Three Arias from the opera "Samson and Delilah" .... 

Saint Saens 

a. Spring Song. 

b. Oh, Love of Thy Might. 

c. My Heart at Thy Sweet Voice. 

Impromptu (F Sharp Minor) Chopin 

Tarantelle Chopin 

Mr. Edward Collins. 

a. Die Junge Konne P. Schubert 

b. Die Forelle F. Schubert 

c. Widmung Eobert Schumann 

d. Traume Wagner 

e. Im Herbst Franz 

Page Eighteen 



t!Di)e CoOese Greetings; 




f. Spinnerliedchen . . . H. Eeimann Collection, 17th Century 

a. Barcarolle (a minor) Eubenstein 

b. Fileuse Pensive Ganz 

c. La Campanelle Paganini-Liszt 

Mr. Edward Collins. 

(a) Mother O'Mine Chas. F. Edson 

(b) When the Eoses Bloom (17th century) . Louise Eeinhardt 

(c) Cry of Eachel M. A. Salter 

(d) Kerry Dance J. L. Malloy 

CALZIN 

Alfred Calzin, pianist, appeared in recital on the even- 
ing of April 4th. This was the last musical number of the 
Woman's College Artist's Course. He gave a very interest- 
ing program, which was as follows: 

Variations Serieuses, Op. 54 Mendelssohn 

Ballade, Op. 33 Chopin 

Etude, Op. 10, No. 3 Chopin 

Etude, Op. 23, No. 2 Eubenstein 

Etude, Op. 1, No. 2 Paul de Schloezer 

To a Water Lily MacDowell 

Humoresque, No. 1 Grieg 

Erotik, Op. No. 5 Grieg 

Valse de Concert (for left hand alone) Ticky-Calzin 

Arabesque, No. 2 Debussy 

Arabesque, No. 1 Debussy 

En Forme de Valse Saint Saens 

Valse Lente, Op. 8 Jenas 

Hungarian March ♦...,......,, Liszt 



r-" 



Page Nineteen 




Wiit CoUcge (Jlreetingjat 




epartmentg 



COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

On the evening of Easter Sunday Mrs. Hartmann as- 
sisted in special music at Grace M. E. church. 

Director and Associate Director Swarthout and Miss 
Miller furnished special music for the annual Easter service 
of the local lodge of Knight Templars at the Baptist church. 

Miss Jess Eottger, a former graduate of the voice de- 
partment, has accepted the position of monitor in the fore- 
noon, and Miss Olsen, who was formerly morning monitor, 
has changed her work to the afternoon. 

Mrs. Florence Pierron Hartmann appeared in recital 
Monday evening, April 7. Mrs. Hartmann was greeted by 
a large audience and again endeared herself to all. Mr. Max 
Swarthout acted in the capacity of accompanist and added 
much to the artistic rendering of the program. Mrs. Hart- 
mann gave the following program: 

Del Mio Dolce Ardor, 1714-1787 Gluck 

L'esperto Nocchiera, 1619 Bononcini 

Aria from Astarte. 

Daheim Hugo Kann 

Wiegenlied Schubert 

Standchen Brahms 

Von Ewiger Liebe. 

Her Eose Whitney Coombs 

Snake Charmer . Lehman 

Poem from "The Golden Threshold" by Sarajini Naidu. 

Sleep of Sorrow Tschaikowsky 

Four Songs from Sun and Shade Cycle . . . Coleridge-Taylor 

1. You Lay So Still. 

2. Thou Hast Bewitched Me. 

3. The Rainbow. 
Page Twenty 



Ktt CoUegc #rectinsst 




4. Thou Art Eisen. 

Les Filles de Cadix Delibes 

L'Heure Exquise Hahn 

Crepuscule Massenet 

Hai Lull Coquard 

Minuet d'Exaudet Arr. by Wekerlin 

From 17th Century. 

The programs at the Thursday afternoon recitals have 
been unusually good and unusually well attended. 

The Mid-Term Eecital by the students of the Interme- 
diate grade was given Thursday evening, April 17. 

The College of Music is planning to give a vesper con- 
cert Sunday afternoon. May 4. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

A new plan has been adopted in the department by 
means of which the Home Economics Seniors are better able 
to give their meals within a limited number of weeks. Groups 
of three girls each prepare and serve breakfast, luncheon and 
dinner on the same day, each girl acting in turn in the ca- 
pacity of cook, waitress and hostess. 

The textile class is planning a trip through the Capps 
woolen mills, by which they will see in operation the pro- 
cesses which they have been studying. 

The series of lectures given by Mr. Crabtree to the 
Hoiisehold Economics class on "Banking'^ is to be completed 
by an inspection of the bank which Mr. Crabtree represents. 

A tea was given by Miss Lucile Gernhart to faculty and 
seniors on April 12, in the Domestic Art room. 

EXPRESSION NOTES 

April 11th two clever plays, "The Pipe of Peace" and 
the "Obstinate Family," were given by the expression stu- 

Page Twenty-one 



mm a m 




dents under the direction of Miss Kidder. The proceeds of 
the plays were given to the endowment fund. 

The first of the Senior recitals was given Friday, April 
25th, when Miss Helen Moore read "Paolo and Francesca.'^ 
The drama made many demands upon the reader, but her in- 
terpretation and sympathy left nothing to be desired in her 
rendition. 

Miss Kidder read the Passing of the Third Floor Back" 
at the April meeting of the I. W. C. Guild. 

Eequests to act as judge at various contests have come 
to the department from several nearby towns. Miss Parsons 
recently Judged at the Whipple Academy-Knox contest, and 
at the Barry high school preliminary. April 26, Miss Kid- 
der acted as judge at the high school meet held at Havana, 
Illinois. 

Miss Parson's critical class met April 19th in Mrs. Hart- 
mann's studio, when the subject of readings with musical 
settings was discussed. The discussion was made interesting 
by five examples. 

SOCIETY NOTES 

The first open meeting of the Lambda Alpha Mu So- 
ciety was held in Music Hall March 18th. The program was 
carefully planned and rendered in such a way as to bring 
credit to the society. A special feature was the ensemble 
number given by Mary Shastid and Ann Fitzpatrick. Euth 
Want, in her usual pleasing style, gave a very entertaining 
talk on "Lambda Mu Embarked." Helena Munsen read a 
carefully prepared and instructive paper dealing with the 
work of Jane Addams, Mildred Wolfer read "The Casting 
Vote," and Bonita Olsen gave a very pleasing number on 
the violin. The meeting was well attended and the program 
was received with an appreciation very gratifying and en- 
couraging to us all. 

Page Twenty-two 




tKfje CoUegc (greetings! 




Lambda Mu is very much pleased with the result of the 
candy sale given April 12th. 

The officers for next year have already been elected and 
will take their places the first of May so that they may be 
thoroughly acquainted with the duties of their respective 
offices before the beginning of the year. They are as fol- 
lows: 

President — Euth Want. 
Vice-President — Mary Shastid. 
Eecording Secretary — Anne Fitzpatrick. 
Coresponding Secretary— Florence Hilbish. 
Treasurer — Helena Munsen. 
Critic — Mary Louise Powel